Help with Sausage Gravy?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Richard's ~JA~, Feb 23, 2004.

  1. Please, the local shop aboard closed down leaving many of us to miss their sausage gravy over
    biscuits. I make great biscuits, but have no idea what seasonings should be added to any of the 1
    lb. amounts of common grocery store ground sausage. This shop did once say that is all they used,
    just plain ole ground sausage, but with a wink to tell it takes the right seasonings to end up with
    their not too salty, not too peppery finish. I'm already smooth-gravy challenged, but reading here
    tells me the roux first method for the flour is best. I will do that for adding to the browned
    sausage, but from my good Penzeys stock, what seasonings would any of you suggest?

    Picky ~JA~
     
    Tags:


  2. Richard's ~JA~ wrote:
    >
    > Please, the local shop aboard closed down leaving many of us to miss their sausage gravy over
    > biscuits. I make great biscuits, but have no idea what seasonings should be added to any of the 1
    > lb. amounts of common grocery store ground sausage. This shop did once say that is all they used,
    > just plain ole ground sausage, but with a wink to tell it takes the right seasonings to end up
    > with their not too salty, not too peppery finish. I'm already smooth-gravy challenged, but reading
    > here tells me the roux first method for the flour is best. I will do that for adding to the
    > browned sausage, but from my good Penzeys stock, what seasonings would any of you suggest?
    >
    > Picky ~JA~

    I just buy a 1-lb. log of Bob Evans "hot" bulk sausage. (or Jimmy Dean if there's not Bon Evans). I
    brown the sausage and break it up. Then I just add about 6 T. flour to the pan and cook a little to
    cook the flour and mix it well with the sausage grease. Then I add 1 qt. of cold milk and mix well
    and bring it back up to heat. Cook until it thickens up and that's it. Best sausage gravy I've ever
    eaten. I can barely eat it in a restaurant anymore since they don't put nearly enough sausage in the
    gravy and some of them seem to be thickened with something other than flour that makes the sauce
    kinda gloppy which I don't like. My version is adapted from a recipe from the Frugal Gourmet.

    Kate

    --
    Kate Connally “If I were as old as I feel, I’d be dead already.” Goldfish: “The wholesome snack that
    smiles back, Until you bite their heads off.” What if the hokey pokey really *is* what it's all
    about? mailto:[email protected]
     
  3. Jmcquown

    Jmcquown Guest

    Kate Connally wrote:
    > Richard's ~JA~ wrote:
    >>
    >> Please, the local shop aboard closed down leaving many of us to miss their sausage gravy over
    >> biscuits.

    >> Picky ~JA~
    >
    > I just buy a 1-lb. log of Bob Evans "hot" bulk sausage. (or Jimmy Dean if there's not Bon Evans).
    > I brown the sausage and break it up. Then I just add about 6 T. flour to the pan and cook a little
    > to cook the flour and mix it well with the sausage grease. Then I add 1 qt. of cold milk and mix
    > well and bring it back up to heat. Cook until it thickens up and that's it. Best sausage gravy
    > I've ever eaten. Kate

    I concur. I buy Jimmy Dean or Tennessee Pride and it doesn't have to be the 'hot' variety, although
    that helps with the flavour a bit. No seasonings necessary other than black pepper if you don't use
    the 'hot' sausage.

    Jill
     
  4. Elaine

    Elaine Guest

    Could you tell me what kind of biscuits you make. I've never heard of sausage gravy, sounds great
    though. Would that be a breakfast thing??
    E.

    > Please, the local shop aboard closed down leaving many of us to miss their sausage gravy over
    > biscuits. I make great biscuits, but have no idea what seasonings should be added to any of the 1
    > lb. amounts of common grocery store ground sausage. > Picky ~JA~
     
  5. Peter Aitken

    Peter Aitken Guest

    "Richard's ~JA~" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Please, the local shop aboard closed down leaving many of us to miss their sausage gravy over
    > biscuits. I make great biscuits, but have no idea what seasonings should be added to any of the 1
    > lb. amounts of common grocery store ground sausage. This shop did once say that is all they used,
    > just plain ole ground sausage, but with a wink to tell it takes the right seasonings to end up
    > with their not too salty, not too peppery finish. I'm already smooth-gravy challenged, but reading
    > here tells me the roux first method for the flour is best. I will do that for adding to the
    > browned sausage, but from my good Penzeys stock, what seasonings would any of you suggest?
    >
    > Picky ~JA~

    I have a recipe on my page at http://www.pgacon.com/cooking.htm#Sausage%20gravy. There's no
    way to give exact amounts for S&P because it depends on your taste and the seasoning of the
    sausage you use.

