High Altitude Navigation



A

Andyp

Guest
> Now would the people concerned have wanted the extra
> weight of a GPS receiver when they were already planning
> to be out near the limits of their ability. And would they
> have had the mental / physical ability to use one later
> when they needed to get back to shelter in extreme
> conditions at the end of a long day...

Cameras are commonly taken and used.
 
A

Andyp

Guest
> Now would the people concerned have wanted the extra
> weight of a GPS receiver when they were already planning
> to be out near the limits of their ability. And would they
> have had the mental / physical ability to use one later
> when they needed to get back to shelter in extreme
> conditions at the end of a long day...

Cameras are commonly taken and used.
 
C

Carl

Guest
> Now would the people concerned have wanted the extra
> weight of a GPS receiver when they were already planning
> to be out near the limits of their ability.

In the South Africans (Woodall/O'Dowd) book that accounts
for their time on Everest during the year in question, Cathy
O'Dowd had a walkman and listened to music in the tent to
pass the time. I forget which camp this was but it was above
base camp, and it doesnt say if it was her or a sherpa that
carried it, but I was amazed that such a luxury was taken.
 
C

Carl

Guest
> Now would the people concerned have wanted the extra
> weight of a GPS receiver when they were already planning
> to be out near the limits of their ability.

In the South Africans (Woodall/O'Dowd) book that accounts
for their time on Everest during the year in question, Cathy
O'Dowd had a walkman and listened to music in the tent to
pass the time. I forget which camp this was but it was above
base camp, and it doesnt say if it was her or a sherpa that
carried it, but I was amazed that such a luxury was taken.
 
P

Peter

Guest
I've done ome high altitude stuff where we ran a rope to the
toilet from where we wree lol - a 300m walk - in 8000+
conditions... a rope would help...

most of the people up there - shouldnt have been - it had
been coming for a long while

Peter

still a tragedy though

news:[email protected]...
> In article <[email protected]>, AndyP <[email protected]
> spam.co.uk> writes

> >
> >> Now would the people concerned have wanted the extra
> >> weight of a GPS receiver when they were already
> >> planning to be out near the limits of their ability.
> >> And would they have had the mental / physical ability
> >> to use one later when they needed to get back to
> >> shelter in extreme conditions at the end of a long
> >> day...
> >
> >Cameras are commonly taken and used.
>
> I don't think one would need to be Paul Saunders to find
> it a necessity to take a camera on a walk like that!
>
>
> --
>

> http://www.dscs.demon.co.uk/

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Virus Database: 398 - Release Date: 10/03/2004
 
P

Peter

Guest
I've done ome high altitude stuff where we ran a rope to the
toilet from where we wree lol - a 300m walk - in 8000+
conditions... a rope would help...

most of the people up there - shouldnt have been - it had
been coming for a long while

Peter

still a tragedy though

news:[email protected]...
> In article <[email protected]>, AndyP <[email protected]
> spam.co.uk> writes

> >
> >> Now would the people concerned have wanted the extra
> >> weight of a GPS receiver when they were already
> >> planning to be out near the limits of their ability.
> >> And would they have had the mental / physical ability
> >> to use one later when they needed to get back to
> >> shelter in extreme conditions at the end of a long
> >> day...
> >
> >Cameras are commonly taken and used.
>
> I don't think one would need to be Paul Saunders to find
> it a necessity to take a camera on a walk like that!
>
>
> --
>

> http://www.dscs.demon.co.uk/

---
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-
virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). Version: 6.0.619 /
Virus Database: 398 - Release Date: 10/03/2004
 
C

Chris Malcolm

Guest
Gordon <[email protected]> writes:

>Andy Howell <[email protected]> wrote
>>On 10/3/04 5:21 pm, in article
>>[email protected], "Mark South"
>><[email protected]> wrote:

>>> And if you go by the descriptions given by Krakauer,
>>> most of the party were babes in the wood who would have
>>> had difficulties surviving getting up and down Mam Tor
>>> on a sunny day in July from the upper car park....
>>
>>Kraujauer's book was spooky. Who on earth would turn up to
>>Everest base camp either never having worn their boots
>>before or never having used crampon? !!!

>My first day's hill walking was over the Langdale Pikes,
>with a group from work, one of who wore a lounge suit, and
>ordinary shoes, and (sensibly!) a smart raincoat. He made
>the full trip. Another guy had brought along his
>girlfriend, forgetting to mention that she had an
>artificial foot. She made it as far as the tarn,
>(Stickle?), before letting the leader know she was
>struggling, bless her heart, and they had to be escorted
>down to the valley before we continued around the tops,
>although we had to abandon the planned walk.

If you're organising remote expeditions with people from all
over the country, or world, it can be difficult to
physically inspect their gear and test their expertise
before they arrive, and if you're relying on self-certified
competence, some of them will lie their heads off.

If I was organising such a remote expedition with unknown
self-certified folk I'd insist on some kind of induction
preliminary test to discover who weren't up to it, and that
all had agreed they would get left behind of they were tried
and found incompetent.

Just with my own friends and relatives I've been startled
by the extent to which some people will offer up
completely barefaced lies about competence and clothes
etc. just because they want to go and think you're being
an old fuss pot.

--
Chris Malcolm [email protected] +44 (0)131 651 3445 DoD #205
IPAB, Informatics, JCMB, King's Buildings, Edinburgh, EH9 3JZ, UK
[http://www.dai.ed.ac.uk/homes/cam/]
 
C

Chris Malcolm

Guest
Gordon <[email protected]> writes:

>Andy Howell <[email protected]> wrote
>>On 10/3/04 5:21 pm, in article
>>[email protected], "Mark South"
>><[email protected]> wrote:

>>> And if you go by the descriptions given by Krakauer,
>>> most of the party were babes in the wood who would have
>>> had difficulties surviving getting up and down Mam Tor
>>> on a sunny day in July from the upper car park....
>>
>>Kraujauer's book was spooky. Who on earth would turn up to
>>Everest base camp either never having worn their boots
>>before or never having used crampon? !!!

>My first day's hill walking was over the Langdale Pikes,
>with a group from work, one of who wore a lounge suit, and
>ordinary shoes, and (sensibly!) a smart raincoat. He made
>the full trip. Another guy had brought along his
>girlfriend, forgetting to mention that she had an
>artificial foot. She made it as far as the tarn,
>(Stickle?), before letting the leader know she was
>struggling, bless her heart, and they had to be escorted
>down to the valley before we continued around the tops,
>although we had to abandon the planned walk.

If you're organising remote expeditions with people from all
over the country, or world, it can be difficult to
physically inspect their gear and test their expertise
before they arrive, and if you're relying on self-certified
competence, some of them will lie their heads off.

If I was organising such a remote expedition with unknown
self-certified folk I'd insist on some kind of induction
preliminary test to discover who weren't up to it, and that
all had agreed they would get left behind of they were tried
and found incompetent.

Just with my own friends and relatives I've been startled
by the extent to which some people will offer up
completely barefaced lies about competence and clothes
etc. just because they want to go and think you're being
an old fuss pot.

--
Chris Malcolm [email protected] +44 (0)131 651 3445 DoD #205
IPAB, Informatics, JCMB, King's Buildings, Edinburgh, EH9 3JZ, UK
[http://www.dai.ed.ac.uk/homes/cam/]