Highway riding experiences?



E

Evsolutions

Guest
I have not been on a Highway (on a bicycle) for almost 30 years and although I did cycle city to
city in the early 70's, it was on a 10 speed and I spent a lot of time going into a ditch or riding
on soft shoulders to avoid the 18 wheel tractor trailers. My planned ride this summer is going to
place me on the Trans-Canada Highway for several thousand miles and since I began riding recumbents
in 1978 I developed this fear of ditches re: I refuse to ride on the shoulder of a road or in the
curb lane. I am wondering how sane it will be to ride a Highway (in traffic), meaning travel in the
same lane as the cars and tractor trailers and expect them to go around me as opposed to going over
me? I will be using a tadpole with a 6 foot long trailer (not something I would want to be driving
into a ditch). A tadpole will slide into a ditch on loose gravel...found on the shoulders of
roads...so I'd have to stay on the pavement. I will pedal the entire time...for the cardio-vascular
benefit and to stop leg cramps...plus weight loss (have not seen my knees while standing in years).
I will in all likelihood use a pedal-assist e-motor with 9 heavy batteries in the trailer for
hills/mountains/headwinds...again not something I want sliding into a ditch.

So the question is: in your bent cycling experience on the highways, will cars & trucks respect your
right to be on the pavement and pass you or do they force you to the left and into the ditch? I know
that everyone will have different experiences with this, different highway networks, different
temperment of auto users etc., I just need some reassurance that I will make it to the Pacific
without getting their being dragged under the rear wheels of a truck.

So far I have Bear attacks, Attack Dogs, Mountain Lion attacks, Rednecks in pickup trucks and
Lightning covered...1st 4 = ride with a Flare Gun, a slab of raw meat and a "I Luv the KKK"
bumper sticker.

Joshua
*****
 
D

David Williams

Guest
Gee, good luck! I applaud what you're doing!

I offer some opinions, based on my experiences...

1) on the average, big rig drivers are better drivers than others, but many are fatigued, which can
spell disaster.

2) the "rednecks in pickups," while still problematic, may have to wait in line behind SUV drivers
with phones glued to their faces. Seriously, people talking on phones drift all over the place
and often don't even realize it afterwards (oh, you mean others have noticed this, too?).

3) in spite of "common wisdom," 'bents attract attention, and drivers looking at you are less likely
to squash you, regardless of how annoyed they get of your existence. The trick is to make
yourself look as weird as possible. You might get hit by rotten tomatoes, but that beats being
dragged under a Ford Excrement.

4) Can you use a tandem, with the bear as stoker?

"EVSolutions" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> I have not been on a Highway (on a bicycle) for almost 30 years and
although
> I did cycle city to city in the early 70's, it was on a 10 speed and I
spent
> a lot of time going into a ditch or riding on soft shoulders to avoid the
18
> wheel tractor trailers. My planned ride this summer is going to place me
on
> the Trans-Canada Highway for several thousand miles and since I began
riding
> recumbents in 1978 I developed this fear of ditches re: I refuse to ride
on
> the shoulder of a road or in the curb lane. I am wondering how sane it will be to ride a Highway
> (in traffic), meaning travel in the same lane as the cars and tractor trailers and expect them
to
> go around me as opposed to going over me? I will be using a tadpole with a 6 foot long trailer
> (not something I
would
> want to be driving into a ditch). A tadpole will slide into a ditch on
loose
> gravel...found on the shoulders of roads...so I'd have to stay on the pavement. I will pedal the
> entire time...for the cardio-vascular benefit and to stop leg cramps...plus weight loss (have not
> seen my knees while standing in years). I will in all likelihood use a pedal-assist e-motor with 9
> heavy batteries in the trailer for hills/mountains/headwinds...again not something I want sliding
> into a ditch.
>
> So the question is: in your bent cycling experience on the highways, will cars & trucks respect
> your right to be on the pavement and pass you or do they force you to the left and into the ditch?
> I know that everyone will have different experiences with this, different highway networks,
different
> temperment of auto users etc., I just need some reassurance that I will
make
> it to the Pacific without getting their being dragged under the rear
wheels
> of a truck.
>
> So far I have Bear attacks, Attack Dogs, Mountain Lion attacks, Rednecks
in
> pickup trucks and Lightning covered...1st 4 = ride with a Flare Gun, a
slab
> of raw meat and a "I Luv the KKK" bumper sticker.
>
> Joshua
> *****
 

bikebob

New Member
Dec 3, 2003
15
0
0
Originally posted by Evsolutions
I have not been on a Highway (on a bicycle) for almost 30 years and although I did cycle city to
city in the early 70's, it was on a 10 speed and I spent a lot of time going into a ditch or riding
on soft shoulders to avoid the 18 wheel tractor trailers. My planned ride this summer is going to
place me on the Trans-Canada Highway for several thousand miles and since I began riding recumbents
in 1978 I developed this fear of ditches re: I refuse to ride on the shoulder of a road or in the
curb lane. I am wondering how sane it will be to ride a Highway (in traffic), meaning travel in the
same lane as the cars and tractor trailers and expect them to go around me as opposed to going over
me? I will be using a tadpole with a 6 foot long trailer (not something I would want to be driving
into a ditch). A tadpole will slide into a ditch on loose gravel...found on the shoulders of
roads...so I'd have to stay on the pavement. I will pedal the entire time...for the cardio-vascular
benefit and to stop leg cramps...plus weight loss (have not seen my knees while standing in years).
I will in all likelihood use a pedal-assist e-motor with 9 heavy batteries in the trailer for
hills/mountains/headwinds...again not something I want sliding into a ditch.

So the question is: in your bent cycling experience on the highways, will cars & trucks respect your
right to be on the pavement and pass you or do they force you to the left and into the ditch? I know
that everyone will have different experiences with this, different highway networks, different
temperment of auto users etc., I just need some reassurance that I will make it to the Pacific
without getting their being dragged under the rear wheels of a truck.

So far I have Bear attacks, Attack Dogs, Mountain Lion attacks, Rednecks in pickup trucks and
Lightning covered...1st 4 = ride with a Flare Gun, a slab of raw meat and a "I Luv the KKK"
bumper sticker.

