High-Protein Diet

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Phil M., Mar 7, 2004.

  1. Phil M.

    Phil M. Guest

    During the day, usually in the afternoon, I get a funny
    taste in my mouth. It's almost a metallic taste. Also, I am
    more thirsty than usual. I already drink a good bit of
    water, averaging about 100 ounces per day for the past 3
    months. I read the quote below that makes me wonder if I'm
    taking in too much protein.

    "Eating a high-protein diet can cause dehydration if you
    don't drink a lot of water. Your body can use only so much
    protein each day. Any surplus must be converted into urea
    and excreted in the urine. The conversion requires a
    surprising amount of water--seven times what you'd need to
    metabolize the same number of calories in carbohydrates.
    That's why high-protein diets always call for extra fluids.
    It also explains why athletes on high-protein regimens are
    especially prone to water loss:

    they not only sweat a lot, but also give up water for
    protein extraction.

    Weight: 167 Protein: averaging 123 g/day (for the past 3
    months) Water: averaging 97 oz/day (for the past 3 months)
    Running: about 40 MPW

    Any thoughts on this?

    Phil

    --
    If you can empty your own boat Crossing the river of the
    world, No one will oppose you, No one will seek to harm you.
    -Chuang Tzu
     
    Tags:


  2. Mark Mauro

    Mark Mauro Guest

    "Phil M." <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > During the day, usually in the afternoon, I get a funny
    > taste in my mouth. It's almost a metallic taste. Also, I
    > am more thirsty than usual. I already drink a good bit of
    > water, averaging about 100 ounces per day for the past 3
    > months. I read the quote below that makes me wonder if I'm
    > taking in too much protein.
    >
    > "Eating a high-protein diet can cause dehydration if you
    > don't drink a lot of water. Your body can use only so much
    > protein each day. Any surplus must be converted into urea
    > and excreted in the urine. The conversion requires a
    > surprising amount of water--seven times what you'd need to
    > metabolize the same number of calories in carbohydrates.
    > That's why high-protein diets always call for extra
    > fluids. It also explains why athletes on high-protein
    > regimens are especially prone to water loss:
    >
    > they not only sweat a lot, but also give up water for
    > protein extraction.
    >
    > Weight: 167 Protein: averaging 123 g/day (for the past 3
    > months) Water: averaging 97 oz/day (for the past 3 months)
    > Running: about 40 MPW
    >
    > Any thoughts on this?
    >
    > Phil
    I'm by no means an expert but I had the same problem on my
    brief (2 week) high protein diet. I was eating about 130
    g/day of protein, and I couldn't get enough water. Sometimes
    I would go through 3 20 oz. bottles of water in a half an
    hour. The weight loss was great. I lost like 6 pounds during
    the diet but felt like crap in the process. My situation was
    a little different than yours because I wasn't getting
    enough carbs either (also about 130 g/day), but I don't
    think the high protein helped matters. Once I got off the
    high protein diet I gained the 6 pounds back but I have a
    lot more energy and my training times have improved. What
    ratio of carbs/protein/fat are doing? I think I'm doing
    about 60/20/20.