    --
    Peter Aitken

    Remove the crap from my email address before using.
     
  6. John W

    John W Guest

    On Mon, 23 Feb 2004 09:15:53 -0800 (PST), [email protected]
    (Richard's ~JA~) wrote:

    >Please, the local shop aboard closed down leaving many of us to miss their sausage gravy over
    >biscuits. I make great biscuits, but have no idea what seasonings should be added to any of the 1
    >lb. amounts of common grocery store ground sausage. This shop did once say that is all they used,
    >just plain ole ground sausage, but with a wink to tell it takes the right seasonings to end up with
    >their not too salty, not too peppery finish. I'm already smooth-gravy challenged, but reading here
    >tells me the roux first method for the flour is best. I will do that for adding to the browned
    >sausage, but from my good Penzeys stock, what seasonings would any of you suggest?
    >
    > Picky ~JA~

    When I make Sausage Gravy I brown the meat really brown. Remember, originally when sausage was
    cooked as patties non-stick didn't exist although a well seasoned cast iron worked the same. The
    jist is the sausage was really cooked done, nearly black, and the gravy made from the fond that was
    left. Most gravies and sauces are made by deglazing the burned bits left on the bottom of the pan,
    thats where the flavor was developed, caramelzation if you will. So if you only cook the sausage til
    its a gray brown the real flavor isn't developed.

    To make a smooth gravy I add two to three tablespoons of flour to 1# of really browned sausage, a
    little salt, a little black pepper if desired, (I like a little crushed red pepper) and usually a
    little butter because today's sausage is so lean that there isn't enought fat to cook the flour.
    Cook the flour and sauasage three or four minutes until the flour starts to turn a little blonde,
    then add the cold milk and stir thourghly until you start to get a few bubbles forming before a full
    boil. Don't cook at a rolling boil, that's too much, but it needs to come to a rolling boil before
    turning down to a simmer. The longer you simmer the gravy the thicker it will get

    Did you know that if you place the split biscuits cut side down before putting the gravy on that
    they are easier to cut with a fork and then the split side is down for mopping up more gravy.

    John W

    [email protected]
     
  7. Jmcquown

    Jmcquown Guest

    elaine wrote:
    > Could you tell me what kind of biscuits you make. I've never heard of sausage gravy, sounds great
    > though. Would that be a breakfast thing??
    > E.
    >
    A white gravy made with cooked ground pork sausage and a roux made with the drippings and milk or
    cream... yes, a breakfast thing in the Southern U.S. Very tasty.

    Jill
     
  8. Dawn

    Dawn Guest

    Richard's ~JA~ wrote:

    > I'm already smooth-gravy challenged, but reading here tells me the roux first method for the
    > flour is best. I will do that for adding to the browned sausage, but from my good Penzeys stock,
    > what seasonings would any of you suggest?

    If your sausage is well seasoned you won't need to add anything. Find a sausage you like, or ask the
    out-of-business guys what they used since you liked that. I would bet they added almost nothing to
    it except salt and pepper to taste and maybe not even that.

    You don't need a roux, just brown up the sausage, drain it some if it is really swimming in grease,
    and then sprinkle on flour by the spoonful until it starts to look kind of dry. Cook that a few
    minutes (you're doing the same thing you would with a roux) and then add your milk. Stir over heat
    until it just comes to desired thickness then pull it off the heat. It will thicken slightly as it
    cools to eating temperature.