Joshua
*****
Hi Joshua,
I can't speak as to the road manners of motor vehicles on the Trans Canada hwy. I was pleasantly surprised, however, by my experience on the Trans America trail this past summer. In 1800 miles across Oregon, Idaho, Montana, Wyoming and part of Colorado the only "bad" experience was the traffic headed back to the Metropolitan Denver area after the weekend. Even that was nothing compared to my regular commute here in northern California.
It seems in the more rural areas, at least out west, the drivers are more conscientious about giving you plenty of room as they pass. Even where there was no paved shoulder available, I was rarely given less than 1/2 a lane's space as they passed. Even when I wasn't paying the strictest attention to the rear (it happens on those long empty stretches) and didn't move over in time, there was no blasting horn, no cursing, they just went by. This by the way included log truck, long haulers, heavy equipment trailers, highway line painters and most rv's.
As I write this the whole thing seems unreal and highly unlikely, but that was my experience.
Your results may vary.
BTW, if your not already using a rearview mirror,get one and use it.
Bob
 
E

Edward Dolan

Guest
"EVSolutions" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:<[email protected]lobal.com>... [...]

Hi Joshua,

Regarding you trans-Canada trip to the Pacific Coast on your tadpole trike
pulling a trailer, my best advice is to find the back roads and ride on them as
much as you can even if it adds many hundreds of extra miles. A major highway
will work with a trike provided it has broad paved shoulders. If it doesn't, you
will be in trouble and it will not be a pleasant trip.

Another thing to watch out for are rumble strips which are now found along the
shoulders of many highways. These will be a nightmare for a trike as you can not
get over on the shoulder because of them. I once did a bike tour in Wyoming with
a guy who had a tadpole trike and he simply could not get over on the paved
shoulders because of the rumble strips. All oncoming traffic had to go around
him. I always want to be able to get over on the shoulder if and when I need to
be there because of traffic situations.

A final word to the wise: do not play Russian roulette out on the highway
with drivers of motor vehicles. Find those back roads and stay on them the
best you can.

Regards,

Ed Dolan - Minnesota
 
L

Lioninoil At Ne

Guest
> since I began riding recumbents in 1978 I developed this fear of ditches
> re: I refuse to ride on the shoulder of a road or in the curb lane.

That seems an odd fear, and an even more odd reaction to it, one that could
possibly prove fatal on a highway. How did this fear develop?

I once rode my Tour_Easy into a ditch at speed while on my way to an Air Show,
because I heard the distinctive sound of an O-2 Skymaster overhead, and looked up
to see it fly past. I usually have very good directional control of the bike,
even while looking about, but on that particular morning, my faculties failed me.
Luckily, the only damage was to my pride.

> I am wondering how sane it will be to ride a Highway (in traffic), meaning
> travel in the same lane as the cars and tractor trailers and expect them to go
> around me as opposed to going over me?

Don't do it, Joshua. Most car-drivers and almost all truck-drivers will give you
your space, but only one bad actor can really ruin your day.
 
E

Evsolutions

Guest
Good Advice...Thanx I had originally planned on using the
"Trans-Canada Trail", which is a series of Rail Trails and
community bike paths that (were supposed to be
connected)..seems that connecting never happened. The morons
who designed the bike trails wanted them for people with
Mountain bikes with lots of suspension travel, my tadpole
will break an axle on some of these trails. One trail I
looked at has loose gravel and sand and on either side a big
drop into a creek (boy that will fun sliding sideways and
falling into a creek). Some trails are designed so badly
even horses would have a problem.

I do plan on using rural roads and secondary highways...last
thing I want to do is avoid every village and town by using
a major highway. Part of the plan is to not plan the trip
around how many MacDonald's Restaurants I can hit in 8,000
miles. When and IF I make it to Vancouver, the 2nd leg is to
go down into Washington and over to Oregon. I have lead a
very sheltered life so far. Have never been west of Detroit,
did get to spend 3 months in Kentucky (but flew there),
spent 18 hours in Germany (8 of those hours discovering
German beer and then barfing on an MP) and then got to see
China Beach and that was it. Figure it is time to see the
countryside for a few months, commune with nature and hope I
don't end up riding off the beaten path into a scene from
Deliverence...although I am a might partial to cussin,
spitting, belchin and banjo and fiddle music.

"Edward Dolan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> "EVSolutions" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:<[email protected]>...
> [...]
>
> Hi Joshua,
>
> Regarding you trans-Canada trip to the Pacific Coast on
> your tadpole trike pulling a trailer, my best advice is to
> find the back roads and ride on them as much as you can
> even if it adds many hundreds of extra miles. A major
> highway will work with a trike provided it has broad paved
> shoulders. If it doesn't, you will be in trouble and it
> will not be a pleasant trip.
>
> Another thing to watch out for are rumble strips which are
> now found along the shoulders of many highways. These will
> be a nightmare for a trike as you can not get over on the
> shoulder because of them. I once did a bike tour in
> Wyoming with a guy who had a tadpole trike and he simply
> could not get over on the paved shoulders because of the
> rumble strips. All oncoming traffic had to go around him.
> I always want to be able to get over on the shoulder if
> and when I need to be there because of traffic situations.
>
> A final word to the wise: do not play Russian roulette out
> on the highway with drivers of motor vehicles. Find those
> back roads and stay on them the best you can.
>
> Regards,
>
> Ed Dolan - Minnesota
 
M

Mike Vermeulen

Guest
>I have not been on a Highway (on a bicycle) for almost 30
>years and although I did cycle city to city in the early
>70's, it was on a 10 speed and I spent a lot of time going
>into a ditch or riding on soft shoulders to avoid the 18
>wheel tractor trailers. My planned ride this summer is
>going to place me on the Trans-Canada Highway for several
>thousand miles and since I began riding recumbents in 1978
>I developed this fear of ditches re: I refuse to ride on
>the shoulder of a road or in the curb lane.

I think the experience will vary widely with the amount of
shoulder on said highway. I bicycled across Canada in 1997
(starting with Alaska Highway and stretches of Yellowhead
Highway, so further north than you). At that time, I had
narrow shoulders for a bit along St Lawrence in Quebec and
in southern Ontario. I also avoided the direct Thunder Bay
to Kenora route due to rumors of narrow shoulders.
Otherwise, Manitoba tended not to have much in way of
shoulders but Alberta and BC more...

