Help with Presta Valves

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by Kytmakr, Jun 21, 2003.

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  1. Kytmakr

    Kytmakr Guest

    I've been lurking here in the newsgroup for a couple of weeks. Seems like a relatively harmless
    group so I thought I'd post a question.

    I just bought a Rans V-Rex last Monday (my first bent) and decided to go on a local organized ride
    today. I had plans to do a 70 mile route. Things were going great, there was a grin on my face
    despite the rain, until I got a flat tire at about the 30 mile mark.

    I thought I would have a go at trying to re-inflate my tire until I could get to the next rest stop.
    I was able to pump the tire up a bit but then the presta valve broke off inside my pump. I didn't
    have anything small enough to dig it out so I decided that while I waited for a support vehicle to
    come by I would start change the tube out. (I learned my lesson the hard way about having a spare
    tube along on a ride a while back so I try to have a spare with me always.) Just as I finished
    getting the tire back on the bike a Good Samaritan came along that had a tool small tool that could
    get the stuck stem out of my pump. I started pumping up my tire. I got about 50 psi into the tire
    when the stem on this tube broke off also! I was forced to finish the ride in the back of a support
    van all the way back to the start line. :-((

    Anyhow, my question is: Are there any tricks that people know of to prevent this from happening?
    This is my first experience with presta valves so I really don't know anything about them. Any
    insight would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

    Robin Haas
     
    Tags:


  2. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    Kytmakr wrote:
    >
    > I've been lurking here in the newsgroup for a couple of weeks. Seems like a relatively harmless
    > group so I thought I'd post a question.
    >
    > I just bought a Rans V-Rex last Monday (my first bent) and decided to go on a local organized ride
    > today. I had plans to do a 70 mile route. Things were going great, there was a grin on my face
    > despite the rain, until I got a flat tire at about the 30 mile mark.
    >
    > I thought I would have a go at trying to re-inflate my tire until I could get to the next rest
    > stop. I was able to pump the tire up a bit but then the presta valve broke off inside my pump. I
    > didn't have anything small enough to dig it out so I decided that while I waited for a support
    > vehicle to come by I would start change the tube out. (I learned my lesson the hard way about
    > having a spare tube along on a ride a while back so I try to have a spare with me always.) Just as
    > I finished getting the tire back on the bike a Good Samaritan came along that had a tool small
    > tool that could get the stuck stem out of my pump. I started pumping up my tire. I got about 50
    > psi into the tire when the stem on this tube broke off also! I was forced to finish the ride in
    > the back of a support van all the way back to the start line. :-((
    >
    > Anyhow, my question is: Are there any tricks that people know of to prevent this from happening?
    > This is my first experience with presta valves so I really don't know anything about them. Any
    > insight would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.
    >
    > Robin Haas

    The most probable explanations are that there is something wrong with the pump or you are bending
    the valve stem while pumping up the tire which can cause it to break off. A portable pump with a
    hose might solve the problem - the Topeak Morph pumps work well in my experience. < http://www.tope-
    ak.com/cgi-bin/SoftCart.exe/Store/raodmorphG.html?L+scstore+lngv3222ff311531+1056255581
    >

    Tom Sherman - Various HPV's Quad Cities USA (Illinois side)
     
  3. I've got good news for you, Robin.

    This is an extremely rare thing to have happen to you, in fact I have never heard of it happening
    before, so it is NOT likely to happen to you again.

    The first thing to do with a Presta tube is to throw away the little knurled 'nut' that is threaded
    onto the stem. Next, make sure that your pumping action is smooth and does not tend to bend the
    valve stem or jerk the wheel in any direction.

    Now, unless you have something radically wrong with your pump, your inflation job will be a
    breeze. :)

    Lewis.

    .....................

