Here's a study for you, doe/Tom.

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Nick, Nov 27, 2003.

  1. Nick

    Nick Guest

    Looks like cadmium has dangerous qualities, similar to iron. However, from the evidence currently
    available (and that's all "science" can be, apart from the interpretation by "experts") it seems
    clear that if most Americans did not have so much PUFAs stored in their bodies and in their diets,
    there would be much less of a problem, if there was a problem at all (probably just for those who
    worked in environments that exposed them to massive amounts of iron, cadmium, or some other metal
    like them). In particular, those who eat little PUFAs (today they are known as "essential fatty acid
    deficient," even though this makes little sense, and even if there was evidence to support it, one
    would have to ask why it's only been about a decade that the public has been informed of this,
    considering the flawed experiments on rats that supposedly established the fatty acids'
    "essentiality" was done over 60 years ago), incorporate the stable Mead acids instead of the highly
    unstable arachidonic acid in the cells of their bodies. If you've got the Mead acids working for
    you, your body is much less reactive, and that's includes conditions as mundane as common
    "allergies," such as sensitivity to dustmite feces. As I said before, I agree with you that iron (as
    well as cadmium and some other metals) can be dangerous, but there needs to be some highly reactive
    substances in your body (another is oxidized cholesterol) in order to cause major health problems.

    Molecular Biology Reports 24 (1/2) p.35-38 1997

    Accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins in mouse neuronal cells induced by oxidative stress
    Figueiredo-Pereira Maria E.1 Yakushin Svetlana2 and Cohen Gerald2 Ubiquitin protein conjugates are
    commonly detected in neuronal brain inclusions of patients with neurodegenerative disorders. The
    failure to eliminate the ubiquitin-protein deposits in the degenerating neurons may result from
    changes in the activity of the ubiquitin/ATP-dependent proteolytic pathway. This proteolytic pathway
    plays a major role in the degradation of short lived, abnormal and denatured proteins. Cadmium is a
    potent cell poison and is known to affect the ubiquitin pathway and to cause oxidative stress.
    Increases in protein mixed-disulfides (Pr-SSG) and decreases in glutathione (GSH) are often used as
    markers of oxidative stress. To investigate the relationship between the ubiquitin pathway and
    cellular glutathione (GSH), we treated HT4 cells (a mouse neuronal cell line) and rat mesencephalic
    primary cultures with different concentrations of the heavy metal. We observed marked increases in
    Pr-SSG as well as decreases in GSH, after exposure of HT4 cells or primary mesencephalic cultures to
    Cd^{2+}. Furthermore, our results show that Cd^{2+} induced the accumulation of ubiquitinated
    proteins. Detection was by Western blotting of total cell extracts probed with antibodies that
    recognize ubiquitin-protein conjugates. These results suggest that the ubiquitin-pathway is closely
    involved in the cell response to cadmium-mediated oxidative stress. Abbreviations: GSH -
    glutathione; GSSG - glutathione disulfide; Pr-SSG - protein mixed disulfides.
     