    Mark Mauro
     
  3. Phil M.

    Phil M. Guest

    [email protected] (Mark Mauro) wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > "Phil M." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    >> During the day, usually in the afternoon, I get a funny
    >> taste in my mouth. It's almost a metallic taste. Also, I
    >> am more thirsty than usual. I already drink a good bit of
    >> water, averaging about 100 ounces per day for the past 3
    >> months. I read the quote below that makes me wonder if
    >> I'm taking in too much protein.
    >>
    >> "Eating a high-protein diet can cause dehydration if you
    >> don't drink a lot of water. Your body can use only so
    >> much protein each day. Any surplus must be converted into
    >> urea and excreted in the urine. The conversion requires a
    >> surprising amount of water--seven times what you'd need
    >> to metabolize the same number of calories in
    >> carbohydrates. That's why high-protein diets always call
    >> for extra fluids. It also explains why athletes on high-
    >> protein regimens are especially prone to water loss:
    >>
    >> they not only sweat a lot, but also give up water for
    >> protein extraction.
    >>
    >> Weight: 167 Protein: averaging 123 g/day (for the past 3
    >> months) Water: averaging 97 oz/day (for the past 3
    >> months) Running: about 40 MPW
    >>
    >> Any thoughts on this?
    >>
    >> Phil
    > I'm by no means an expert but I had the same problem on my
    > brief (2 week) high protein diet. I was eating about 130
    > g/day of protein, and I couldn't get enough water.
    > Sometimes I would go through 3 20 oz. bottles of water in
    > a half an hour. The weight loss was great. I lost like 6
    > pounds during the diet but felt like crap in the process.
    > My situation was a little different than yours because I
    > wasn't getting enough carbs either (also about 130 g/day),
    > but I don't think the high protein helped matters. Once I
    > got off the high protein diet I gained the 6 pounds back
    > but I have a lot more energy and my training times have
    > improved. What ratio of carbs/protein/fat are doing? I
    > think I'm doing about 60/20/20.

    Actually, I feel very good. My running is strong. It's
    just the funny taste and the thirst that makes me wonder
    what's going on.

    This is my daily average for the past month: Carbohydrates -
    353 grams 60% Protein - 150 grams, 25% Fat - 41 18 grams 15%

    I've been using my weight as a guideline for protein intake.
    1.2 to 1.8 grams/kg body weight/day, which at my present
    weight would be 91 to 136 grams per day. So I'm averaging
    slightly over the recommended high.

    Phil
    --
    If you can empty your own boat Crossing the river of the
    world, No one will oppose you, No one will seek to harm you.
    -Chuang Tzu
     
  4. Sam

    Sam Guest

    "Phil M." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > During the day, usually in the afternoon, I get a funny
    > taste in my mouth. It's almost a metallic taste. Also, I
    > am more thirsty than usual. I already drink a good bit of
    > water, averaging about 100 ounces per day for the past 3
    > months. I read the quote below that makes me wonder if I'm
    > taking in too much protein.
    >
    > "Eating a high-protein diet can cause dehydration if you
    > don't drink a lot of water. Your body can use only so much
    > protein each day. Any surplus must be converted into urea
    > and excreted in the urine. The conversion requires a
    > surprising amount of water--seven times what you'd need to
    > metabolize the same number of calories in carbohydrates.
    > That's why high-protein diets always call for extra
    > fluids. It also explains why athletes on high-protein
    > regimens are especially prone to water loss:
    >
    > they not only sweat a lot, but also give up water for
    > protein extraction.
    >
    > Weight: 167 Protein: averaging 123 g/day (for the past 3
    > months) Water: averaging 97 oz/day (for the past 3 months)
    > Running: about 40 MPW
    >
    > Any thoughts on this?

    1) I would not say that for your body mass that 123
    g/d is all that high. Consider that you weigh ~76kg
    and a common protein intake that is recommended is
    1.5 g/kg, that gives you 113 g. 10 more grams is
    not all that much. I would not consider 123 g to be
    high for you.
    2) I am not sure the metallic taste is necessarily
    related to protein.

    >
    > Phil
    >
    > --
    > If you can empty your own boat Crossing the river of the
    > world, No one will oppose you, No one will seek to harm
    > you. -Chuang Tzu
     
