High Priced OLDER Bikes??

Discussion in 'The Bike Cafe' started by AmpedCycle, Jan 2, 2005.

  1. AmpedCycle

    AmpedCycle New Member

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    I've seen a few of my friends go out and spend 800+ dollars on really old bikes. I don't get it. It's not for nostalgia, I know that much. Why not go out and buy a solid new bike, for the same money?
     
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  2. Cyclist14

    Cyclist14 New Member

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    I agree, I just spent $1300 (including pedals and shoes) on a Trek 1500 and there is no way I would spend that much for an old bike.
     
  3. frequentflyer

    frequentflyer New Member

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    you know i started out wanting nothing but old bikes and parts. things were just made more beautifully back then. and i love a bike held together by lugs and brazing and decked out with all chromed parts. i'm a fan of craftmanship. but i do think that these bikes should only be obtained after one has a bike that actually makes use of all the technology we have today. like the trek 1500. this is a perfectly good bike with parts that function im sure pretty close to perfection at a very reasonable price.
     
  4. p38lightning

    p38lightning New Member

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    Well for one thing if you an older non competitive rider like me the state of the art may not be what you're looking for. If you're also into steel frames as I am, the pinnacle of steel frame bike production was some time ago.

    I admire the wonderful carbon fiber and aluminum bikes of today, but truly love my lugged Columbus tubing Serotta (1991) with beautiful Campy C Record group. When stopped at a light there is often an exchange of mutual admiration between me and a younger rider on the latest and greatest bike, for our respective choices in cycle.
     
  5. PeterF

    PeterF New Member

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    I have a club buddy that has several state-of-the art road bikes (His best is a Serotta Ti with full Dura Ace). Yet the bike that shows up the most is an '82 Raleigh, similar to the one used by Fignon during one of his tour wins, with newer DA and Ultegra components. It's a beautiful lugged frame with fire engine red paint and lots of chrome. It's no lightweight (21-22 lbs), but he loves the ride, and he doesn't appear to be slowed down. I have a '91 Pinarello that is a joy to ride. As my oldest of three bikes, it has the lesser of the components, but it still sings along nicely on the road. I wouldn't part with it for less than $800.
    :cool:
     
  6. AmpedCycle

    AmpedCycle New Member

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    Forget you guys. I'll bet that my mid-low level 2005 specialized allez sport is faster and better handling than all those lugged beasts you keep nostalging over. Come on, get over it, live in the now!
    And no, I won't pay 800 for one of those damned beasts.
     
  7. JohnO

    JohnO New Member

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    My experience indicates otherwise.

    I have two road bikes right now - my space age, 17 pound, carbon beam framed Trek with Campy Chorus group. And a thirty year old Falcon San Remo, with Reynolds 531 frame and Campy Nuovo Record gear, still in perfect working order. (Try to find thirty year old Shimano gear that works at all, let alone perfectly)

    In weight, the Trek beats the Falcon by maybe 3-4 pounds. 17 verus 21, though you can get the Falcon down to 20 by replacing the Brooks Team Pro saddle with a lightweight CF saddle. Take the 404's off of the Trek, and the two bikes are virtually the same on the flats, except the Falcon has a smoother ride and handles a bit better. Give the Trek the nod on the downhills, due to the streamlined frame.

    Fit and finish? No contest there - the Trek, like most modern bikes today, looks like it was punched out with a cookie cutter, while the Falcon was finished with all the pride and attention to detail that one would normally expect to find in a Rolls Royce. Chromed stays and fork, Campy fork ends, and mirror smooth paint.

    Hate to think what I ended up putting into the Trek, probably around $3k over the last three years. The old Falcon set me back $500, and I certainly wouldn't trade it for a $1500 aluminum bike. Performs as well, rides a lot smoother, and looks classier. $800 for a Raleigh Professional, Schwinn Paramount, or *sigh* Masi, is actually a fairly decent deal.

    Aside from aero wheels and indexed shifters, bikes haven't changed all that much in the last thirty years. It would be interesting to get a cassette that could handle a 6 speed chain on my Zipps, put them on the Falcon, and see how it does.
     
  8. PeterF

    PeterF New Member

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    I do have an '04 Dedacciai 16.5 frame with carbon stays and full carbon fork, that is lighter and quicker than my old bike. But the '91 is still a lot of fun to ride, and I always get compliments on it's looks. Have you tried a nice lugged steel frame? They really do make for a smooth ride.
    :cool:
     
  9. wolfix

    wolfix New Member

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    I ride a old british frame with N.Record Campagnolo parts on it ..... I have logged and documented over 80,000 miles over 30 years...... Some of the parts have been replaced .... seat, handlebars, cables, chain, tires, and a rear hub...... The drivetrain is original........
    It still gets ridden about 10 hours a week and I appreciate it the most when I am about 80 miles into a century ride....
    Lugged beasts??? Tell that to Ernesto Colnago .......Bob Jackson.... The welders at the Ilkston plant of old Raleigh legends.....
    I am will to bet your Allez is not better handling ....... And faster has little to do with anything unless you are a competitor ......
    I am willing to bet my old lugged beasts will still be on the road when your Specialized bike is being melted down into beverage cans .....
    The only real reason to buy an aluminum bike is to enrich the owners of the modern cycle factories......
     
