hematocrit levels

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Race170, Mar 6, 2004.

  1. Race170

    Race170 Guest

    Does anyone know the normal range of fluctuation for
    hematocrit levels in the blood and whether those levelscan
    be improve with aerobic training? Thanks - Fred B.
     
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  2. "Race170" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Does anyone know the normal range of fluctuation for
    > hematocrit levels in
    the
    > blood and whether those levelscan be improve with aerobic
    > training?
    Thanks -
    > Fred B.

    Hematocrit normally decreases with increased aerobic
    fitness.
     
  3. mjh

    mjh New Member

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    Check out the same topic on the "Health, Nutrition and Suplements" thread.

    mjh
     
  4. Robert Chung

    Robert Chung Guest

    Carl Sundquist wrote:
    >
    > Hematocrit normally decreases with increased aerobic
    > fitness.

    So you're saying that in Arkansas blood is *way* thicker
    than water.
     
  5. Chris

    Chris Guest

    I would say that the verdict is still out because increases
    in plasma volume would increase venous return (indirectly)
    and end diastolic volume and hence stroke volume. IF stroke
    volume continues to increase until max (I've not seen much
    on this in recent years, though one study comes to mind) in
    athletes, which is still open to debate I believe, then
    increase PV could imporve performance. But I'll have to do a
    more thorough search.

    CH
     
  6. Tom Kunich

    Tom Kunich Guest

    "Race170" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Does anyone know the normal range of fluctuation for
    > hematocrit levels in
    the
    > blood and whether those levelscan be improve with aerobic
    > training?
    Thanks -

    The normal range is something like 37% to 47%, but extremes
    are something like 28% to 54%. Anything outside of the
    normal range normally means something is wrong.

    Aerobic training doesn't by itself change your hematocrit
    values though over time your increased musclature can cause
    an overall increase in blood volume and hence a decrease in
    hematocrit. Anaerobic training can modify it somewhat by
    causing RBC's to age prematurely.
     
  7. Sam

    Sam Guest

    "Tom Kunich" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "Race170" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    > m24.aol.com...
    > > Does anyone know the normal range of fluctuation for
    > > hematocrit levels
    in
    > the
    > > blood and whether those levelscan be improve with
    > > aerobic training?
    > Thanks -
    >
    > The normal range is something like 37% to 47%, but
    > extremes are something like 28% to 54%. Anything outside
    > of the normal range normally means something is wrong.
    >
    > Aerobic training doesn't by itself change your hematocrit
    > values though
    over
    > time your increased musclature can cause an overall
    > increase in blood
    volume
    > and hence a decrease in hematocrit. Anaerobic training can
    > modify it somewhat by causing RBC's to age prematurely.
    >
    Wrong, endurance training will increase plasma volume and
    also increased red cell mass; the former will increase by a
    greater amount so hematocrit will decrease. It has nothing
    to do musclature.

    Normal ranges will vary from lab to lab. One reference
    range is 38 to 52% for males (slightly smaller values
    for females).
     
  8. DiabloScott

    DiabloScott New Member

    Joined:
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    I get mine measured along with a bunch of other blood work for annual physicals. The lab lists 40.0 to 54.0% as the normal range. I was between 50 and 51% twice in the last 7 years (probably dehydrated).
     
  9. Tom Kunich

    Tom Kunich Guest

    "Sam" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:70O2c.1115$%[email protected]...
    >
    > "Tom Kunich" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:-
    > [email protected]
    > > "Race170" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    > > m24.aol.com...
    > > > Does anyone know the normal range of fluctuation for
    > > > hematocrit levels
    > in
    > > the
    > > > blood and whether those levelscan be improve with
    > > > aerobic training?
    > > Thanks -
    > >
    > > The normal range is something like 37% to 47%, but
    > > extremes are
    something
    > > like 28% to 54%. Anything outside of the normal range
    > > normally means something is wrong.
    > >
    > > Aerobic training doesn't by itself change your
    > > hematocrit values though
    > over
    > > time your increased musclature can cause an overall
    > > increase in blood
    > volume
    > > and hence a decrease in hematocrit. Anaerobic training
    > > can modify it somewhat by causing RBC's to age
    > > prematurely.
    > >
    > Wrong, endurance training will increase plasma volume and
    > also increased
    red
    > cell mass; the former will increase by a greater amount so
    > hematocrit
    will
    > decrease. It has nothing to do musclature.

    Increased musclature goes hand in hand with increased venous
    volume. Plasma vloume generally rises faster than the cell
    count. The result is generally that in athletes you SHOULD
    see lower RBC than in non-athletic types. But that is all a
    bit murky because the data is so variable.

    > Normal ranges will vary from lab to lab. One reference
    > range is 38 to 52% for males (slightly smaller values for
    > females).

    Over 47% or so isn't "normal" in that the higher values are
    found in people who live at high altitude and people with
    lung deficiencies such as emphasema or other medical
    conditions. Most cases of emphasema are slight enough that
    they are symptomatic save that there is a higher than normal
    (for that individual) RBC count.

    Note that many endurance athletes live at high altitude to
    get this boost and in the case of cyclists they can get a
    doctors statement to allow as high as 52% hematocrit.

    One thing to be aware of is that hematocit in and of itself
    DOES NOT demonstrate enhanced endurance. Well trained and
    healthy athletes with hematocrits which are quite low, such
    as in the low 40's, have won races while walking away from
    the competition.

    The important thing is the blood's ability to carry oxygen,
    an athlete might have a high TOTAL RBC count and a lower
    hematicrit due to high plasma volume. And a heavily
    dehydrated athlete can measure very high hematicrits which
    DO NOT provide higher than normal endurance.

    So it is a hell of a lot more complicated than simply
    quoting hematocrit values.
     
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