HIIT help, please

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by [email protected], Jan 8, 2006.

  1. Would this workout be good for HIIT?


    Wake up at 5:30 AM, stretch, warm-up walking for 2-3 minutes, then
    sprint for a minute (making sure I'm out of breath), walk for a minute
    and a half, and repeat until the timer gets to 15. Then walk for 5
    minutes at a slow pace, get off the treadmill, and wait an hour to eat
    breakfast and then go to school.
     
    Tags:


  2. Hobbes

    Hobbes Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] wrote:

    > Would this workout be good for HIIT?
    >
    >
    > Wake up at 5:30 AM, stretch, warm-up walking for 2-3 minutes, then
    > sprint for a minute (making sure I'm out of breath), walk for a minute
    > and a half, and repeat until the timer gets to 15. Then walk for 5
    > minutes at a slow pace, get off the treadmill, and wait an hour to eat
    > breakfast and then go to school.
    >


    2 intervals isn't very much.

    Do a google search for "Tabata Interval" for a more scientific approach.

    --
    Keith
     
  3. Jason Earl

    Jason Earl Guest

    [email protected] writes:

    > Would this workout be good for HIIT?
    >
    >
    > Wake up at 5:30 AM, stretch, warm-up walking for 2-3 minutes,
    > then sprint for a minute (making sure I'm out of breath), walk for a
    > minute and a half, and repeat until the timer gets to 15. Then walk
    > for 5 minutes at a slow pace, get off the treadmill, and wait an
    > hour to eat breakfast and then go to school.


    I don't know if it is HIIT, but it will probably get you fit. The
    only problem that I see is that it is pretty hard for me to really
    sprint on a treadmill. Of course I tend to use shorter intervals so I
    am probably moving a little faster. I am also probably a lot bigger
    than you (225 lbs); I don't fit so well on a treadmill.

    Good luck,
    Jason
     
  4. JRH

    JRH Guest

    On Mon, 09 Jan 2006 11:44:44 -0600, Hobbes <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>,
    > [email protected] wrote:
    >
    >> Would this workout be good for HIIT?
    >>
    >>
    >> Wake up at 5:30 AM, stretch, warm-up walking for 2-3 minutes, then
    >> sprint for a minute (making sure I'm out of breath), walk for a minute
    >> and a half, and repeat until the timer gets to 15. Then walk for 5
    >> minutes at a slow pace, get off the treadmill, and wait an hour to eat
    >> breakfast and then go to school.
    >>

    >
    >2 intervals isn't very much.
    >
    >Do a google search for "Tabata Interval" for a more scientific approach.


    It is considered that the Graded Exercise Protocol (GXP) can be just
    as effective as Tabata, without the inherent health/heart risks for
    the average person with limited time available.
     
  5. Dally

    Dally Guest

    [email protected] wrote:

    > Would this workout be good for HIIT?
    >
    >
    > Wake up at 5:30 AM, stretch, warm-up walking for 2-3 minutes, then
    > sprint for a minute (making sure I'm out of breath), walk for a minute
    > and a half, and repeat until the timer gets to 15.


    So you sprint at minutes 3.0, 5.5, 9.0, 12.5?

    A couple of comments. One of the reasons HIIT is good for you is the
    active recovery element. Walking for a minute and a half may be too
    much walking. You're missing the intermediate levels.

    I'd recommend walking/jogging for half a mile, then doing an all out
    sprint for as long as you can hold it (45 seconds, a minute, a minute
    15) and then walk only as long as you need to stop gasping for breath
    and then ramp it up to a jog. After a minute of jogging pick it up to a
    5K race pace, and after another minute do the all-out speed interval again.

    Depending on your conditioning, this might mean you jog at 4.0 mph for 5
    minutes, then sprint at 7.0 mph, then walk at 3.0 for 30 seconds, ramp
    it back up to 4.0 as soon as possible, and then go up to 5.5 before you
    hit 7.0 again.

    > Then walk for 5
    > minutes at a slow pace, get off the treadmill, and wait an hour to eat
    > breakfast and then go to school.


    I don't believe there is any advantage in waiting an hour to eat.