    Dawn
     
  9. "Kate Connally" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > I just buy a 1-lb. log of Bob Evans "hot" bulk sausage. (or Jimmy Dean if there's not Bon Evans).
    > I brown the sausage and break it up. Then I just add about 6 T. flour to the pan and cook a little
    > to cook the flour and mix it well with the sausage grease. Then I add 1 qt. of cold milk and mix
    > well and bring it back up to heat. Cook until it thickens up and that's it. Best sausage gravy
    > I've ever eaten.
    <snip>

    This is how I make it too. If your sausage is well flavored so will your gravy be. I like to add a
    generous amount of black pepper as well.

    Charlie
     
  10. Peter Aitken

    Peter Aitken Guest

    "Dawn" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:eek:[email protected]...
    > Richard's ~JA~ wrote:
    >
    > > I'm already smooth-gravy challenged, but reading here tells me the roux first method for the
    > > flour is best. I will do that for adding to the browned sausage, but from my good Penzeys
    > > stock, what seasonings would any of you suggest?
    >
    > If your sausage is well seasoned you won't need to add anything. Find a sausage you like, or ask
    > the out-of-business guys what they used since you liked that. I would bet they added almost
    > nothing to it except salt and pepper to taste and maybe not even that.
    >

    I'll have to disagree. A good strong dose of black pepper is part of traditional sausage gravy IMO.
    The spicy types of sausage may have some bite of red pepper but it is not the same thing.

    --
    Peter Aitken

    Remove the crap from my email address before using.
     
  11. John W wrote:
    >
    > On Mon, 23 Feb 2004 09:15:53 -0800 (PST), [email protected] (Richard's ~JA~) wrote:
    >
    > >Please, the local shop aboard closed down leaving many of us to miss their sausage gravy over
    > >biscuits. I make great biscuits, but have no idea what seasonings should be added to any of the 1
    > >lb. amounts of common grocery store ground sausage. This shop did once say that is all they used,
    > >just plain ole ground sausage, but with a wink to tell it takes the right seasonings to end up
    > >with their not too salty, not too peppery finish. I'm already smooth-gravy challenged, but
    > >reading here tells me the roux first method for the flour is best. I will do that for adding to
    > >the browned sausage, but from my good Penzeys stock, what seasonings would any of you suggest?
    > >
    > > Picky ~JA~
    >
    > When I make Sausage Gravy I brown the meat really brown. Remember, originally when sausage was
    > cooked as patties non-stick didn't exist although a well seasoned cast iron worked the same. The
    > jist is the sausage was really cooked done, nearly black, and the gravy made from the fond that
    > was left. Most gravies and sauces are made by deglazing the burned bits left on the bottom of the
    > pan, thats where the flavor was developed, caramelzation if you will. So if you only cook the
    > sausage til its a gray brown the real flavor isn't developed.

    I always brown my sausage really well.

    > To make a smooth gravy I add two to three tablespoons of flour to 1# of really browned sausage,

    Unless you're using a lot less milk than I am (I use 1 qt.) I would think that would make a rather
    thin gravy. I like mine fairly thick. I guess it's a matter of taste.

    > a little salt, a little black pepper if desired, (I like a little crushed red pepper) and usually
    > a little butter because today's sausage is so lean that there isn't enought fat to cook the flour.

    When there's not enough fat I add some bacon fat from the stash in the fridge. I never throw away
    good bacon fat.

    > Cook the flour and sauasage three or four minutes until the flour starts to turn a little blonde,
    > then add the cold milk and stir thourghly until you start to get a few bubbles forming before a
    > full boil. Don't cook at a rolling boil, that's too much, but it needs to come to a rolling boil
    > before turning down to a simmer. The longer you simmer the gravy the thicker it will get
    >
    > Did you know that if you place the split biscuits cut side down before putting the gravy on that
    > they are easier to cut with a fork and then the split side is down for mopping up more gravy.

    Unless they're fresh from the oven, I like to split the biscuits and toast them in the toaster oven
    and then butter them. And I also often put a fried egg on top and put the gravy over all. I don't
    usually have to "mop" up the gravy since mine is fairly thick and will stay on the fork when you
    scoop up a bite.