In any case, while there are a few spots where Trans-Canada
may be only choice, for most part you should be able to
find alternatives that will be a little more pleasant and
less traffic.

In any case, I was riding a diamond frame bike then and
decided to veer off in the ditch less than 5 times in
9800km riding across Canada. I got a recumbent last year
and haven't noticed large differences in how I'm treated by
highway drivers on either recumbent or diamond frame
bicycles. What I do notice is that a rear view mirror is
more important since it is tougher to turn my head and
check traffic.

--mev, Mike Vermeulen
 

Dan Burkhart

New Member
Nov 27, 2003
333
0
0
69
Originally posted by Evsolutions
I have not been on a Highway (on a bicycle) for almost 30 years and although I did cycle city to
city in the early 70's, it was on a 10 speed and I spent a lot of time going into a ditch or riding
on soft shoulders to avoid the 18 wheel tractor trailers. My planned ride this summer is going to
place me on the Trans-Canada Highway for several thousand miles and since I began riding recumbents
in 1978 I developed this fear of ditches re: I refuse to ride on the shoulder of a road or in the
curb lane. I am wondering how sane it will be to ride a Highway (in traffic), meaning travel in the
same lane as the cars and tractor trailers and expect them to go around me as opposed to going over
me? I will be using a tadpole with a 6 foot long trailer (not something I would want to be driving
into a ditch). A tadpole will slide into a ditch on loose gravel...found on the shoulders of
roads...so I'd have to stay on the pavement. I will pedal the entire time...for the cardio-vascular
benefit and to stop leg cramps...plus weight loss (have not seen my knees while standing in years).
I will in all likelihood use a pedal-assist e-motor with 9 heavy batteries in the trailer for
hills/mountains/headwinds...again not something I want sliding into a ditch.

So the question is: in your bent cycling experience on the highways, will cars & trucks respect your
right to be on the pavement and pass you or do they force you to the left and into the ditch? I know
that everyone will have different experiences with this, different highway networks, different
temperment of auto users etc., I just need some reassurance that I will make it to the Pacific
without getting their being dragged under the rear wheels of a truck.

So far I have Bear attacks, Attack Dogs, Mountain Lion attacks, Rednecks in pickup trucks and
Lightning covered...1st 4 = ride with a Flare Gun, a slab of raw meat and a "I Luv the KKK"
bumper sticker.

Joshua
*****


Most riders chose west to east to traverse Canada due to the prevailing winds. That is definitly the way I would do it.
I am an over the road truck driver, and I ran across Canada for many years. I also cycled many stretches of the T.Can, although I have never done a complete cross country ride. I am very familiar with the highway, so hopefuly I can offer something useful.
Leaving Vancouver, you will have to follow highway 7 for the first while, as bicycles are prohibited from the T.Can. You can rejoin the highway at Chilliwack, or you can continue on route 7, and catch it just north of Hope.
From there, you have a couple of options. You can stick with the T.Can, or you can follow route 3 east to 3A to 6 north, to 23 north to rejoin the T.Can at Revelstoke. Both routes feature some brutal climbs, but the biggest and steepest is on route 3 east of Osoyoos.
If you choose the Trans Canada from hope through the Fraser canyon, there are 7 tunnels through which you must pass. The roadway through these tunnels is very narrow, but there is a walkway along the side with a railing to separate you from traffic. I have cycled this stretch, and other than those tunnels, it is not too bad.
At Lilloet, the highway leaves the Fraser river and joins the Thompson. There are a couple of places north of Lilloet that will be extemely dangerous. Here the highway is very narrow and curvy, and when oncomming trucks meet, there is not room for a whisker between them . There are only 2 stretches like that , and they are quite short, but they will be tense.
When you reach Kamloops, you will have to exit the highway, as bicycles are not alowed on the highway through town. There are signs telling you where to get off, but I don't know if the route is marked through town.
From Kamloops to Golden, the riding will be good. Lots of big climbs, but fairly safe. Be sure to have your lights and reflective clothing on when you enter the snow sheds in Rogers Pass, as they are very dark inside. Most of the snow sheds have a dirt path outside, I would reccomend using them.
East of Golden is Kicking horse Pass. Just for kicks, stop at the Golden Truck scale and check all the pictures on the wall of the wrecks that have graced that piece of highway over the years. After seeing that, I am quite certain you will want to avoid that, and take route 95 south from Golden to Radium, catch 93 north to Banff, and rejoin the T.Can. At this point, you are still in the mountains, but the riding is easy.
To bypass the highway route through Calgary, I suggest using the pathway system through town. You can get on the bow river pathway at the west end of town, and run it all the way through. I don't remember exactly how to do it, but you can link up with the canal pathway that takes you out to Chestermere Lake where you can rejoin the highway east of the city.( these 2 pathways do not intersect, but they are close together at Ogden Road and 50th ave. I am sure the locals can guide you.)
Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba will present no special problems, but Ontario is another matter. To begin with, Ontario is big. Very big. When you reach the Manitoba Ontario border, you are only a little over half way from Vancouver to Toronto. Also, the road is narrow and curvy with limited sight lines. If I come barreling around one of those cuves and another truck comes the other way, and you, me and the other truck all arrive together, guess what. You lose.
I stongly reccomend going through the US around the south side of Lake Superior. Go south on route 71 east of Kenora to Fort Frances and accross the border into Minnisota.
I am getting much more verbose here than I intened to. I have much more I could say, but I think I'll cut it off here so you don't fall asleep reading this.
Just one more comment on your trip.
JUST DO IT !
 
S

Sticker Jim

Guest
There are a fair number of stretches on the TC highway being
repaved, completed with paved shoulders. It might not be as
bad as you think. A quick email to some of the areas before
you leave might get you some info on the status of their
stretches of the highway. Additionally they might be able to
tell you about their sections of the bike trail too.

In my experience though, riding trikes and bents on 70 to
100kph roadways, the novelty factor of drivers seeing them
on the roadway seems to outweigh the desire for spitefulness
at us slowing them down slightly or causing them to have to
swerve around us.