    Dally
     
  6. Jason Earl

    Jason Earl Guest

    JRH <[email protected]> writes:

    > On Mon, 09 Jan 2006 11:44:44 -0600, Hobbes <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>In article <[email protected]>,
    >> [email protected] wrote:
    >>
    >>> Would this workout be good for HIIT?
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Wake up at 5:30 AM, stretch, warm-up walking for 2-3 minutes, then
    >>> sprint for a minute (making sure I'm out of breath), walk for a minute
    >>> and a half, and repeat until the timer gets to 15. Then walk for 5
    >>> minutes at a slow pace, get off the treadmill, and wait an hour to eat
    >>> breakfast and then go to school.
    >>>

    >>
    >>2 intervals isn't very much.
    >>
    >>Do a google search for "Tabata Interval" for a more scientific
    >>approach.

    >
    > It is considered that the Graded Exercise Protocol (GXP) can be just
    > as effective as Tabata, without the inherent health/heart risks for
    > the average person with limited time available.


    Where can I get more info on GXP? Personally, I don't see Tabata
    sprints as being much more dangerous than a rousing game of soccer,
    and I really like how Tabata-style drills make me feel (after I
    recover), but I am certainly interested in hearing more about
    something that is still effective without being as murderously
    intense.

    Thanks,
    Jason
     
  7. Hobbes

    Hobbes Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Jason Earl <[email protected]> wrote:

    > JRH <[email protected]> writes:
    >
    > > On Mon, 09 Jan 2006 11:44:44 -0600, Hobbes <[email protected]>
    > > wrote:
    > >
    > >>In article <[email protected]>,
    > >> [email protected] wrote:
    > >>
    > >>> Would this workout be good for HIIT?
    > >>>
    > >>>
    > >>> Wake up at 5:30 AM, stretch, warm-up walking for 2-3 minutes, then
    > >>> sprint for a minute (making sure I'm out of breath), walk for a minute
    > >>> and a half, and repeat until the timer gets to 15. Then walk for 5
    > >>> minutes at a slow pace, get off the treadmill, and wait an hour to eat
    > >>> breakfast and then go to school.
    > >>>
    > >>
    > >>2 intervals isn't very much.
    > >>
    > >>Do a google search for "Tabata Interval" for a more scientific
    > >>approach.

    > >
    > > It is considered that the Graded Exercise Protocol (GXP) can be just
    > > as effective as Tabata, without the inherent health/heart risks for
    > > the average person with limited time available.

    >
    > Where can I get more info on GXP? Personally, I don't see Tabata
    > sprints as being much more dangerous than a rousing game of soccer,
    > and I really like how Tabata-style drills make me feel (after I
    > recover), but I am certainly interested in hearing more about
    > something that is still effective without being as murderously
    > intense.


    AFAIK there is no data supporting the effectiveness of the GXP, unlike
    the Tabata which has been exhaustively studied. The main idea is that it
    is easier for the average person to perform and effective enough for
    normal fitness needs.

    --
    Keith
     
  8. JRH

    JRH Guest

    On Mon, 09 Jan 2006 15:47:02 -0700, Jason Earl <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >JRH <[email protected]> writes:
    >
    >> On Mon, 09 Jan 2006 11:44:44 -0600, Hobbes <[email protected]>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>>In article <[email protected]>,
    >>> [email protected] wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Would this workout be good for HIIT?
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> Wake up at 5:30 AM, stretch, warm-up walking for 2-3 minutes, then
    >>>> sprint for a minute (making sure I'm out of breath), walk for a minute
    >>>> and a half, and repeat until the timer gets to 15. Then walk for 5
    >>>> minutes at a slow pace, get off the treadmill, and wait an hour to eat
    >>>> breakfast and then go to school.
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>2 intervals isn't very much.
    >>>
    >>>Do a google search for "Tabata Interval" for a more scientific
    >>>approach.

    >>
    >> It is considered that the Graded Exercise Protocol (GXP) can be just
    >> as effective as Tabata, without the inherent health/heart risks for
    >> the average person with limited time available.

    >
    >Where can I get more info on GXP? Personally, I don't see Tabata
    >sprints as being much more dangerous than a rousing game of soccer,
    >and I really like how Tabata-style drills make me feel (after I
    >recover), but I am certainly interested in hearing more about
    >something that is still effective without being as murderously
    >intense.


    If you are wanting CV and VO2 Max benefits without losing LBM, then
    Tabata is effective, but there is a risk of heart failure if you are
    not already suitably conditioned - and even if you are given the
    levels to which you may aspire or achieve.

    Graded Exercise Protocol (GXP) gives much the same benefits but with a
    much reduced risk. See:

    http://www.fitnessprat.no/showthread.php?t=16088

    http://www.mikementzer.com/stimulation.html

    HTH.
     