  5. Sam

    Sam Guest

    "Phil M." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > During the day, usually in the afternoon, I get a funny
    > taste in my mouth. It's almost a metallic taste. Also, I
    > am more thirsty than usual. I already drink a good bit of
    > water, averaging about 100 ounces per day for the past 3
    > months. I read the quote below that makes me wonder if I'm
    > taking in too much protein.
    >
    > "Eating a high-protein diet can cause dehydration if you
    > don't drink a lot of water. Your body can use only so much
    > protein each day. Any surplus must be converted into urea
    > and excreted in the urine. The conversion requires a
    > surprising amount of water--seven times what you'd need to
    > metabolize the same number of calories in carbohydrates.
    > That's why high-protein diets always call for extra
    > fluids. It also explains why athletes on high-protein
    > regimens are especially prone to water loss:
    >
    > they not only sweat a lot, but also give up water for
    > protein extraction.
    >
    > Weight: 167 Protein: averaging 123 g/day (for the past 3
    > months) Water: averaging 97 oz/day (for the past 3 months)
    > Running: about 40 MPW
    >
    > Any thoughts on this?

    1) I would not say that for your body mass that 123
    g/d is all that high. Consider that you weigh ~76kg
    and a common protein intake that is recommended is
    1.5 g/kg, that gives you 113 g. 10 more grams is
    not all that much. I would not consider 123 g to be
    high for you.
    2) I am not sure the metallic taste is necessarily
    related to protein.

    >
    > Phil
    >
    > --
    > If you can empty your own boat Crossing the river of the
    > world, No one will oppose you, No one will seek to harm
    > you. -Chuang Tzu
     
  6. Rick++

    Rick++ Guest

    Since at least half of your protein is surplus and being
    excreted, and protein is expensive, that gives new meaning
    to the "golden shower". Protein deficiency is another of
    those diet myths.
     
  7. Phil M.

    Phil M. Guest

    [email protected] (rick++) wrote in news:f7422d8e.0403080733.3120272
    @posting.google.com:

    > Since at least half of your protein is surplus and being
    > excreted, and protein is expensive, that gives new meaning
    > to the "golden shower". Protein deficiency is another of
    > those diet myths.
    >

    It's about 62 cents per day. I'm getting my extra protein
    from a whey powder supplement. It's $22 for a 5 pound tub. A
    32 gram scoop of whey powder contains 22 grams of protein.
    If I'm doing the math correctly, 5 lbs
    = 2,268 grams. So the 5 pound tub contains 71 servings. If I
    = have 2 scoops
    a day. It comes out to about 62 cents per day for 44 grams
    of protein.

    -Phil
     
  8. "Phil M." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > [email protected] (rick++) wrote in
    > news:f7422d8e.0403080733.3120272 @posting.google.com:
    >
    > > Since at least half of your protein is surplus and being
    > > excreted, and protein is expensive, that gives new
    > > meaning to the "golden shower". Protein deficiency is
    > > another of those diet myths.
    > >
    >
    > It's about 62 cents per day. I'm getting my extra protein
    > from a whey powder supplement. It's $22 for a 5 pound tub.
    > A 32 gram scoop of whey powder contains 22 grams of
    > protein. If I'm doing the math correctly, 5
    lbs
    > = 2,268 grams. So the 5 pound tub contains 71 servings. If
    > = I have 2 scoops
    > a day. It comes out to about 62 cents per day for 44 grams
    > of protein.

    And if you are ingesting it at about 25 to 30 grams per 3
    hour interval, very little of your protein will be
    surplus...unless your entire caloric intake is at a credit.
    I think you were talking 165 grams of protein or about 660
    calories, which is quite easy for the body to metabolize
    even without intensive workouts.
     
  9. Phil M.

    Phil M. Guest

    [email protected] (rick++) wrote in news:f7422d8e.0403080733.3120272
    @posting.google.com:

    > Since at least half of your protein is surplus and being
    > excreted, and protein is expensive, that gives new meaning
    > to the "golden shower". Protein deficiency is another of
    > those diet myths.

    What's the myth? I'm not taking the extra protein to stave
    of a deficiency, but to enhance my running/health program.

    Phil

    --
    If you can empty your own boat Crossing the river of the
    world, No one will oppose you, No one will seek to harm you.
    -Chuang Tzu
     
  10. In article <[email protected]>, Mark Mauro wrote:
    > "Phil M." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...