    Kate

    --
    Kate Connally “If I were as old as I feel, I’d be dead already.” Goldfish: “The wholesome snack that
    smiles back, Until you bite their heads off.” What if the hokey pokey really *is* what it's all
    about? mailto:[email protected]
     
  12. Richard's ~JA~ wrote:
    >
    > Elaine asks....
    > >Could you tell me what kind of biscuits you make. I've never heard of sausage gravy, sounds great
    > >though. Would that be a breakfast thing??
    > I have always had rave reviews on my airy-tender biscuits, and I find that a bit comical. I've
    > always simply made them from the buttermilk biscuit method found on the back of the Bisquick box,

    I would not recommend Bisquick biscuits. Bisquick makes things too salty and often has an unpleasant
    slight bitterness to it due to the leavening agent. Although lots of people love stuff made from
    Bisquick. My aunt uses it all the time. Depending on the recipe I can sometimes eat it, but for
    biscuits I find the taste unpleasant and too salty. However, note that I have never liked anything
    heavily salted and I have a sensitivity to bitter tastes.

    Kate

    --
    Kate Connally “If I were as old as I feel, I’d be dead already.” Goldfish: “The wholesome snack that
    smiles back, Until you bite their heads off.” What if the hokey pokey really *is* what it's all
    about? mailto:[email protected]
     
  13. Peter Aitken wrote:
    >
    > "Dawn" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:eek:[email protected]
    > kc.rr.com...
    > > Richard's ~JA~ wrote:
    > >
    > > > I'm already smooth-gravy challenged, but reading here tells me the roux first method for the
    > > > flour is best. I will do that for adding to the browned sausage, but from my good Penzeys
    > > > stock, what seasonings would any of you suggest?
    > >
    > > If your sausage is well seasoned you won't need to add anything. Find a sausage you like, or ask
    > > the out-of-business guys what they used since you liked that. I would bet they added almost
    > > nothing to it except salt and pepper to taste and maybe not even that.
    > >
    >
    > I'll have to disagree. A good strong dose of black pepper is part of traditional sausage gravy
    > IMO. The spicy types of sausage may have some bite of red pepper but it is not the same thing.

    So, then add black pepper if you want. I like mine fine without. But as far as the total amount of
    seasoning you shouldn't need anymore than what's in the sausage. Especially not more salt. If I use
    regular sausage instead of the hot variety I do add more pepper and sometimes hot red pepper flakes
    as I like that even if it's not traditional.

    Kate

    --
    Kate Connally “If I were as old as I feel, I’d be dead already.” Goldfish: “The wholesome snack that
    smiles back, Until you bite their heads off.” What if the hokey pokey really *is* what it's all
    about? mailto:[email protected]
     
  14. John W

    John W Guest

    On Tue, 24 Feb 2004 14:58:30 -0500, Kate Connally <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >John W wrote:
    >>
    >> On Mon, 23 Feb 2004 09:15:53 -0800 (PST), [email protected] (Richard's ~JA~) wrote:
    >>
    >> >Please, the local shop aboard closed down leaving many of us to miss their sausage gravy over
    >> >biscuits. I make great biscuits, but have no idea what seasonings should be added to any of the
    >> >1 lb. amounts of common grocery store ground sausage. This shop did once say that is all they
    >> >used, just plain ole ground sausage, but with a wink to tell it takes the right seasonings to
    >> >end up with their not too salty, not too peppery finish. I'm already smooth-gravy challenged,
    >> >but reading here tells me the roux first method for the flour is best. I will do that for adding
    >> >to the browned sausage, but from my good Penzeys stock, what seasonings would any of you
    >> >suggest?
    >> >
    >> > Picky ~JA~
    >>
    >> When I make Sausage Gravy I brown the meat really brown. Remember, originally when sausage was
    >> cooked as patties non-stick didn't exist although a well seasoned cast iron worked the same. The
    >> jist is the sausage was really cooked done, nearly black, and the gravy made from the fond that
    >> was left. Most gravies and sauces are made by deglazing the burned bits left on the bottom of the
    >> pan, thats where the flavor was developed, caramelzation if you will. So if you only cook the
    >> sausage til its a gray brown the real flavor isn't developed.
    >
    >I always brown my sausage really well.
    >
    >> To make a smooth gravy I add two to three tablespoons of flour to 1# of really browned sausage,
    >
    >Unless you're using a lot less milk than I am (I use 1 qt.) I would think that would make a rather
    >thin gravy. I like mine fairly thick. I guess it's a matter of taste.
    >
    >> a little salt, a little black pepper if desired, (I like a little crushed red pepper) and
    >> usually a little butter because today's sausage is so lean that there isn't enought fat to cook
    >> the flour.
    >
    >When there's not enough fat I add some bacon fat from the stash in the fridge. I never throw away
    >good bacon fat.
    >
    >> Cook the flour and sauasage three or four minutes until the flour starts to turn a little blonde,
    >> then add the cold milk and stir thourghly until you start to get a few bubbles forming before a
    >> full boil. Don't cook at a rolling boil, that's too much, but it needs to come to a rolling boil
    >> before turning down to a simmer. The longer you simmer the gravy the thicker it will get
    >>
    >> Did you know that if you place the split biscuits cut side down before putting the gravy on that
    >> they are easier to cut with a fork and then the split side is down for mopping up more gravy.
    >
    >Unless they're fresh from the oven, I like to split the biscuits and toast them in the toaster oven
    >and then butter them. And I also often put a fried egg on top and put the gravy over all. I don't
    >usually have to "mop" up the gravy since mine is fairly thick and will stay on the fork when you
    >scoop up a bite.
    >
    >Kate