  9. JRH

    JRH Guest

    On Mon, 09 Jan 2006 17:04:18 -0600, Hobbes <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>,
    > Jason Earl <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> JRH <[email protected]> writes:
    >>
    >> > On Mon, 09 Jan 2006 11:44:44 -0600, Hobbes <[email protected]>
    >> > wrote:
    >> >
    >> >>In article <[email protected]>,
    >> >> [email protected] wrote:
    >> >>
    >> >>> Would this workout be good for HIIT?
    >> >>>
    >> >>>
    >> >>> Wake up at 5:30 AM, stretch, warm-up walking for 2-3 minutes, then
    >> >>> sprint for a minute (making sure I'm out of breath), walk for a minute
    >> >>> and a half, and repeat until the timer gets to 15. Then walk for 5
    >> >>> minutes at a slow pace, get off the treadmill, and wait an hour to eat
    >> >>> breakfast and then go to school.
    >> >>>
    >> >>
    >> >>2 intervals isn't very much.
    >> >>
    >> >>Do a google search for "Tabata Interval" for a more scientific
    >> >>approach.
    >> >
    >> > It is considered that the Graded Exercise Protocol (GXP) can be just
    >> > as effective as Tabata, without the inherent health/heart risks for
    >> > the average person with limited time available.

    >>
    >> Where can I get more info on GXP? Personally, I don't see Tabata
    >> sprints as being much more dangerous than a rousing game of soccer,
    >> and I really like how Tabata-style drills make me feel (after I
    >> recover), but I am certainly interested in hearing more about
    >> something that is still effective without being as murderously
    >> intense.

    >
    >AFAIK there is no data supporting the effectiveness of the GXP, unlike
    >the Tabata which has been exhaustively studied.


    I believe the two links I gave Jason have been thoroughly studied and
    peer reviewed, as has this further link:

    http://ageless-athletes.com/perfect_gxp.shtml

    >The main idea is that it
    >is easier for the average person to perform and effective enough for
    >normal fitness needs.


    I assume you mean GXP, and there is not doubt that it can be a better
    option than Tabata.
     
  10. Jason Earl

    Jason Earl Guest

    JRH <[email protected]> writes:

    > On Mon, 09 Jan 2006 15:47:02 -0700, Jason Earl <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>JRH <[email protected]> writes:
    >>
    >>> On Mon, 09 Jan 2006 11:44:44 -0600, Hobbes <[email protected]>
    >>> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>In article <[email protected]>,
    >>>> [email protected] wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> Would this workout be good for HIIT?
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Wake up at 5:30 AM, stretch, warm-up walking for 2-3
    >>>>> minutes, then sprint for a minute (making sure I'm out of
    >>>>> breath), walk for a minute and a half, and repeat until the
    >>>>> timer gets to 15. Then walk for 5 minutes at a slow pace, get
    >>>>> off the treadmill, and wait an hour to eat breakfast and then go
    >>>>> to school.
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>2 intervals isn't very much.
    >>>>
    >>>>Do a google search for "Tabata Interval" for a more scientific
    >>>>approach.
    >>>
    >>> It is considered that the Graded Exercise Protocol (GXP) can be
    >>> just as effective as Tabata, without the inherent health/heart
    >>> risks for the average person with limited time available.

    >>
    >>Where can I get more info on GXP? Personally, I don't see Tabata
    >>sprints as being much more dangerous than a rousing game of soccer,
    >>and I really like how Tabata-style drills make me feel (after I
    >>recover), but I am certainly interested in hearing more about
    >>something that is still effective without being as murderously
    >>intense.

    >
    > If you are wanting CV and VO2 Max benefits without losing LBM, then
    > Tabata is effective, but there is a risk of heart failure if you are
    > not already suitably conditioned - and even if you are given the
    > levels to which you may aspire or achieve.
    >
    > Graded Exercise Protocol (GXP) gives much the same benefits but with
    > a much reduced risk. See:
    >
    > http://www.fitnessprat.no/showthread.php?t=16088
    >
    > http://www.mikementzer.com/stimulation.html
    >
    > HTH.


    OK, that makes sense. Before asking I did a bit of googling and the
    hits I turned up for GXP all centered around reaching a moderate level
    of fitness for health reasons (as opposed to performance reasons). I
    didn't find the article at fitnessprat, but I found a similar one on
    the Master Trainer site:

    http://ageless-athletes.com/perfect_gxp.shtml

    For the peanut gallery here's the studies that are cited:

    Chong, D.L., Blair, S.N., Jackson, A.S. Cardiorespiratory fitness,
    body composition, and all-cause and cardiovascular disease
    mortality in men. Am J Clin. Nutr.1999; 69: 373-380.