> So the question is: in your bent cycling experience on the
> highways, will cars & trucks respect your right to be on
> the pavement and pass you or do they force you to the left
> and into the ditch? I know that everyone will have
> different experiences with this, different highway
> networks,
different
> temperment of auto users etc., I just need some
> reassurance that I will
make
> it to the Pacific without getting their being dragged
> under the rear
wheels
> of a truck.
 
E

Evsolutions

Guest
WOW and Thanx I will plot what you wrote on my road map and
I am starting to think going across the Northern USA might
be safer (at least to swing under & bypass the Canadian
Rockies) and come up from Blaine Washington.

Joshua
*****
"Dan Burkhart" <[email protected]> wrote in
message news:p[email protected]...
> Evsolutions wrote:
> > I have not been on a Highway (on a bicycle) for almost
> > 30 years and although I did cycle city to city in the
> > early 70's, it was on a 10 speed and I spent a lot of
> > time going into a ditch or riding on soft shoulders to
> > avoid the 18 wheel tractor trailers. My planned ride
> > this summer is going to place me on the Trans-Canada
> > Highway for several thousand miles and since I began
> > riding recumbents in 1978 I developed this fear of
> > ditches re: I refuse to ride on the shoulder of a road
> > or in the curb lane. I am wondering how sane it will
> > be to ride a Highway (in traffic), meaning travel in
> > the same lane as the cars and tractor trailers and
> > expect them to go around me as opposed to going over
> > me? I will be using a tadpole with a 6 foot long
> > trailer (not something I would want to be driving into
> > a ditch). A tadpole will slide into a ditch on loose
> > gravel...found on the shoulders of roads...so I'd have
> > to stay on the pavement. I will pedal the entire
> > time...for the cardio-vascular benefit and to stop leg
> > cramps...plus weight loss (have not seen my knees
> > while standing in years). I will in all likelihood use
> > a pedal-assist e-motor with 9 heavy batteries in the
> > trailer for hills/mountains/headwinds...again not
> > something I want sliding into a ditch. So the question
> > is: in your bent cycling experience on the highways,
> > will cars & trucks respect your right to be on the
> > pavement and pass
you
> > or do they force you to the left and into the ditch? I
> > know that everyone will have different experiences
> > with this, different highway networks, different
> > temperment of auto users etc., I just need some
> > reassurance that I will make it to the Pacific without
> > getting their being dragged under the rear wheels of a
> > truck. So far I have Bear attacks, Attack Dogs,
> > Mountain Lion attacks,
Rednecks
> > in pickup trucks and Lightning covered...1st 4 = ride
> > with a Flare
Gun,
> > a slab of raw meat and a "I Luv the KKK" bumper
> > sticker. Joshua
> > *****
>
>
>
>
> Most riders chose west to east to traverse Canada due to
> the prevailing winds. That is definitly the way I would
> do it. I am an over the road truck driver, and I ran
> across Canada for many years. I also cycled many
> stretches of the T.Can, although I have never done a
> complete cross country ride. I am very familiar with the
> highway, so hopefuly I can offer something useful.
> Leaving Vancouver, you will have to follow highway 7 for
> the first while, as bicycles are prohibited from the
> T.Can. You can rejoin the highway at Chilliwack, or you
> can continue on route 7, and catch it just north of
> Hope. From there, you have a couple of options. You can
> stick with the T.Can, or you can follow route 3 east to
> 3A to 6 north, to 23 north to rejoin the T.Can at
> Revelstoke. Both routes feature some brutal climbs, but
> the biggest and steepest is on route 3 east of Osoyoos.
> If you choose the Trans Canada from hope through the
> Fraser canyon, there are 7 tunnels through which you
> must pass. The roadway through these tunnels is very
> narrow, but there is a walkway along the side with a
> railing to separate you from traffic. I have cycled
> this stretch, and other than those tunnels, it is not
> too bad. At Lilloet, the highway leaves the Fraser
> river and joins the Thompson. There are a couple of
> places north of Lilloet that will be extemely
> dangerous. Here the highway is very narrow and curvy,
> and when oncomming trucks meet, there is not room for a
> whisker between them . There are only 2 stretches like
> that , and they are quite short, but they will be
> tense. When you reach Kamloops, you will have to exit
> the highway, as bicycles are not alowed on the highway
> through town. There are signs telling you where to get
> off, but I don't know if the route is marked through
> town. From Kamloops to Golden, the riding will be good.
> Lots of big climbs, but fairly safe. Be sure to have
> your lights and reflective clothing on when you enter
> the snow sheds in Rogers Pass, as they are very dark
> inside. Most of the snow sheds have a dirt path
> outside, I would reccomend using them. East of Golden
> is Kicking horse Pass. Just for kicks, stop at the
> Golden Truck scale and check all the pictures on the
> wall of the wrecks that have graced that piece of
> highway over the years. After seeing that, I am quite
> certain you will want to avoid that, and take route 95
> south from Golden to Radium, catch 93 north to Banff,
> and rejoin the T.Can. At this point, you are still in
> the mountains, but the riding is easy. To bypass the
> highway route through Calgary, I suggest using the
> pathway system through town. You can get on the bow
> river pathway at the west end of town, and run it all
> the way through. I don't remember exactly how to do it,
> but you can link up with the canal pathway that takes
> you out to Chestermere Lake where you can rejoin the
> highway east of the city.( these 2 pathways do not
> intersect, but they are close together at Ogden Road
> and 50th ave. I am sure the locals can guide you.)
> Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba will present no
> special problems, but Ontario is another matter. To
> begin with, Ontario is big. Very big. When you reach
> the Manitoba Ontario border, you are only a little over
> half way from Vancouver to Toronto. Also, the road is
> narrow and curvy with limited sight lines. If I come
> barreling around one of those cuves and another truck
> comes the other way, and you, me and the other truck
> all arrive together, guess what. You lose. I stongly
> reccomend going through the US around the south side of
> Lake Superior. Go south on route 71 east of Kenora to
> Fort Frances and accross the border into Minnisota. I
> am getting much more verbose here than I intened to. I
> have much more I could say, but I think I'll cut it off
> here so you don't fall asleep reading this. Just one
> more comment on your trip. JUST DO IT !
>
>
>
> --
 
T

Tom Sherman

Guest
EVSolutions wrote:

> ... So far I have Bear attacks, Attack Dogs, Mountain Lion
> attacks, Rednecks in pickup trucks and Lightning
> covered...