    > I'm by no means an expert but I had the same problem on my
    > brief (2 week) high protein diet. I was eating about 130
    > g/day of protein, and I couldn't get enough water.
    > Sometimes I would go through 3 20 oz. bottles of water in
    > a half an hour. The weight loss was great. I lost like 6
    > pounds during the diet but felt like crap in the process.
    > My situation was a little different than yours because I
    > wasn't getting enough carbs either (also about 130 g/day),
    > but I don't think the high protein helped matters.

    I think that has much more to do with low carb than it does
    high protein.

    It's difficult to train on 130gm carb per day, and once your
    carb intake drops that low, you're going to need to allocate
    some of your carbs specifically for training (that is, about
    half of that 130gm carbs had better be consumed just before
    your workouts)

    > Once I got off the high protein diet I gained

    130gm/day is NOT a "high protein diet" unless you weigh 90lb
    or something.

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  11. In article <[email protected]>, Phil M. wrote:
    > [email protected] (Mark Mauro) wrote in
    > news:[email protected]:

    > Actually, I feel very good. My running is strong. It's
    > just the funny taste and the thirst that makes me wonder
    > what's going on.

    There are many things that cause this. I haven't heard of
    high protein causing this, I have heard of people with
    ketosis experiencing similar, but I just don't see how
    that's possible given your carb intake.

    Your protein intake is not at all excessive, and even
    if we take that 70% number at face value, that water
    you're drinking should cover the excess just fine. I'd
    stick with it.

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  12. Phil M.

    Phil M. Guest

    Donovan Rebbechi <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Phil M. wrote:
    >> [email protected] (Mark Mauro) wrote in
    >> news:[email protected]:
    >
    >> Actually, I feel very good. My running is strong. It's
    >> just the funny taste and the thirst that makes me wonder
    >> what's going on.
    >
    > There are many things that cause this. I haven't heard of
    > high protein causing this, I have heard of people with
    > ketosis experiencing similar, but I just don't see how
    > that's possible given your carb intake.
    >
    > Your protein intake is not at all excessive, and even if
    > we take that 70% number at face value, that water you're
    > drinking should cover the excess just fine. I'd stick
    > with it.

    Yes, I plan on it. My wife seems to think it could be early
    signs of diabetes. Not because of my health now, but because
    of how I used to be (245, no exercise).

    -Phil
     
  13. David

    David Guest

    However, distance runners DO need more protein than the
    'average joe'.

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (rick++) wrote:

    > Since at least half of your protein is surplus and being
    > excreted, and protein is expensive, that gives new meaning
    > to the "golden shower". Protein deficiency is another of
    > those diet myths

    --
    Nova Scotia, Canada
     
  14. Doug Freese

    Doug Freese Guest

    David wrote:

    > However, distance runners DO need more protein than the
    > 'average joe'.

    True and as you said in a different post, eat a balanced
    diet and don't worry about it. I've been doing long stuff
    for 15 years and never give my food much thought. I eat
    meat and fish and love my beans and rice (complex carbs)
    and simply worry about training with food coming along free
    for the ride.

    All this diet shit does is cloud the nutrition issue to make
    a few bucks. I will admit, if I had a few less brews and
    skipped the simple carb desserts I might drop a few pounds
    but that would make me annoyingly perfect.

    --
    Doug Freese "Caveat Lector" [email protected]
     
  15. Phil M.

    Phil M. Guest

    Doug Freese <[email protected]> wrote in news:3Li3c.32877$Wo2.20896
    @twister.nyc.rr.com:

    > that would make me annoyingly perfect.

    Instead of perfectly annoying? ;-)

    Phil

    --
    "A man should never be ashamed to own that he has been in the wrong, which
    is but saying in other words that he is wiser today than he was
    yesterday." -Alexander Pope
     
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