    Wei, M., Gibbons, L.W., Mitchell, T.L., Kampert, J.B., Chong,
    D.L., Blair, S.N. The association between cardiorespiratory
    fitness and impaired fasting glucose and Type 2 diabetes mellitus
    in men. Ann Intern Med. 1999; 130: 89-96.

    Manson, J.E., Hu, F.B., Rich-Edwards, J.W., Colditz, G.A.,
    Stampfer, M.J., Willett, W.C., Speizer, F.E., Hennekens, C.H. A
    prospective study of walking as compared with vigorous exercise in
    the prevention of coronary heart disease in women. N Engl. J
    Med. 1999; 341: 650-658.

    Basically the idea is that there is a certain amount of fitness that
    provides a huge health benefit. This health benefit is was found to
    be even more important than body composition in determining health
    risks such as heart failure or diabetes. To quote the article:

    Certainly, the minimum level of protection that frankly brings the
    biggest bang for the buck (the biggest benefit is going from unfit
    to modestly fit) is reachable by the vast majority of people
    without much effort.

    The Winett article on Mike Mentzer's site was more interesting, as it
    applied these same ideas to strength athletes and not to sedentary
    folks. The basic premise was that GXP allows you to reach your
    aerobic "genetic limitation" easily and without adding undue stress to
    your system. Here's a quote:

    We could also use the special Tabata interval protocol 2 to 3
    times per week to reach the same fitness goal. We could do the
    same graded warm-up as in the GXP and GXT. Then we could do 6
    full-blast 20 second sprints with only 10 seconds rest between
    each. We would be sure, as called for by the protocol, that our
    subject reached a point of absolute exhaustion at the end of the
    sixth repeat.

    The Tabata protocol can be even more devastating metabolically
    and skeletally than the GXT. This is because you need to go to
    complete exhaustion and because of the fast pace of the sprints.

    So, it isn't clear in the long run if the interval protocol would
    produce any better results than the GXP and over time, it too may
    be worse.

    Personally, I have my doubts. I certainly didn't read any study that
    came close to suggesting that GXP would be better at raising VO2 max
    over time than Tabata interval drills (as the Winett article
    suggests), and I am not interested in getting "fit enough." I want to
    be a super hero. If I am going to go through the trouble of training,
    I don't want to simply be "healthier than the average sedentary male."
    I am not overly concerned that the Tabata drills are going to kill me.
    I'm only 34, with no history of heart problems. I should be able to
    run up and down the block a few times without keeling over.

    Thanks for the info though, it might be useful if I ever get to the
    point where I am simply maintaining myself, or if I ever decide to
    concentrate even more on pure weight training. I can certainly see
    where GXP would fit in if you were only interested in limit strength,
    power, or aesthetics.

    Jason
     
  11. Jason Earl

    Jason Earl Guest

    Hobbes <[email protected]> writes:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Jason Earl <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> JRH <[email protected]> writes:
    >>
    >> > On Mon, 09 Jan 2006 11:44:44 -0600, Hobbes <[email protected]>
    >> > wrote:
    >> >
    >> >>In article <[email protected]>,
    >> >> [email protected] wrote:
    >> >>
    >> >>> Would this workout be good for HIIT?
    >> >>>
    >> >>>
    >> >>> Wake up at 5:30 AM, stretch, warm-up walking for 2-3
    >> >>> minutes, then sprint for a minute (making sure I'm out of
    >> >>> breath), walk for a minute and a half, and repeat until the
    >> >>> timer gets to 15. Then walk for 5 minutes at a slow pace, get
    >> >>> off the treadmill, and wait an hour to eat breakfast and then
    >> >>> go to school.
    >> >>>
    >> >>
    >> >>2 intervals isn't very much.
    >> >>
    >> >>Do a google search for "Tabata Interval" for a more scientific
    >> >>approach.
    >> >
    >> > It is considered that the Graded Exercise Protocol (GXP) can be
    >> > just as effective as Tabata, without the inherent health/heart
    >> > risks for the average person with limited time available.

    >>
    >> Where can I get more info on GXP? Personally, I don't see Tabata
    >> sprints as being much more dangerous than a rousing game of soccer,
    >> and I really like how Tabata-style drills make me feel (after I
    >> recover), but I am certainly interested in hearing more about
    >> something that is still effective without being as murderously
    >> intense.

    >
    > AFAIK there is no data supporting the effectiveness of the GXP,
    > unlike the Tabata which has been exhaustively studied. The main idea
    > is that it is easier for the average person to perform and effective
    > enough for normal fitness needs.