As for the last item, do you have a bad history dealing with
Tim Brummer? ;)

Tom Sherman - Quad Cities (Illinois Side)
 
E

Evsolutions

Guest
Thanx As for being mowed down by cars and trucks hitting me
form the rear. My wife spent sometime today at the Bike Show
listening to Jay Dixon describe her experiences with her
Greenspeed and now my wife is convinced she will follow me
with her tadpole...so she gets it 1st. Just have to make
sure we don't ride too close together.

Was thinking every day someone is crossing Canada on foot,
crutches, artificial limbs, on horseback or on rollerblades
etc. to raise money for some charity and they get a monster
gas guzzling Winnebago to tag along behind...maybe we can
join their caravan and not have to worry about some sleep
deprived trucker in an 18 wheeler mowing us down

Joshua
*****
"Sticker Jim" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:WMN2c.139-
[email protected]
> There are a fair number of stretches on the TC highway
> being repaved, completed with paved shoulders. It might
> not be as bad as you think. A quick email to some of the
> areas before you leave might get you some info
on
> the status of their stretches of the highway. Additionally
> they might be able to tell you about their sections of the
> bike trail too.
>
> In my experience though, riding trikes and bents on 70 to
> 100kph roadways, the novelty factor of drivers seeing them
> on the roadway seems to outweigh the desire for
> spitefulness at us slowing them down slightly or causing
them
> to have to swerve around us.
>
> > So the question is: in your bent cycling experience on
> > the highways,
will
> > cars & trucks respect your right to be on the pavement
> > and pass you or
do
> > they force you to the left and into the ditch? I know
> > that everyone will have different experiences with this,
> > different highway networks,
> different
> > temperment of auto users etc., I just need some
> > reassurance that I will
> make
> > it to the Pacific without getting their being dragged
> > under the rear
> wheels
> > of a truck.
 
E

Edward Dolan

Guest
"EVSolutions" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

> WOW and Thanx I will plot what you wrote on my road map
> and I am starting to think going across the Northern USA
> might be safer (at least to swing under & bypass the
> Canadian Rockies) and come up from Blaine Washington.
>
> Joshua
[...]

Joshua, I want to see you get to Vancouver all in on piece,
so I would carefully consider a route through the northern
US instead of staying strictly in Canada. Without getting
out my maps and having a close look at them (I leave that to
you as that is half the fun of doing a trip), I can tell you
from experience that I can see two main trouble spots with
an all-Canadian passage. The first is northern Ontario, a
really huge area. The roads just peter out up there and you
will be on a major highway for many hundreds of miles. The
second major trouble spot will be British Columbia through
the Rocky Mountains. There are never any good secondary
roads once you get into the mountains. From Winnipeg to
Calgary it should be easy to select a good route. Those
prairie provinces have lots of secondary roads and the
traffic should be light on them.

But consider the northern US. You will have good secondary
roads all the way across (but go via the Upper Peninsula of
Michigan and do not even think of going anywhere near
Chicago) until you get to the Rockies in Montana and the
Cascades in Washington and even then you may be able to
find a good way across those mountain ranges. If all else
fails, you should be able to cross the Rockies and the
Cascades on Interstate 90 as it has good shoulders and I
think bicycles are allowed on them in the Western states.
Then you could approach Vancouver from the south via
Seattle on secondary roads.

I think crossing the Rockies in Montana and Idaho could be a
bit difficult but if you decide to give up on the ultimate
scenic route via Glacier National Park always remember that
you can get over the mountains there (and in Washington too)
via Interstate 90. I would also stay away from extreme
northern Washington and go further south as most of eastern
Washington is relatively flat. Another way across the
Cascades is via the Columbia River gorge.

Michigan, Wisconsin and Minnesota should make for very
pleasant cycling. The Dakotas and Montana can be grim unless
you really like the wide open spaces and being windswept.
The Mountains of the Far West are beautiful of course, but
present difficulties. The final stretch up to Vancouver you
will be back in the land of cities and suburbs and traffic.
Choosing wisely the roads you will ride on is half the trick
to having a good tour.

If you are going to be on a tadpole trike pulling a
trailer you do not want to be in the mountains any more
than absolutely necessary. But the main thing is always
to be safe. I will go many hundreds of miles out of my
way in order to get a good selection of roads that are
safe for cycling.

Regards,

Ed Dolan - Minnesota
 
J

Jack Davis

Guest
"EVSolutions" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> I have not been on a Highway (on a bicycle) for almost 30
> years and
although
> I did cycle city to city in the early 70's, it was on a 10
> speed and I
spent
> a lot of time going into a ditch or riding on soft
> shoulders to avoid the
18
> wheel tractor trailers. My planned ride this summer is
> going to place me
on
> the Trans-Canada Highway for several thousand miles and
> since I began
riding
> recumbents in 1978 I developed this fear of ditches re: I
> refuse to ride
on
> the shoulder of a road or in the curb lane. I am wondering
> how sane it will be to ride a Highway (in traffic),
> meaning travel in the same lane as the cars and tractor
> trailers and expect them
to
> go around me as opposed to going over me? I will be using
> a tadpole with a 6 foot long trailer (not something I
would
> want to be driving into a ditch). A tadpole will slide
> into a ditch on
loose
> gravel...found on the shoulders of roads...so I'd have to
> stay on the pavement. I will pedal the entire time...for
> the cardio-vascular benefit and to stop leg cramps...plus
> weight loss (have not seen my knees while standing in
> years). I will in all likelihood use a pedal-assist e-
> motor with 9 heavy batteries in the trailer for
> hills/mountains/headwinds...again not something I want
> sliding into a ditch.
>
> So the question is: in your bent cycling experience on the
> highways, will cars & trucks respect your right to be on
> the pavement and pass you or do they force you to the left
> and into the ditch? I know that everyone will have
> different experiences with this, different highway
> networks,
different
> temperment of auto users etc., I just need some
> reassurance that I will
make
> it to the Pacific without getting their being dragged
> under the rear
wheels
> of a truck.
>
> So far I have Bear attacks, Attack Dogs, Mountain Lion
> attacks, Rednecks
in
> pickup trucks and Lightning covered...1st 4 = ride with a
> Flare Gun, a
slab
> of raw meat and a "I Luv the KKK" bumper sticker.
>
> Joshua
> *****

Joshua and others,

I am not experienced in cross country biking but I do not
see the logic of towing a trailer full of heavy batteries,
(and charger) and hauling the weight of a motor for 100% of
the time when it may only be of use 15 to 20% of the time.
And, where do you intend to plug in the charger? And, most
of the setups I have seen are only good for a couple of
hours. You may find it difficult to get over the mountains
in that amount of time.