    [email protected] (Kytmakr) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I've been lurking here in the newsgroup for a couple of weeks. Seems like a relatively harmless
    > group so I thought I'd post a question.
    >
    > I just bought a Rans V-Rex last Monday (my first bent) and decided to go on a local organized ride
    > today. I had plans to do a 70 mile route. Things were going great, there was a grin on my face
    > despite the rain, until I got a flat tire at about the 30 mile mark.
    >
    > I thought I would have a go at trying to re-inflate my tire until I could get to the next rest
    > stop. I was able to pump the tire up a bit but then the presta valve broke off inside my pump. I
    > didn't have anything small enough to dig it out so I decided that while I waited for a support
    > vehicle to come by I would start change the tube out. (I learned my lesson the hard way about
    > having a spare tube along on a ride a while back so I try to have a spare with me always.) Just as
    > I finished getting the tire back on the bike a Good Samaritan came along that had a tool small
    > tool that could get the stuck stem out of my pump. I started pumping up my tire. I got about 50
    > psi into the tire when the stem on this tube broke off also! I was forced to finish the ride in
    > the back of a support van all the way back to the start line. :-((
    >
    > Anyhow, my question is: Are there any tricks that people know of to prevent this from happening?
    > This is my first experience with presta valves so I really don't know anything about them. Any
    > insight would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.
    >
    > Robin Haas
     
  4. Actually its quite common. I see quite a few customers in my shop with just such a tube. Well
    anyway, there is a rihgt way and a wrong way to pump up a presta tube. First of all the pump get a
    good one. I currently use an SKS Road made in Germany. Technique is important. You must steady the
    pump head with the non pumping hand. If you don't you can often break off the valve. Yesterday a
    girl on a nice road bike did it. I was on my way home and saw her pushing her bike. I stopped and
    she told me she ruined her only tube by breaking the valve off and she doubted that I could help
    since she had 650C wheels. To her surprise I had her tube size. I wipped off her wheel, put in her
    new tube and gave her a lesson on how to use her pump. Then pumped it up with my floor pump.
    Suggestion, find out who the most knowledgable bike person is around your ways and get a lesson in
    road pump usage.

    --
    Jude....///Bacchetta AERO St. Michaels and Tilghman Island.. Maryland Wheel Doctor Cycle and Sports,
    Inc 1-800-586-6645 "Lewis Campbell" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I've got good news for you, Robin.
    >
    > This is an extremely rare thing to have happen to you, in fact I have never heard of it happening
    > before, so it is NOT likely to happen to you again.
    >
    > The first thing to do with a Presta tube is to throw away the little knurled 'nut' that is
    > threaded onto the stem. Next, make sure that your pumping action is smooth and does not tend to
    > bend the valve stem or jerk the wheel in any direction.
    >
    > Now, unless you have something radically wrong with your pump, your inflation job will be a
    > breeze. :)
    >
    > Lewis.
    >
    > .....................
    >
    >
    > [email protected] (Kytmakr) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > I've been lurking here in the newsgroup for a couple of weeks. Seems
    like a
    > > relatively harmless group so I thought I'd post a question.
    > >
    > > I just bought a Rans V-Rex last Monday (my first bent) and decided to go
    on a
    > > local organized ride today. I had plans to do a 70 mile route. Things
    were
    > > going great, there was a grin on my face despite the rain, until I got a
    flat
    > > tire at about the 30 mile mark.
    > >
    > > I thought I would have a go at trying to re-inflate my tire until I
    could get
    > > to the next rest stop. I was able to pump the tire up a bit but then
    the
    > > presta valve broke off inside my pump. I didn't have anything small
    enough to
    > > dig it out so I decided that while I waited for a support vehicle to
    come by I
    > > would start change the tube out. (I learned my lesson the hard way
    about
    > > having a spare tube along on a ride a while back so I try to have a
    spare with
    > > me always.) Just as I finished getting the tire back on the bike a Good Samaritan came along
    > > that had a tool small tool that could get the stuck
    stem
    > > out of my pump. I started pumping up my tire. I got about 50 psi into
    the
    > > tire when the stem on this tube broke off also! I was forced to finish
    the
    > > ride in the back of a support van all the way back to the start line.
    :-((
    > >
    > > Anyhow, my question is: Are there any tricks that people know of to
    prevent
    > > this from happening? This is my first experience with presta valves so
    I
    > > really don't know anything about them. Any insight would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.
    > >
    > > Robin Haas
     
  5. Tom Blum

    Tom Blum Guest

    To add to Jude's advice. Get a Topeak Road Morph, with gage.