    Yeah, that's what I came up with too. However, I can see how GXP
    would be useful in cases where your goals didn't require much aerobic
    fitness (or if you just wanted to do the minimum amount necessary to
    gain most of the health benefits of exercise).

    Jason
     
  12. DZ

    DZ Guest

    Jason Earl <[email protected]> wrote:
    > JRH wrote:
    >> Graded Exercise Protocol (GXP) gives much the same benefits but with
    >> a much reduced risk. See:
    >>
    >> http://www.fitnessprat.no/showthread.php?t=16088
    >> http://www.mikementzer.com/stimulation.html

    >
    > OK, that makes sense. Before asking I did a bit of googling and the
    > hits I turned up for GXP all centered around reaching a moderate level
    > of fitness for health reasons (as opposed to performance reasons). I
    > didn't find the article at fitnessprat, but I found a similar one on
    > the Master Trainer site:
    >
    > http://ageless-athletes.com/perfect_gxp.shtml
    >
    > For the peanut gallery here's the studies that are cited


    I prefer to be called "the brass section".
     
  13. Jason Earl

    Jason Earl Guest

    DZ <[email protected]> writes:

    > Jason Earl <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> JRH wrote:
    >>> Graded Exercise Protocol (GXP) gives much the same benefits but with
    >>> a much reduced risk. See:
    >>>
    >>> http://www.fitnessprat.no/showthread.php?t=16088
    >>> http://www.mikementzer.com/stimulation.html

    >>
    >> OK, that makes sense. Before asking I did a bit of googling and the
    >> hits I turned up for GXP all centered around reaching a moderate level
    >> of fitness for health reasons (as opposed to performance reasons). I
    >> didn't find the article at fitnessprat, but I found a similar one on
    >> the Master Trainer site:
    >>
    >> http://ageless-athletes.com/perfect_gxp.shtml
    >>
    >> For the peanut gallery here's the studies that are cited

    >
    > I prefer to be called "the brass section".


    When I actually start quoting studies I am generally hoping that
    you'll chime in. I will make sure that I will use the term "the brass
    section" in the future.

    Jason
     
  14. JRH

    JRH Guest

    On Tue, 10 Jan 2006 00:11:24 -0700, Jason Earl <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >JRH <[email protected]> writes:
    >
    >> On Mon, 09 Jan 2006 15:47:02 -0700, Jason Earl <[email protected]>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>>JRH <[email protected]> writes:
    >>>
    >>>> On Mon, 09 Jan 2006 11:44:44 -0600, Hobbes <[email protected]>
    >>>> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>>In article <[email protected]>,
    >>>>> [email protected] wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> Would this workout be good for HIIT?
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Wake up at 5:30 AM, stretch, warm-up walking for 2-3
    >>>>>> minutes, then sprint for a minute (making sure I'm out of
    >>>>>> breath), walk for a minute and a half, and repeat until the
    >>>>>> timer gets to 15. Then walk for 5 minutes at a slow pace, get
    >>>>>> off the treadmill, and wait an hour to eat breakfast and then go
    >>>>>> to school.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>2 intervals isn't very much.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Do a google search for "Tabata Interval" for a more scientific
    >>>>>approach.
    >>>>
    >>>> It is considered that the Graded Exercise Protocol (GXP) can be
    >>>> just as effective as Tabata, without the inherent health/heart
    >>>> risks for the average person with limited time available.
    >>>
    >>>Where can I get more info on GXP? Personally, I don't see Tabata
    >>>sprints as being much more dangerous than a rousing game of soccer,
    >>>and I really like how Tabata-style drills make me feel (after I
    >>>recover), but I am certainly interested in hearing more about
    >>>something that is still effective without being as murderously
    >>>intense.

    >>
    >> If you are wanting CV and VO2 Max benefits without losing LBM, then
    >> Tabata is effective, but there is a risk of heart failure if you are
    >> not already suitably conditioned - and even if you are given the
    >> levels to which you may aspire or achieve.
    >>
    >> Graded Exercise Protocol (GXP) gives much the same benefits but with
    >> a much reduced risk. See:
    >>
    >> http://www.fitnessprat.no/showthread.php?t=16088
    >>
    >> http://www.mikementzer.com/stimulation.html
    >>
    >> HTH.