If anyone has actually tried this I would very much like to
read about you experience.

Thanks for any information,

Jack
 

Dan Burkhart

New Member
Nov 27, 2003
333
0
0
69
Originally posted by Edward Dolan
"EVSolutions" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

> WOW and Thanx I will plot what you wrote on my road map
> and I am starting to think going across the Northern USA
> might be safer (at least to swing under & bypass the
> Canadian Rockies) and come up from Blaine Washington.
>
> Joshua
[...]

Joshua, I want to see you get to Vancouver all in on piece,
so I would carefully consider a route through the northern
US instead of staying strictly in Canada. Without getting
out my maps and having a close look at them (I leave that to
you as that is half the fun of doing a trip), I can tell you
from experience that I can see two main trouble spots with
an all-Canadian passage. The first is northern Ontario, a
really huge area. The roads just peter out up there and you
will be on a major highway for many hundreds of miles. The
second major trouble spot will be British Columbia through
the Rocky Mountains. There are never any good secondary
roads once you get into the mountains. From Winnipeg to
Calgary it should be easy to select a good route. Those
prairie provinces have lots of secondary roads and the
traffic should be light on them.

But consider the northern US. You will have good secondary
roads all the way across (but go via the Upper Peninsula of
Michigan and do not even think of going anywhere near
Chicago) until you get to the Rockies in Montana and the
Cascades in Washington and even then you may be able to
find a good way across those mountain ranges. If all else
fails, you should be able to cross the Rockies and the
Cascades on Interstate 90 as it has good shoulders and I
think bicycles are allowed on them in the Western states.
Then you could approach Vancouver from the south via
Seattle on secondary roads.

I think crossing the Rockies in Montana and Idaho could be a
bit difficult but if you decide to give up on the ultimate
scenic route via Glacier National Park always remember that
you can get over the mountains there (and in Washington too)
via Interstate 90. I would also stay away from extreme
northern Washington and go further south as most of eastern
Washington is relatively flat. Another way across the
Cascades is via the Columbia River gorge.

Michigan, Wisconsin and Minnesota should make for very
pleasant cycling. The Dakotas and Montana can be grim unless
you really like the wide open spaces and being windswept.
The Mountains of the Far West are beautiful of course, but
present difficulties. The final stretch up to Vancouver you
will be back in the land of cities and suburbs and traffic.
Choosing wisely the roads you will ride on is half the trick
to having a good tour.

If you are going to be on a tadpole trike pulling a
trailer you do not want to be in the mountains any more
than absolutely necessary. But the main thing is always
to be safe. I will go many hundreds of miles out of my
way in order to get a good selection of roads that are
safe for cycling.

Regards,

Ed Dolan - Minnesota


I would certainly look for alternatives to northern Ontario, but I wouldn't be too quick to write off the trip through the Canadian rockies.
There is a rail trail that traverses much of the B.C. interior known as the Kettle valley rail trail. I am not sure of the stage of completion, or the condition of the trail surface, but if you initiate a search on it , there is lots of info available.
Unfortunately, last year's forest fires destroyed some of the trestles, particularly in the Myra Canyon.
One thing about rail trails, the grade never exceeds 2%, but you still get the spectacular view.
There are tour operators that do supported tours on the line, maybe hooking up with one of them would be a good idea
 
E

Evsolutions

Guest
Thanks again I will look into all the routes as I get closer
to pushing off. I met a chap yesterday into tadpoles who
might build me a tandem. My life is getting so seriously
mixed up and yet still manages to bore me silly that I am
giving some consideration to becoming a Homeless person for
at least a year. I can think of much worse lifestyles than
to pedal my buns ocean to ocean and not be tied down to
digital cable TV and rent.

Funny Story: I went to the Toronto Bike Show
yesterday...about 8 miles from my apt. I rode my CLWB. About
2 minutes out the door a total whiteout blizzard began. Then
I noticed the cable was off my front brake...but I was in a
hurry and figured heh one brake still works and I continued
on (downhill). Averaged about 25 mph and got every green
traffic light...I am truly blessed. Actually the snow was so
heavy and visability so poor I wasn't even sure if I was
still on the road half the trip. I get to the bike show,
spend the whole show chatting with the bent folks and go
outside...still snowing, but mixed with freezing rain and it
is now 8 miles up hill. I had to stop every 2 blocks and
clear my amber lens goggles to make sure I wasn't riding on
a front lawn. I get home drenched and shivering and am
totally amazed I did not fall once or side swipe a car. This
was the ride from hell and I made it home in one piece. This
was the kind of ride you just know you are going to be
killed by a car doing and beating odds is just way too
exciting to describe.

Feeling tuckered out and my heart racing I got naked &
decided to lay on the bed to calm down. My bed is elevated
to waist level (storage beneath). I mount the bed and
feeling really sore, but good and one of my cats starts
licking my big toe....how sweet. Then it grinds its teeth
into my big toe and I sit up suddenly to pull the cat off my
toe and I slid off the bed and hit the floor face down.
Grabbing a hi-boy chest of drawers on my way down...the 24V
battery and charger on top then fell, luckily the battery
pack missed me, but the charger hit my back...the cat is
still stuck to my toe and I am shaking my foot to get the
cat off and I kicked over an ironing board the wife set
up...iron came down on my leg. My other cat (the big fat
Maine Coon) is now on the bed looking down at me on the
floor and sees his girlfriend having fun with my toe...he
jumps off the bed and lands on my side...this is a 22 pound
cat with huge claws. I made the observation that all the
really nasty and painfull stuff happens when your are still
awake to feel it and THEN you pass out. Why can't one
passout 1st and miss the carnage that follows.