    Truth be told, I don't measure my flour. I just put in what I think is right and and some milk. I
    too like my gravy on the thick side so I probably let the rolling boil go on for a few minutes.

    The last time I made sausage gravy I made a 3 1/2 qt crockpot full to take to work. (And 3 dozen 3"
    Biskquick biscuits, butter brushed tops also). Boy did that "Food Day" offering go over big time.

    I don't usually have bacon grease around but you're right it would be far superior to butter.

    John W
     
  15. Peter Aitken

    Peter Aitken Guest

    "Kate Connally" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Richard's ~JA~ wrote:
    > >
    > > Elaine asks....
    > > >Could you tell me what kind of biscuits you make. I've never heard of sausage gravy, sounds
    > > >great though. Would that be a breakfast thing??
    > > I have always had rave reviews on my airy-tender biscuits, and I find that a bit comical.
    > > I've always simply made them from the buttermilk biscuit method found on the back of the
    > > Bisquick box,
    >
    > I would not recommend Bisquick biscuits. Bisquick makes things too salty and often has an
    > unpleasant slight bitterness to it due to the leavening agent. Although lots of people love stuff
    > made from Bisquick. My aunt uses it all the time. Depending on the recipe I can sometimes eat it,
    > but for biscuits I find the taste unpleasant and too salty. However, note that I have never liked
    > anything heavily salted and I have a sensitivity to bitter tastes.
    >
    > Kate
    >
    > --

    I agree. I do not see the appeal of bisquick - it saves you a minute of time at best and gives
    inferior results.

    --
    Peter Aitken

    Remove the crap from my email address before using.
     
  16. Ferrante

    Ferrante Guest

    On Mon, 23 Feb 2004 13:12:25 -0500, Kate Connally <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >> Picky ~JA~
    >
    >I just buy a 1-lb. log of Bob Evans "hot" bulk sausage. (or Jimmy Dean if there's not Bon Evans). I
    >brown the sausage and break it up. Then I just add about 6 T. flour to the pan and cook a little to
    >cook the flour and mix it well with the sausage grease. Then I add 1 qt. of cold milk and mix well
    >and bring it back up to heat.

    One quart of milk seems like an awful lot of liquid. I usually just add a bowl full of milk or so.

    Also, I found while grocery shopping that Swason has Sausage Gravy in a can. I bought two cans and
    to be honest, I was very skeptical as to how it would taste. But it is VERY GOOD! Nice gravy and
    lots of sausage. Also, if I am in a hurry, I just make about 4 pieces of buttered toast and pour
    the sausage gravy over it. Grind some fresh pepper and the results are remarkable. I just love
    assuage gravy.

    Btw, I was very surprised to find that several of the McDonalds Restaurants in our area offer
    sausage gravy over biscuits. It is very good.

    Mark Ferrante
     
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