Help with Schwinn Bottom Bracket Job?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by geardad, Jun 20, 2007.

  1. geardad

    geardad New Member

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    My wife's Schwinn sidewinder's BB is pretty much toast...the cranks rock a lot with prbly about 1/8" of play or more. it's the orig. BB, so...doesn't owe her anything.

    a local shop wants $100 to replace it (part included) and we think that is pretty exotic pricing for that job.

    I thought I'd tackle it myself, but wanted advice both on the job and on tools I'd need for this *particular* bike. This schwinn has a chainring/spider config that's welded and riveted together, not assembled with hex nuts as you find on better bikes.

    I'm thinking I need to unscrew the cranks, but might need a tool to actually get them off. then there's that notched ring that requires a tool that resembles a curved finger with a "tooth" on it (the tooth engages the notch) which we don't have, but I figure I might squeak by with some judicious tapping on a screwdriver.

    anyhoo, I have 3 links showing what I'm up against. Appreciate any advice anyone can give. We'd rather not shell out the big bucks for what ought to be a job that we can do ourselves.

    Thank you!

    geardad


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  2. gclark8

    gclark8 New Member

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    You will need to buy tools and a sealed Bottom Bracket. It may be cheaper for the LBS to do the job. :(
     
  3. kdelong

    kdelong Well-Known Member

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    Standard Crank Puller: $14.00
    8-inch Crescent Wrench: $8.00
    Park Tools Spanner Wrench: $18.00
    Sealed BB Cartridge: $28.00
    BB Cartridge Tool: $15.00
    Knowing that you did it yourself: Priceless
    Actually you might be better off taking it to the bike shop. If you live in south western Ohio, I'll do it for the cost of the BB Cartridge and a beer. Oh, and the gas to and from:) .
     
  4. geardad

    geardad New Member

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    heh! now THAT's a DEAL!

    the picture I'm getting is that we might as well look on CL for a decent used set of wheels...I hate wussing out on a bike repair, but money doesn't come out of the faucet, and this bike might not be worth many repairs in a sense....

    gd
     
  5. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    18 bearings @ ~10ยข each + grease + tools & time ... so, $100 is a bit steep unless that includes a surf-and-turf dinner for two.

    A new spindle (presuming you don't opt for a cartridge BB -- an excellent suggestion at this point) will cost about $10-to-whatever IF the current one is pitted and needs replacement (not absolutely necessary ... the condition of the cups is probably more important ...).

    If you have zero tools, then those ~$40 toolkits that come in a hard case have EVERYTHING you need for most routine maintenance on most bikes ... some of the tools are of marginal quality (soft steel), some are equal-to or better than PARK.

    The current "toolkit(s)" generally have the tool for Shimano-compatible cartridge BBs (get a 105-or-better grade ... e.g., UN-71, generally a 113mm long spindle for a steel framed bike works). SOME square tapers are Campagnolo-/Sugino-compatible and theoretically NOT Shimano-compatible, but you CAN mount them on a Shimano tapered BB spindle (the crankarms & chainrings will subsequently sit about 2mm further outboard).
     
  6. david462

    david462 New Member

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    it may just need new bearings (if it uses unsealed)

    if you have a dicks sporting goods nearby (or even within 50 miles) take it there. i work at one as a bike tech, and we do all the services an LBS will do for way less. i actually had to fix this same problem on a bike today, charged them $20 for the service and $5 for new bearings.
     
  7. garage sale GT

    garage sale GT New Member

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    I recommend using a pipe wrench to undo the bearing cups and lockrings because you won't need to do it again so why buy a special tool? Don't forget the left one is left hand threaded.

    Your new BB will probably require a different tool.

    You will need to get a crank puller though, to get the crankarms off. If you were replacing the crank I would try to ghetto it because you only the puller for crankarm removal, not installation.
     
  8. garage sale GT

    garage sale GT New Member

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    The current sealed bbs require a splined removal tool with a 1/2" drive to fit their internal splines.

    If you really want to be the ghetto king, saw through the bb spindle between crank and bearing cup, place the crankarm with bolt facing upward on a 2X4 with a hole drilled in it under the spindle and crank bolt, remove the crank bolt, and drive the remnant of the spindle out with hammer and punch. Then, buy the same style bb you had before, $7.99 from Pyramid Pro, and install it using a pipe wrench to adjust the bearings. It will hack up the lockrings. Let it. :D

    I have put more than a few miles on a bike with this mega-kluge install, though it had cotters rather than square taper, so my crank removal method is not tested.
     
  9. garage sale GT

    garage sale GT New Member

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    My kluge method of installing an old-style cup-and-cone bb has the drawback of requiring you to adjust ball bearing clearance using the wrong tools. Besides the cosmetic damage to the bearing cups and lockrings, it may not last too long for that reason.

    This is a big advantage to a modern bb. The cups and cones are in a sealed cartridge and do not require the installer to set precise clearances.
     
  10. p38lightning

    p38lightning New Member

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    Keep in mind that those bolts in the middle of the crank arm can come in 2 different sizes, 14 AND 15 millimeter. The great majority are 14MM and Park and most tool manufacturers tools are in that size. But you may buy the tool and find it's 15MM and won't work. A regular socket has too great an outside diameter to fit on so that you can size it, but may still be the best alternative. Get a cheap socket stick it on an extension and grind down the outside while rotating it against the grinding wheel. Make sure that you remove enough so that the socket wont rub on the treads in the crank arm hole when you are able to fit it on the bolt head. These work great and can be used with a torque wrench when you reinstall.
     
  11. kdelong

    kdelong Well-Known Member

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    It has been 30 years since I encountered a 15 mm crank arm bolt. Removed them with an EZ Out. I didn't think that they made them anymore precisely for the reason that you stated, no one makes a tool that will fit it.
     
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