I am now laying there crumpled up on the floor and
needing First Aide, the cat is still attached but I
cannot feel my foot anymore & I am thinking what a damn
good cyclist I am, but I really need to get out of my apt
before my apt kills me.

Joshua
*****

> I would certainly look for alternatives to northern
> Ontario, but I wouldn't be too quick to write off the
> trip through the Canadian rockies. There is a rail trail
> that traverses much of the B.C. interior known as the
> Kettle valley rail trail. I am not sure of the stage of
> completion, or the condition of the trail surface, but if
> you initiate a search on it , there is lots of info
> available. Unfortunately, last year's forest fires
> destroyed some of the trestles, particularly in the Myra
> Canyon. One thing about rail trails, the grade never
> exceeds 2%, but you still get the spectacular view. There
> are tour operators that do supported tours on the line,
> maybe hooking up with one of them would be a good idea
 
E

Evsolutions

Guest
Sorry I did not properly explain this part in case Cletus
Lee bites my head off.

I have Osteoarthritis in my knees and pedal use can be a
real pain sometimes and the wife has a heart condition
that affects her balance and breathing...we are total
winners together.

I pay the rent (at least that is the theory) by Marketing
cycling products for other companies and I have my own
company selling battery powered Hub Motors to
cyclists...many of whom are into recumbents due to physical
challenges of their own. This trip will be my way to meet
all my former customers and preach to the masses about E-
Powered recumbents and I have been invited to meet many bent
makers..this is .kinda of a modern version of selling
Bottles of Distilled Damnation from a Wagon. My trailer will
have 9 batteries, the motor uses 3 at a time. The range on 3
will be appprox'ly 30 miles with light, but steady pedal
use. As the 3 are discharged I will flip a toggle switch to
engage another 3 batteries and then the final 3. There are 2
Fast battery chargers that will be charging the battery
packs all the time as they are discharged. There is a very
small Yamaha generator with an inverter and this will power
the chargers. The E-motor is an E-TEK, which will power a
small car...so it will have the torque to climb a tree in a
tadpole. This E-Motor peaks at 9,000 watts. You could use a
recumbent and hit 100 mph using this e-motor. The ones I
sell are only 500W & 750W and they cruise at 30 mph on a
bent. Quite a few ARBR members are using these motors on
their low racers and LWBs...and trikes of course. I try to
avoid mentioning the evil word Motor on a HPV Newsgroup lest
I get yelled at. Reality is though an e-motor is keeping a
lot us on our bents and may yet prove to be the fastest way
to get DF cyclists and car users to switch to
bents....ohhhhh shameless advertising content.

Oh and just to make everyone drool. My business is now
geared to my being mobile. I can spend a year on a tadpole
with a Laptop PC & cellphone while using drop shipping. Hey
I wanna be homeless, not jobless. This is one of those
chosen lifestyles that have mutated into a career.

www.evsolutions.net

> Joshua ,
>
> I am not experienced in cross country biking but I do not
> see the logic of towing a trailer full of heavy batteries,
> (and charger) and hauling the weight of a motor for 100%
> of the time when it may only be of use 15 to
20%
> of the time. And, where do you intend to plug in the
> charger? And, most
of
> the setups I have seen are only good for a couple of
> hours. You may find
it
> difficult to get over the mountains in that amount
> of time.
>
> If anyone has actually tried this I would very much like
> to read about you experience.
>
> Thanks for any information,
>
> Jack
 
E

Edward Dolan

Guest
"EVSolutions" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

[...]

> My life is getting so seriously mixed up and yet still
> manages to bore me silly that I am giving some
> consideration to becoming a Homeless person for at least a
> year. I can think of much worse lifestyles than to pedal
> my buns ocean to ocean and not be tied down to digital
> cable TV and rent.
[...]

>Hey I wanna be homeless, not jobless.

I am now going to give you some advice and I will not even
charge you for it. Forget about being homeless, with or
without a job.

I once played at that (being homeless) for about 6 months
when I was young and healthy (which I gather you are no
longer either) and it was just about the most miserable
period of my life. I had a bit of money but it was a
constant scramble to just get through the day. All my waking
hours were taken up with just the most simple elementary
problems of living. Just figuring out where and how I was
going to sleep for the night was a major event. There is
absolutely nothing Romantic about being homeless. In fact,
it was so darn un-Romantic that I ended up joining the Navy,
which permanently cured me of any and all Romantic notions
for the rest of my life.

I spent a month in Seattle recently being treated for
prostate cancer at the VA there and I would spend several
hours everyday in downtown Seattle. There you see thousands
of homeless people wandering the streets in all their
misery. None of them looked happy to me. You are far better
off as a working stiff than as a homeless person.

When I was young you could stay in a furnished room for
about $25. a month. I suspect the prices have risen
considerably from those days, but that is what I would
recommend if you want to simplify your life. Being homeless
will not simplify your life. Instead it will complicate it
like you wouldn't believe. Forget about being homeless!

With respect to your cat story, always remember these
little creatures have very small brains and are mostly
acting on instinct 100% of the time. It is our job to
figure them out and not vice versa. After all, we are the
creatures with really big brains who are NOT operating on
instinct 100% of the time.

Regards,

Ed Dolan - Minnesota
 
J

Jack Davis

Guest
Oh..and another WOW...and good luck and have fun and how
much would a rig like that cost if you were to sell one?