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  2. Doe

    Doe Guest

    >Subject: Here's a study for you, doe/Tom. From: "nick" [email protected] Date: 11/24/2003 10:10 PM
    >Mountain Standard Time Message-id: <IuBwb.38573$A%[email protected]>
    >
    >Looks like cadmium has dangerous qualities, similar to iron. However, from the evidence currently
    >available (and that's all "science" can be, apart from the interpretation by "experts") it seems
    >clear that if most Americans did not have so much PUFAs stored in their bodies and in their diets,
    >there would be much less of a problem, if there was a problem at all (probably just for those who
    >worked in environments that exposed them to massive amounts of iron, cadmium, or some other metal
    >like them). In particular, those who eat little PUFAs (today they are known as "essential fatty
    >acid deficient," even though this makes little sense, and even if there was evidence to support it,
    >one would have to ask why it's only been about a decade that the public has been informed of this,
    >considering the flawed experiments on rats that supposedly established the fatty acids'
    >"essentiality" was done over 60 years ago), incorporate the stable Mead acids instead of the highly
    >unstable arachidonic acid in the cells of their bodies. If you've got the Mead acids working for
    >you, your body is much less reactive, and that's includes conditions as mundane as common
    >"allergies," such as sensitivity to dustmite feces. As I said before, I agree with you that iron
    >(as well as cadmium and some other metals) can be dangerous, but there needs to be some highly
    >reactive substances in your body (another is oxidized cholesterol) in order to cause major health
    >problems.
    >
    >
    >Molecular Biology Reports 24 (1/2) p.35-38 1997
    >
    >Accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins in mouse neuronal cells induced by oxidative stress
    >Figueiredo-Pereira Maria E.1 Yakushin Svetlana2 and Cohen Gerald2 Ubiquitin protein conjugates are
    >commonly detected in neuronal brain inclusions of patients with neurodegenerative disorders. The
    >failure to eliminate the ubiquitin-protein deposits in the degenerating neurons may result from
    >changes in the activity of the ubiquitin/ATP-dependent proteolytic pathway. This proteolytic
    >pathway plays a major role in the degradation of short lived, abnormal and denatured proteins.
    >Cadmium is a potent cell poison and is known to affect the ubiquitin pathway and to cause oxidative
    >stress. Increases in protein mixed-disulfides (Pr-SSG) and decreases in glutathione (GSH) are often
    >used as markers of oxidative stress. To investigate the relationship between the ubiquitin pathway
    >and cellular glutathione (GSH), we treated HT4 cells (a mouse neuronal cell line) and rat
    >mesencephalic primary cultures with different concentrations of the heavy metal. We observed marked
    >increases in Pr-SSG as well as decreases in GSH, after exposure of HT4 cells or primary
    >mesencephalic cultures to Cd^{2+}. Furthermore, our results show that Cd^{2+} induced the
    >accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins. Detection was by Western blotting of total cell extracts
    >probed with antibodies that recognize ubiquitin-protein conjugates. These results suggest that the
    >ubiquitin-pathway is closely involved in the cell response to cadmium-mediated oxidative stress.
    >Abbreviations: GSH - glutathione; GSSG - glutathione disulfide; Pr-SSG - protein mixed disulfides.
    >

    As you said though the reality is .. not too many of use live near smelters ..

    The reality is everyone seems to be subjected to oxidative stress .. IE: Linus Pauling and the more
    likely of a scenario is the elevation of iron from the consumption of meat which has been shown to
    rise and fall as PER .. amount .. of meat consumed.

    As evidenced in studies the rise of iron in the body is inevitable in meateaters but in vegetarians
    the rise in iron levels is not.. inevitable.

    'Rise' being considered to be anything higher than a 'mean' marker found commonly in premenopausal
    women and vegetarians.

    Who loves ya. Tom

    Who loves ya. Tom

    Jesus Was A Vegetarian! http://jesuswasavegetarian.7h.com Man Is A Herbivore!
    http://pages.ivillage.com/ironjustice/manisaherbivore DEAD PEOPLE WALKING
    http://pages.ivillage.com/ironjustice/deadpeoplewalking
     
  3. nick <[email protected]> wrote:
    : Looks like cadmium has dangerous qualities, similar to iron.

    Speaking of cadmium, my Critical Care nursing text that i'm reading this term says that it is
    cadmium that helps give smokers hypertension.

    I thought that was interesting.

    Emma
     
  4. On 26 Nov 2003 20:42:05 GMT, Emma Chase VanCott <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Speaking of cadmium, my Critical Care nursing text that i'm reading this term says that it is
    >cadmium that helps give smokers hypertension.

    Cigarettes contain about 50 ug cadmium pr cigarette.

    Cadmium binds to sulfhydryl groups and selenide groups in enzyme and inactivates them very
    effectively, just like mercury. One of the enzymes killed are the enzymes involved in GSSG -> GSH
    recycling, a selenium dependent enzyme, thioredoxine reductase.
     
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