Help with integrated handlebars.

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Alan O'Brien, Feb 9, 2017.

  1. Alan O'Brien

    Alan O'Brien New Member

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    Hi guys, I was wondering if you could help with a little problem I'm having. Basically, I ride a 2012 giant TCR advanced 2 which has a 1 1/4 inch fork steerer tube, my wife bought me as a present a set of cinelli ram 2 integrated handlebars, the problem I'm having is that the handlebars will only fit a 1 1/8 inch steerer tube. Is there anything out on the market to adapt handlebar to steerer tube or am I just stuck with a very expensive yet very light paperweight?
     
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  2. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    All kinds of adapters out there, but I can't Google up a 1/1/4" to 1-1/8" stem reducer type adapter.

    If your steerer is carbon it's going to be real 'iffy' anyway. Sure, You could tighten up your steerer's expanding preload cap and slip on an aluminum adapter (any decent machine shop could build one to a sketch provided you have a couple hundred bucks more to blow on the project) that was stepped otside diameters, slipped over your steerer and clamped via a pair of pinch bolts. Then the bars would install conventional on the smaller stepped diameter.

    The problem would be loading your steerer tube far above the usually recommended 30 MM height and...jacking those sweet Cinelli bars up that high kind of defeats the whole purpose on the badass look of those integrated bars.

    The upside is now your wife, upon hearing you weep in the basement as you caress your lovely carbon bars will probably grant you permission to buy a matching Cinelli frame and fork that fits the bars. Before she comes to her senses, burn the credit card down ordering a new Record EPS group to complete the build. Next Spring you will be a GOD among your cycling buddies!
     
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  3. dabac

    dabac Well-Known Member

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    I think you're screwed.
    There's definitely no easy way to make a 1 1/8" hole fit over a 1 1/4" tube.

    You have to decide what you like most, the bars or the fork.
    Either has to go.

    Finding adapters to let you run a fork with a 1 1/8" steerer in your frame is likely to be an easier option.
     
  4. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, headset adapters are everywhere so installing a new fork is an option. Not sure I would want to bastardize the TCR though.
     
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  5. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    ... AND, PASS THE AMMUNITION ...

    As noted, YOU CANNOT SLEEVE A 1.125" STEM OVER THE CURRENT 1.25" STEERER ...​

    Regardless, your current dilemma is not without a fairly easy resolution ...

    It only requires that you are moderately handy + that you are willing to undertake a fairly simple DIY project ...

    GIVEN that your current fork's steerer is probably a "hollow" carbon fiber tube ...

    Presuming that you are comfortable with your bike's current setup as far as handlebar height & reach AND your new Cinelli bars would theoretically replicate the position if you could mount it, then YOU simply need to replace the upper portion of teh steerer which is equal to the height of your current stem .. ​

    So, YOU only need to be able to measure the inner diameter (ID) of your current steerer ...

    In a "perfect world" it will be 31.8mm (1 1/8") ... you can probably get a 10" piece "scrap" (alloy) steerer from your LBS ... worst case scenario, you can probably buy 1 1/8" OD steel pipe from a plumbing supply store ...

    The minimum size of the steerer's ID which you can work with is a minuscule 22.2mm.​

    And then, replace a portion with a length of 1 1/8" ("salvaged" from the installation of a standard fork) steerer ...

    I would probably want the inserted tube to extend an inch below the upper headset bearings ...