    Never has a roadside pumpup been easier. I had a flat last month and my untested Kmart sale pump
    (It's good enough ) wouldn't work. A riding companion had the road morph. It's just a bit more
    cumbersome than a shop floor pump.

    --
    Miles of Smiles,

    Tom Blum Winter Haven, Florida Homebuilts: SWB Tour Easy Clone Speed Machine Clone

    www.gate.net/~teblum
     
  6. Some excellent advice out there especially the topeak road morph. I would like to add I use a
    schrader valve adapter with presta tubes. Yes it's a bit of a pain, but I have yet to break a presta
    valve covered with an adapter, on the other hand I have broken presta valves with presta pumps on
    several occasions. Denny in Sayre, Pa "Bent but not Broken "...
    > > Actually its quite common. I see quite a few customers in my shop with
    > > just such a tube. Well anyway, there is a rihgt way and a wrong way to
    pump
    > >up a presta tube.
     
  7. Arnold Layne

    Arnold Layne Guest

    Ditto on the Road Morph. One thing that comes to mind is that pumps vary but some pumps have a
    reversible rubber piece and also a reversible plastic piece that forces the valve stem down on a
    Shrader tube. It needs to be turned around when using the pump on a Presta. I'm not sure if this is
    what you have or if this could even cause the stem to break off but it was just a thought. "Denny
    Voorhees" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Some excellent advice out there especially the topeak road morph. I would like to add I use a
    > schrader valve adapter with presta tubes. Yes it's a
    bit
    > of a pain, but I have yet to break a presta valve covered with an adapter, on the other hand I
    > have broken presta valves with presta pumps on several occasions. Denny in Sayre, Pa "Bent but not
    > Broken "...
    > > > Actually its quite common. I see quite a few customers in my shop with
    > > > just such a tube. Well anyway, there is a rihgt way and a wrong way to
    > pump
    > > >up a presta tube.
     
  8. Jeff Wills

    Jeff Wills Guest

    "Tom Blum" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > To add to Jude's advice. Get a Topeak Road Morph, with gage.
    >
    > Never has a roadside pumpup been easier. I had a flat last month and my untested Kmart sale pump
    > (It's good enough ) wouldn't work. A riding companion had the road morph. It's just a bit more
    > cumbersome than a shop floor pump.
    >

    I'll ditto Tom's recommendation of the Road Morph pump- it's converted me from my former rabid
    loyalty to my Silca frame pump.

    If you don't want to invest in a new pump, I'll echo Jude's advice: you should never, ever, put
    side pressure on the valve when using a frame pump. I used that Silca frame pump for nearly 15
    years- I never damaged a valve. In fact, I have never broken a presta valve in the 25 years I've
    worked with them.

    Another recommendation: use the frame pump for on-the-road repairs only. Get a good, sturdy floor
    pump and top up your tire pressure once a week. This will prevent snakebite flats and help you catch
    slow leaks.

