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Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by wearethetide, Aug 10, 2009.

  1. wearethetide

    wearethetide New Member

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    So, I have just recently really become interested in cycling, and I have an old Raleigh that I bought off someone for $25 bucks, but after using it to the point of no return, it's starting to fall apart. Therefore, I need a new bike. I just recently found the frame to what I believe to be an old UO-8 Peugeot in my attic, and I'm considering rebuilding it. However, I have no idea where to even begin in this process and am looking for any advice on the topic.

    Whatever you can offer in the form of information is wonderful.

    Thanks!
     
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  2. Peter@vecchios

    [email protected] New Member

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    To big gotchas for this frame is French threading of the BB and probably a non standard stem(20mm vs the more comon 22.2mm). If the stem is proper length and the BB/crank are OK, all the other stuff is fairly standard, even if it has 27 inch rather than 700c wheels. See a decent bike shop and ask.
     
  3. shaun72

    shaun72 New Member

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    I would have the frame thoroughly checked, make sure nil hairline cracks at all around all welds on the frame, especially with the age of the frame. Could present a serious danger once built...... I personally would scour the trading post, local papers, ebay and the like and get yourself measured for frame size, so that once you have the measurements that are for your size, you can narrow the possibilities. You will then have a better idea of the correct frame size, and then you can choose the one you like best and suits your budget...
    This would be the track I would go down first up, as rebuilding a bike can be just as, if not more expensive than buying a used top of the range, or middle/lower end brand new bike!
    SHAUN
     
  4. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    For 1974-1979. Does this look familiar?
     
  5. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    SHELDON BROWN's website has information on updating French bikes -- French Bicycles by Sheldon Brown.

    Also: French_Bikes

    You have to decide how much money you want to spend AND how much effort you want to undertake.
     
  6. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    BTW. The headset bearings are probably loose ... NO cage ... so, the bike should be UPSIDE-DOWN if-and-when you plan on removing the fork.
     
  7. garage sale GT

    garage sale GT New Member

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    Velo Orange has french thread cartridge bbs. It is easy to put in an English size quill stem; you just have to sand it down like it says on sheldonbrown.com, the site mentioned above.

    HOWEVER, that stuff adds up. The UO-8 was an entry level bike.

    I would spend a bit of money on it only if I liked it and only if tenspeeds are pricey in your area due to fixie conversion. You could probabaly easily score a working tenspeed for less than you'd spend on a rehab. That stuff can add up pretty quickly.

    There is a big bonus to French bikes for those of us with shorter legs and long torsos and arms. They fit better. They typically have a longer top tube relative to their seat tube length than other makes.
     
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