High Quality Spoke Protector?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Jeff Starr, May 14, 2004.

  1. Jeff Starr

    Jeff Starr Guest

    Hi, First off, I have searched the archives and have read the reasons
    for not needing a protector. A properly adjusted RD precludes the
    need. There lies the potential for disaster. It is the first
    derailleur I have ever installed, adjusted, and maintain on my own. It
    works fine now, but I am not ready to trust my skills with my new
    wheels.

    Ok, what I would like is a lightweight, high quality spoke
    protector[SP]. The spokes will be black, so the SP could be clear or
    possibly black. The largest cog is 25t and the hub is a 32 hole
    Dura-Ace.

    Are they reusable, the one that is on my Aurora Matrix wheels is 5.5",
    clear, and not overly obtrusive. If I can't find a new one locally, I
    might reuse it, if possible. I have seen them online for as little as
    $3, but the shipping is often double the cost. Has anyone made their
    own? A custom SP?

    As I already mentioned, I'm past the debate on whether to use one. It
    is just a question of which one. Did any high end, aftermarket wheels
    come with SPs? If so, does anyone have the SP, just sitting there,
    never to be used, maybe looking for a new home? I'd happily pay for
    shipping and maybe more;-)
    Any info, help, and/or suggestions will be appreciated.
    Thank you,
    Jeff
    And yes -
    Life is Good!
     
    Tags:


  2. daveornee

    daveornee Guest

    Jeff Starr wrote:
    > Hi, First off, I have searched the archives and have read the reasons
    > for not needing a protector. A properly adjusted RD precludes the need.
    > There lies the potential for disaster. It is the first derailleur I have
    > ever installed, adjusted, and maintain on my own. It works fine now, but
    > I am not ready to trust my skills with my new wheels.
    > Ok, what I would like is a lightweight, high quality spoke
    > protector[SP]. The spokes will be black, so the SP could be clear
    > or possibly black. The largest cog is 25t and the hub is a 32
    > hole Dura-Ace.
    > Are they reusable, the one that is on my Aurora Matrix wheels is 5.5",
    > clear, and not overly obtrusive. If I can't find a new one locally, I
    > might reuse it, if possible. I have seen them online for as little as
    > $3, but the shipping is often double the cost. Has anyone made their
    > own? A custom SP?
    > As I already mentioned, I'm past the debate on whether to use one. It is
    > just a question of which one. Did any high end, aftermarket wheels come
    > with SPs? If so, does anyone have the SP, just sitting there, never to
    > be used, maybe looking for a new home? I'd happily pay for shipping and
    > maybe more;-) Any info, help, and/or suggestions will be appreciated.
    > Thank you, Jeff And yes - Life is Good!




    Clean up the one from your other wheel and use it. Spoke Protectors are
    easy to swap. One thing.. both wheels need to have the same number of
    spokes. Some local bike shops carry them as well.



    --
     
  3. On 14 May 2004 09:43:34 -0700, [email protected] (Jeff Starr) wrote:

    >Hi, First off, I have searched the archives and have read the reasons
    >for not needing a protector. A properly adjusted RD precludes the
    >need. There lies the potential for disaster. It is the first
    >derailleur I have ever installed, adjusted, and maintain on my own. It
    >works fine now, but I am not ready to trust my skills with my new
    >wheels.
    >
    >Ok, what I would like is a lightweight, high quality spoke
    >protector[SP]. The spokes will be black, so the SP could be clear or
    >possibly black. The largest cog is 25t and the hub is a 32 hole
    >Dura-Ace.
    >
    >Are they reusable, the one that is on my Aurora Matrix wheels is 5.5",
    >clear, and not overly obtrusive. If I can't find a new one locally, I
    >might reuse it, if possible. I have seen them online for as little as
    >$3, but the shipping is often double the cost. Has anyone made their
    >own? A custom SP?
    >
    >As I already mentioned, I'm past the debate on whether to use one. It
    >is just a question of which one. Did any high end, aftermarket wheels
    >come with SPs? If so, does anyone have the SP, just sitting there,
    >never to be used, maybe looking for a new home? I'd happily pay for
    >shipping and maybe more;-)
    >Any info, help, and/or suggestions will be appreciated.
    >Thank you,
    >Jeff
    >And yes -
    >Life is Good!


    Dear Jeff,

    Plastic spoke protectors are re-usable in that you can often fiddle
    them off and back on again.

    But after a few times, their retaining prongs tend to stay bent or
    even break off when re-used. The prongs also age and becomes brittle
    and die natural deaths.

    One way to remove them is to bend the outer edge of the plastic circle
    out away from the spokes slightly with a thumb pushing the other way
    right over the prong. The idea is to bow the plastic prong slightly.
    away from the hub enough to slip its tiny hooked end over the flange
    of the hub.

    Three prongs are typical for 36-spoke freehubs, and four prongs for
    32-spoke freehubs.

    There are also freewheel spoke protectors, which have no prongs and
    spin freely. They can be obtained for about $60 by purchasing a Fury
    RoadMaster at WalMart, or from these guys for $2 to $3:

    http://www.biketoolsetc.com

    They also sell the 3 and 4 prong stuff, with details about cluster
    size, brand, and number of spokes.

    As for the shipping cost of little parts . . .

    If you buy a lot of different little parts, Christmas comes early. The
    same sites probably sell chains, tools, tubes, tires, handlebar tape,
    spokes, cables, gloves, books, and gizmos.

    If you buy a couple of spares, you can go riding on Christmas when
    something breaks and the stores are shut. Having a spare sprocket
    cover will let you congratulate yourself on your foresight when the
    first one breaks one of its little retaining prongs.

    The real cost of a ten-cent bolt is not the dime at the cash register,
    but the time that you spent going to the store, finding the right
    bolt, paying for it, and going home--buy ten bolts for a buck and you
    may save yourself an hour or two.

    Carl Fogel
     
  4. Jeff Starr

    Jeff Starr Guest

    daveornee <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<cu7pc.2$4%[email protected]>...
    >
    >
    > Clean up the one from your other wheel and use it. Spoke Protectors are
    > easy to swap. One thing.. both wheels need to have the same number of
    > spokes. Some local bike shops carry them as well.
    >

    Hi,I went to my LBS today, I was able to get the Conti Race Light
    tubes that I needed and a couple of spoke protectors. They gave me a
    used one in the size I need, that cleaned up like new. And I bought a
    21-24t to see if I can get away with it. My cassette has a 25t large
    cog, but I noticed that a lot of the bikes in the showroom had
    protectors that weren't much larger than the large cog. I assume that
    it just needs to be big enough to act as a guide. If that is the case,
    it should work.

    Life is Good!
    Jeff
     
  5. wle

    wle Guest

    [email protected] (Jeff Starr) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Hi, First off, I have searched the archives and have read the reasons
    > for not needing a protector. A properly adjusted RD precludes the
    > need. There lies the potential for disaster. It is the first
    > derailleur I have ever installed, adjusted, and maintain on my own


    the problem is, if you REALLY screw up the adjustment
    [or if the derailleur hanger gets bent, even after a
    proper adjustment], is that it won;t just be the chain that
    gets into the spokes - it will be the outer jockey wheel, too.

    to protect against that, the protector needs to be about a foot
    in diameter!

    needless to say no one has spoke protectors that big!

    the point being, adjust it right, and don;t get the hanger bent.

    wle.
     
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