    I would definitely want at least 2cm of the current steerer to extend above the headset.​
    1. measure the ID of the steerer
      • procure ~10" length of 1 1/8" tubing
    2. measure the height of the new stem
      • if you are happy with your bike's current setup, then that is the amount of the current steerer which you will be removing-and-replacing
      • if the steerer has an expansion nut, then tap out through the bottom of the steerer
        • OR, if it is a "cap" which was epoxied in, it will already be gone when you remove the excess steerer (put it in your tool box now that you know that you never know when you will want a salvaged part to use)
      • mark the steerer at a distance from its top to the length you measured for your new stem's height
      • wrap a piece of masking tape around measurement below the mark
      • use a hacksaw with a fine tooth blade to remove the excess steerer
      • debur with a half-round file or some fine sandpaper
      • clean out & dry
    3. Dry fit the new tubing ...
      • if it is too loose, figure out how much you will need to shim it*
    4. if it is "just right" then (again, AFTER cleaning and drying all the contact surfaces) you will want to apply a thin coat of JB WELD (accept NO SUBSTITUTES) to the inside of the interior of the old steerer and to the portion of the tube to be inserted into the new steerer.
      • BTW. I would probably wrap tape around the inserted tube where I want it to protrude to ensure that it isn't accidentally pushed down while the epoxy is curing.
    5. Set aside ...
    6. Let cure ...
    7. AFTER ~24hrs, remove the tape & re-install the spacers & stem
    8. Adjust and tighten
    9. Install levers & housing & cables
    10. Wrap handlebars with tape
    11. DONE!
    * After you measure the inner diameter, let me know what it is.
    If you have ANY questions, feel free to ask.
     
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  6. Alan O'Brien

    Alan O'Brien New Member

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    Hi
    Hi alfeng, sorry for taking so long to get back to you, the internal diameter of the head tube is 1.082 inches or 27.52 mm.
     
  7. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    ALMOST AS GOOD ...

    The steerer's 27.52mm inner diameter is actually almost as good as if it were 31.8mm!!!

    EITHER you can begin with an alloy ("salvaged") 27.2mm seatpost which you would shim inside the fork's steerer ...

    I would probably opt to make the inserted extension from an alloy seatpost because an inexpensive, alloy seatpost will be more robust than a ultra-light CF seatpost.​

    I would want at least as much of the "seatpost" to be bonded inside the interior of the steerer as extends above it ...

    You can take up some of the slack with a shim cut from an aluminum soda-or-beer can which is apparently 0.2mm thick (you can also choose BRASS foil instead of cutting the DIY shim from an aluminum can)... scuff both sides with course emery cloth ... dry fit ... reduce as necessary (remember: the epoxy will take up some of the measured difference) ... clean & epoxy the shim + "seatpost" with the fore mentioned J B Weld ...

    AND THEN, sleeve an off-the-shelf 27.2mm-to-31.8mm seatpost shim (lip edge 'down' OR remove the lip as you deem to be needed-or-not) onto the 27.2mm insertion ...

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Wheels-Manu...703693?hash=item5418f10d8d:g:AeQAAOSwTglYmQ06

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/BICYCLE-SEA...351725?hash=item5af6f5aa6d:g:4j4AAOxyn~pR3h5S

    Rather than trim the length of the 27.2mm-to-31.8mm shim, I would probably stack spacers between the Cinelli bar's stem & the 1.25" spacers ...

    The "seatpost shim" does not need to be bonded to the DIY extension.​

    OR you could insert a LONG shim to reduce the steerer's INNER DIAMETER to 25.4mm and then use a 1"-TO-1.125" QUIILL ADAPTER ...

    If you are really patient, you can bend aluminum stock into a seamed tube OR try to source some 1" ID (aluminum) tubing.​

    REMEMBER. Measure twice, cut once!
     
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  8. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    YIKES!
    Apparently, I was-or-am arithmetically challenged and you will want a 27.2-to-29.0 shim which you may-or-may-not have to reduce by a small fraction to get it to 1.125" ...
    Regardless, BEFORE you begin, you will probably want to ensure that you can press a star nut for a 1" steerer into the "seatpost" you will be using as the extension ...
    If the star nut for a 1" steerer doesn't fit snugly, you can probably either use JB WELD to secure it OR you can fabricate an anchor from a "spare" alloy top cap which you would epoxy into place.
    REMEMBER to keep the threads clean!

     
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  9. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    BTW ...

    The proposed transformation is NOT irreversible ...

    While it will not be a perfect restoration, if you want to restore the original steerer (for example, you decide you want to sell the frame/fork in the future) to allow the use of the original stem, then you simply have to sleeve the removed portion of the original steerer (which you should save in your "tool box") over the 27.2mm extension & epoxy it in place with some more JB WELD ...

    The ONLY (?) subsequent modification prior to "restoration" is either to push the star nut out of the 1.25" remnant OR to shorten the 27.2mm portion of the steerer so that the star nut does not contact it.​




     
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