  10. artmichalek

    artmichalek New Member

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    New bikes aren't all that solid. Carbon and aluminum frames are intended to be disposable. A well built steel frame can be almost as light and if cared for last a lifetime.
     
  11. chch_legend

    chch_legend New Member

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    There is something truly elegant about the old retro bike, they don't make them like they used to. Have a look at a few of the websites dedicated to old school bikes, it is fantastic to see the number of people out there who are embracing the old steel frames.

    I ride a $6000 bike for my training and racing but am trying to find an old retro frame to set up as a single speed for the commute to work and brunch on the weekends. May even look at having a steel frame custom build for me.;)
     
  12. wolfix

    wolfix New Member

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    Racing is another story...... you are not looking for a lifetime bike..... 4 years ago , a riding buddy and I had this evening ride to our favorite pub about 10 miles away ...... He rode a really nice $ 3000 aluminum job and I rode my handbuilt British frame ..... One night on our way home I rode with out putting my hands on the bars ....... On this particular route there were very few cars..... Only once , and only because there was a car approaching from behind and when that happened we jumped upon the sidewalk, did I put my hands on the bars......
    After seeing that he was converted..... to steel .... He has said he will never go back ...... True, we are not competitors , but we do ride long miles.
    More riders of the non-competitive type need to convert to the laid back geometry of retro bikes.....
    And the welds of the masters and the lug work can be truely called art.....
    Another friend has a carbon bike ...... Squeak, squeak , squeak .....
    Plus....... Replacing dented tubes .....
     
  13. desertrat30

    desertrat30 New Member

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    Would I spend a lot of money on an old frame? No, but I do spend very little money on my 33 year old R-531 bike that I ride everyday. Being an old French bike some parts are hard to find but they are out there. My bike is very up to date with modern components. The extra weight is worth it in the comfort and longivity of the bike. At the end of a long ride I am beat, but not beat up. I found many new cromo frames now being made today. What about those?
     
  14. JSWin

    JSWin Member

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    They just want that brand I guess. Styles and colors change. Probably that particular one cost a great deal more. Some people are like that.
     
  15. moneyman

    moneyman Member

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    I have also wondered how anyone would pay thousands of bucks for a decades old bike but some bikes are really rare and if they are kept in good condition they could be worth a grand easily.
     
  16. Djordje87

    Djordje87 Member

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    There are people, me included, who like oldies. Whether we are talking about bikes or cars or even guitars. New is not always better. So you buy a 30 year old bicycle that works as if it is new, you pay 800 bucks, a bit too much i agree. I wander if someone can tell in what shape will they expect their new bike to be in 30 years? I don't imply that it wouldn't be good because i am not a professional in this area, i just ask all of you what do you think. My opinion is that nothing is made to last these days. Simple reason for this is that companies want to sell more. If you do not have need to buy a new product then these companies will have problems.
     
  17. Muhammad adnan

    Muhammad adnan New Member

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    One of the commonest questions people ask when considering to sell, or buy, an old bicycle is what it it worth? In dollars and cents, many people just want to know how much they can get for their old bike, or how much they should pay when purchasing an old bicycle. How much should I pay, or how much should I sell it for? Incredibly common questions in the vintage bicycle world. And, for what this is worth, I have no idea what vintage bicycles are worth. Read on and understand why...

    The long and short of it, after being involved in hundreds of vintage bicycle transactions, is that there is absolutely no way to guess at a vintage bicycle's value. A host of things impact value, and many of them have nothing, what so ever, to do with the bicycle.

    Make, size, model, condition, location, historical significance, color, style, and who knows what else, will play a part in determining a bike's selling or purchasing value. And, there seems to be little way to predict how each, and all, will impact a bike's selling value.Consider these three Torpado bicycles, all are Luxe models and all are of the same approximate vintage. All three are in very good to excellent condition. And all three sold within a year of each other. One sold for $180.00, one for $700 and one for over $1200. How could anyone manage to offer value predictions, based on those results?

    With this in mind and knowing that the interest, in bicycle riding is increasing, particularly in North America, expect bicycle values to increase. Additionally, and of equal importance, the interest in the vintage bicycle, be it a road bike, roadster or even early mountain bike, is growing at an even faster rate.

    This suggests that demand will be increasing, while supply, at best, will remain constant. Increased demand, coupled with fixed supply, equals rising prices, both for the seller and the buyer. It is simple math.

    However, all of the above, is of little, or no help, what so ever, to the person trying to figure out how much to ask, or how much to give, when the price of a vintage bicycle is the topic of interest. With this in mind, it might be a good idea to understand how to determine a bicycle's inherent value, rather than its monetary worth. Inherent value?
    What is inherent value? It is the value defined by the quality level of the bicycle itself. In other words, learn how to determine a top of the line, race worthy steed from the one intended for the beginning recreational rider. Needless to say, the top dog will almost always be worth more dollars and cents that the bottom of the line, mass produced offering.

    Begin evaluating value, by understand the basic, or fundamental, characteristics of vintage bicycles. Two of the most important characteristics are make, accentuated by vintage.
     
  18. rEEzytheKiD

    rEEzytheKiD New Member

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    I would totally shell out some bucks on an old bike, but only if the previous owner had invested in it and kept it up to the standards of the times. It wouldn't make any sense to buy an old bike for a lot of money just to have it break down and then find out they don't make replacement parts anymore.
     
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