    Jeff
     
  9. Don

    Don Guest

    Robin, the Morph pumps are heavier and more expensive than a regular mini-pump. Don't buy one. Just
    make sure you do what Tom does---always ride with someone who carries one :)

    "Tom Blum" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > To add to Jude's advice. Get a Topeak Road Morph, with gage.
    >
    > Never has a roadside pumpup been easier. I had a flat last month and my untested Kmart sale pump
    > (It's good enough ) wouldn't work. A riding companion had the road morph. It's just a bit more
    > cumbersome than a shop floor pump.
    >
    >
    > --
    > Miles of Smiles,
    >
    > Tom Blum Winter Haven, Florida Homebuilts: SWB Tour Easy Clone Speed Machine Clone
    >
    > www.gate.net/~teblum
     
  10. Bob Rogers

    Bob Rogers Guest

    "Arnold Layne" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Ditto on the Road Morph. One thing that comes to mind is that pumps vary but some pumps have a
    > reversible rubber piece and also a reversible plastic piece that forces the valve stem down on a
    > Shrader tube. It needs to be turned around when using the pump on a Presta. I'm not sure if this
    > is what you have or if this could even cause the stem to break off but it was just a thought.
    > "Denny Voorhees" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > Some excellent advice out there especially the topeak road morph. I would like to add I use a
    > > schrader valve adapter with presta tubes. Yes it's a
    > bit
    > > of a pain, but I have yet to break a presta valve covered with an adapter, on the other hand I
    > > have broken presta valves with presta pumps on several occasions. Denny in Sayre, Pa "Bent but
    > > not Broken "...
    > > > > Actually its quite common. I see quite a few customers in my shop with
    > > > > just such a tube. Well anyway, there is a rihgt way and a wrong way to
    > pump
    > > > >up a presta tube.
    > >
    > >

    I just read the previous message from Denny Voorhees: Since you are new to Presta valves, Denny has
    a point: when you "convert" your pump, not only do you need to reverse the rubber "liner", but also
    reverse the little plastic valve actuating piece; the Schrader end is pointed but the Presta end
    just has a hole in it so it won't break off the end of the valve. It seems likely that this could be
    your culprit. Bob Rogers
     
  11. Skip

    Skip Guest

    As you surely know Kytmakr there are two kinds of valves commonly found on bicycle tires. One of
    them is wimpy and can break if you don't use exactly the right technique and apply a little too much
    pressure in the wrong way. The other is robust and can take just about anything you or the pump can
    dish out. It is called a Schrader valve. Your rim can most likely accommodate a tube with a Schrader
    valve so you might want to look at that option. I see no disadvantage to using them on a street
    recumbent with fatter, lower pressure tires.

    skip
     
  12. Bill Hole

    Bill Hole Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, "skip" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > As you surely know Kytmakr there are two kinds of valves commonly found on bicycle tires. One of
    > them is wimpy and can break if you don't use exactly the right technique and apply a little too
    > much pressure in the wrong way. The other is robust and can take just about anything you or the
    > pump can dish out. It is called a Schrader valve. Your rim can most likely accommodate a tube with
    > a Schrader valve so you might want to look at that option. I see no disadvantage to using them on
    > a street recumbent with fatter, lower pressure tires.
    >
    > skip
    >

    I'm going to play devil's advocate here. My Pursuit has a 20X1.25 Schwalbe City Jet up front with a
    presta valve, and a 20X1.75 Comp Pool in back with Schrader valve. I've run both kinds of valves on
    various bikes over the years, and have never had a valve failure on Presta. However, the last two
    flats I've had on my Comp Pool have both been Schrader valve failures. The first had the valve
    separate from the tire at the seam. This might not be a real valve failure but I've never seen
    Presta do this. The second failure saw the wall of the Schrader valve split open. I've also seen
    many Schraders develop leaks in the valve body.

    So in my experience the Presta is a sturdier, more reliable design. YMMV.

    Bill Hole Rotator Pursuit BikeE E2

    --
    Bill Hole [email protected]
     
  13. Bill Hole wrote:

    > So in my experience the Presta is a sturdier, more reliable design.

    I have long maintained that the application of the Schraeder Valve to the noble Bicycle is surely
    the Work of Stan. This proves it. Cheers, Bill!