Jack, (Not too fond of work) Davis

"EVSolutions" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> Sorry I did not properly explain this part in case Cletus
> Lee bites my
head
> off.
>
> I have Osteoarthritis in my knees and pedal use can be a
> real pain
sometimes
> and the wife has a heart condition that affects her
> balance and breathing...we are total winners together.
>
> I pay the rent (at least that is the theory) by Marketing
> cycling products for other companies and I have my own
> company selling battery powered Hub Motors to
> cyclists...many of whom are into recumbents due to
> physical challenges of their own. This trip will be my way
> to meet all my former customers and preach to the masses
> about E-Powered recumbents and I have been invited to meet
> many bent makers..this is .kinda of a modern version
of
> selling Bottles of Distilled Damnation from a Wagon. My
> trailer will have
9
> batteries, the motor uses 3 at a time. The range on 3 will
> be appprox'ly
30
> miles with light, but steady pedal use. As the 3 are
> discharged I will
flip
> a toggle switch to engage another 3 batteries and then the
> final 3. There are 2 Fast battery chargers that will be
> charging the battery packs all
the
> time as they are discharged. There is a very small Yamaha
> generator with
an
> inverter and this will power the chargers. The E-motor is
> an E-TEK, which will power a small car...so it will have
> the torque to climb a tree in a tadpole. This E-Motor
> peaks at 9,000 watts. You could use a recumbent and hit
> 100 mph using this e-motor. The ones I sell are only 500W
> & 750W and they cruise at 30 mph on a bent. Quite a few
> ARBR members are using these motors on their low racers
> and LWBs...and trikes of course. I try to avoid mentioning
> the evil word Motor on a HPV Newsgroup lest I get yelled
> at. Reality is though an e-motor is keeping a lot us on
> our bents and may yet prove to be the fastest way to get
> DF cyclists and car users to switch to bents....ohhhhh
> shameless advertising content.
>
> Oh and just to make everyone drool. My business is now
> geared to my being mobile. I can spend a year on a tadpole
> with a Laptop PC & cellphone while using drop shipping.
> Hey I wanna be homeless, not jobless. This is one of those
> chosen lifestyles that have mutated into a career.
>
> www.evsolutions.net
>
>
> > Joshua ,
> >
> > I am not experienced in cross country biking but I do
> > not see the logic
of
> > towing a trailer full of heavy batteries, (and charger)
> > and hauling the weight of a motor for 100% of the time
> > when it may only be of use 15 to
> 20%
> > of the time. And, where do you intend to plug in the
> > charger? And,
most
> of
> > the setups I have seen are only good for a couple of
> > hours. You may
find
> it
> > difficult to get over the mountains in that amount
> > of time.
> >
> > If anyone has actually tried this I would very much like
> > to read about
you
> > experience.
> >
> > Thanks for any information,
> >
> > Jack
 
E

Evsolutions

Guest
How Much In USD?

E-TEK $400.00 150A Controller $400. Twin Fast Chargers
$160.00 Generator with Inverter $800.00 9 x 12V x 26Ah SLA
battery Packs $450.00 Electric controls/wiring/Anderson
Powerpoles $150.00 Trailer (Thule) on own under carriage
$450.00 Tadpole (Tandem)...being made in 4130 for $1800.00
Beer Keg with hose in place of Hydration Packs (optional) I
may yet go with a Crystalyte 2,000 watt Hub motor and a
custom made controller (saves $500.00) Used Generator saves
another $300.00. The SLA batteries are cheap but 216 pounds
and twin chargers add 14 pounds (230 lbs) IF I went with Lithium-
Ion cells & 2 Li-ion chargers I can reduce the total weight
to only (54 lbs).

"Jack Davis" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> Oh..and another WOW...and good luck and have fun and how
> much would a rig like that cost if you were to sell one?
>
> Jack, (Not too fond of work) Davis
>
> "EVSolutions" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]...
> > Sorry I did not properly explain this part in case
> > Cletus Lee bites my
> head
> > off.
> >
> > I have Osteoarthritis in my knees and pedal use can be a
> > real pain
> sometimes
> > and the wife has a heart condition that affects her
> > balance and breathing...we are total winners together.
> >
> > I pay the rent (at least that is the theory) by
> > Marketing cycling
products
> > for other companies and I have my own company selling
> > battery powered
Hub
> > Motors to cyclists...many of whom are into recumbents
> > due to physical challenges of their own. This trip will
> > be my way to meet all my former customers and preach to
> > the masses about E-Powered recumbents and I have been
> > invited to meet many bent makers..this is .kinda of a
> > modern
version
> of
> > selling Bottles of Distilled Damnation from a Wagon. My
> > trailer will
have
> 9
> > batteries, the motor uses 3 at a time. The range on 3
> > will be appprox'ly
> 30
> > miles with light, but steady pedal use. As the 3 are
> > discharged I will
> flip
> > a toggle switch to engage another 3 batteries and then
> > the final 3.
There
> > are 2 Fast battery chargers that will be charging the
> > battery packs all
> the
> > time as they are discharged. There is a very small
> > Yamaha generator with
> an
> > inverter and this will power the chargers. The E-motor
> > is an E-TEK,
which
> > will power a small car...so it will have the torque to
> > climb a tree in a tadpole. This E-Motor peaks at 9,000
> > watts. You could use a recumbent
and
> > hit 100 mph using this e-motor. The ones I sell are only
> > 500W & 750W and they cruise at 30 mph on a bent. Quite a
> > few ARBR members are using
these
> > motors on their low racers and LWBs...and trikes of
> > course. I try to
avoid
> > mentioning the evil word Motor on a HPV Newsgroup lest I
> > get yelled at. Reality is though an e-motor is keeping a
> > lot us on our bents and may
yet
> > prove to be the fastest way to get DF cyclists and car
> > users to switch
to
> > bents....ohhhhh shameless advertising content.
> >
> > Oh and just to make everyone drool. My business is now
> > geared to my
being
> > mobile. I can spend a year on a tadpole with a Laptop PC
> > & cellphone
while
> > using drop shipping. Hey I wanna be homeless, not
> > jobless. This is one
of
> > those chosen lifestyles that have mutated into a career.
> >
> > www.evsolutions.net
> >
> >
> > > Joshua ,
> > >
> > > I am not experienced in cross country biking but I do
> > > not see the
logic
> of
> > > towing a trailer full of heavy batteries, (and
> > > charger) and hauling
the
> > > weight of a motor for 100% of the time when it may
> > > only be of use 15
to
> > 20%
> > > of the time. And, where do you intend to plug in the
> > > charger? And,
> most
> > of
> > > the setups I have seen are only good for a couple of
> > > hours. You may
> find
> > it
> > > difficult to get over the mountains in that amount of
> > > time.
> > >
> > > If anyone has actually tried this I would very much
> > > like to read about
> you
> > > experience.
> > >
> > > Thanks for any information,
> > >
> > > Jack
> >
>