    ;-)

    Dave Larrington - http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/
    ===========================================================
    Editor - British Human Power Club Newsletter
    http://www.bhpc.org.uk/
    ===========================================================
     
  14. In article <[email protected]>, "Dave says...
    >
    >Bill Hole wrote:
    >
    >> So in my experience the Presta is a sturdier, more reliable design.
    >
    >I have long maintained that the application of the Schraeder Valve to the noble Bicycle is surely
    >the Work of Stan. This proves it. Cheers, Bill!

    So whose this Stan guy? ;)
     
  15. Skip

    Skip Guest

    "Steve Christensen" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>, "Dave says...
    > >
    > >Bill Hole wrote:
    > >
    > >> So in my experience the Presta is a sturdier, more reliable design.
    > >
    > >I have long maintained that the application of the Schraeder Valve to the noble Bicycle is surely
    > >the Work of Stan. This proves it. Cheers, Bill!
    >
    >
    >
    > So whose this Stan guy? ;)

    That would be Stan Schrader - the inventor of the Schrader valve.

    skip
     
  16. J'M Sm'Th

    J'M Sm'Th Guest

    Kytmakr wrote:

    > >
    >
    > Thanks to everyone for their input. My pump is a Blackburn Mammoth Mountain. It accomodates both
    > Schrader and Presta valves. When I picked up a couple of new tubes I talked to the person at the
    > LBS. They pretty much said what you did, Jude. I think this was my error because I hadn't braced
    > the pump. Live and learn!
    >
    > Robin Haas RANS V-Rex

    I've got the same pump. When I use it [for roadside repairs only], I grip the two spokes adjacent to
    the valve with my thumb and forefinger [thumb up, palm facing pump head] with my left arm on the
    opposite side of the wheel from the pump. With the remaining fingers of my left hand, I grab the
    upright lever on the pump head firmly, and try to hold the whole thing steady while I pump with my
    right hand. Have yet to break a presta valve [knock on wood].

    --
    J'm

    To Reply Direct, Remove Clothes. ...-.-
     
  17. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    skip wrote:
    >
    > "Steve Christensen" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > In article <[email protected]>, "Dave says...
    > > >
    > > >Bill Hole wrote:
    > > >
    > > >> So in my experience the Presta is a sturdier, more reliable design.
    > > >
    > > >I have long maintained that the application of the Schraeder Valve to the noble Bicycle is
    > > >surely the Work of Stan. This proves it. Cheers, Bill!
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > So whose this Stan guy? ;)
    >
    > That would be Stan Schrader - the inventor of the Schrader valve.

    The Schrader valve was invented by George Schrader in 1891. The company founded by his father August
    Schrader in 1844 is still in business as Schrader-Bridgeport.

    Tom Sherman - Various HPV's Quad Cities USA (Illinois side)
     
  18. sarablack

    sarablack New Member

    Joined:
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    You're a star! A few months ago, I bought a bike for the first time in years. This weekend, I decided to top up the front tyre, which was beginning to go soft. After half an hour staring in bemusement at very strange valve and pump that was obviously not a match for the strange valve, I turned to the Web. Now I know that the valve is a Presta valve and the pump can be made to fit by turning the rubber piece round. All is clear! And really quite easy. (I've almost got the tyre back up to the level it was at when I decided it needing topping up -- how long does it take other people to pump up tyres?)
    Thanks to everyone for being so knowledgeable and willing to share your knowledge.
    Sara

     
  19. Ian

    Ian Guest

    >> of a pain, but I have yet to break a presta valve covered with an
    >>> adapter, on the other hand I have broken presta valves with presta pumps on several occasions.

    I have experienced and have heard of other people finding the valve body of Continental inner tubes
    with presta valves, snapping off when using a hand pump, this has yeat to occur when using Schwalbe
    inner tubes, at least to me or anyone I know, so if you have Continental inner tubes, be gentle with
    those presta valves, might save a long walk home.

    Ian
     
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