    >
    >OK, that makes sense. Before asking I did a bit of googling and the
    >hits I turned up for GXP all centered around reaching a moderate level
    >of fitness for health reasons (as opposed to performance reasons). I
    >didn't find the article at fitnessprat, but I found a similar one on
    >the Master Trainer site:
    >
    >http://ageless-athletes.com/perfect_gxp.shtml
    >
    >For the peanut gallery here's the studies that are cited:
    >
    > Chong, D.L., Blair, S.N., Jackson, A.S. Cardiorespiratory fitness,
    > body composition, and all-cause and cardiovascular disease
    > mortality in men. Am J Clin. Nutr.1999; 69: 373-380.
    >
    > Wei, M., Gibbons, L.W., Mitchell, T.L., Kampert, J.B., Chong,
    > D.L., Blair, S.N. The association between cardiorespiratory
    > fitness and impaired fasting glucose and Type 2 diabetes mellitus
    > in men. Ann Intern Med. 1999; 130: 89-96.
    >
    > Manson, J.E., Hu, F.B., Rich-Edwards, J.W., Colditz, G.A.,
    > Stampfer, M.J., Willett, W.C., Speizer, F.E., Hennekens, C.H. A
    > prospective study of walking as compared with vigorous exercise in
    > the prevention of coronary heart disease in women. N Engl. J
    > Med. 1999; 341: 650-658.
    >
    >Basically the idea is that there is a certain amount of fitness that
    >provides a huge health benefit. This health benefit is was found to
    >be even more important than body composition in determining health
    >risks such as heart failure or diabetes. To quote the article:
    >
    > Certainly, the minimum level of protection that frankly brings the
    > biggest bang for the buck (the biggest benefit is going from unfit
    > to modestly fit) is reachable by the vast majority of people
    > without much effort.
    >
    >The Winett article on Mike Mentzer's site was more interesting, as it
    >applied these same ideas to strength athletes and not to sedentary
    >folks. The basic premise was that GXP allows you to reach your
    >aerobic "genetic limitation" easily and without adding undue stress to
    >your system. Here's a quote:
    >
    > We could also use the special Tabata interval protocol 2 to 3
    > times per week to reach the same fitness goal. We could do the
    > same graded warm-up as in the GXP and GXT. Then we could do 6
    > full-blast 20 second sprints with only 10 seconds rest between
    > each. We would be sure, as called for by the protocol, that our
    > subject reached a point of absolute exhaustion at the end of the
    > sixth repeat.
    >
    > The Tabata protocol can be even more devastating metabolically
    > and skeletally than the GXT. This is because you need to go to
    > complete exhaustion and because of the fast pace of the sprints.
    >
    > So, it isn't clear in the long run if the interval protocol would
    > produce any better results than the GXP and over time, it too may
    > be worse.
    >
    >Personally, I have my doubts. I certainly didn't read any study that
    >came close to suggesting that GXP would be better at raising VO2 max
    >over time than Tabata interval drills (as the Winett article
    >suggests), and I am not interested in getting "fit enough." I want to
    >be a super hero. If I am going to go through the trouble of training,
    >I don't want to simply be "healthier than the average sedentary male."
    >I am not overly concerned that the Tabata drills are going to kill me.
    >I'm only 34, with no history of heart problems. I should be able to
    >run up and down the block a few times without keeling over.
    >
    >Thanks for the info though, it might be useful if I ever get to the
    >point where I am simply maintaining myself, or if I ever decide to
    >concentrate even more on pure weight training. I can certainly see
    >where GXP would fit in if you were only interested in limit strength,
    >power, or aesthetics.
    >


    I agree with your summation and I too would not use Tabata or GXP as
    they do not fulfil for me what I call a 'traditional' and challenging
    general workout. Like yourself I have always needed to be involved in
    something a great deal more demanding which is structured and sport
    specific. I do like, and always incorporate, interval training.

    However, in a group that involves some people who are anti CV type
    exercise because of the inherent risk of losing LBM, then it is
    inevitable that Tabata would be considered as an alternative. I would
    always advise those considering using the Tabata method to consider
    their personal suitability for such a regime, and consider GXP as a
    more suitable alternative.

    The benefits to those people of a more sedentary lifestyle are perhaps
    obvious, where much can be achieved in a relatively short space of
    time.
     
  15. On 2006-01-09, Dally <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Depending on your conditioning, this might mean you jog at 4.0 mph for 5
    > minutes, then sprint at 7.0 mph, then walk at 3.0 for 30 seconds, ramp
    > it back up to 4.0 as soon as possible, and then go up to 5.5 before you
    > hit 7.0 again.


    Please don't use 7.0mph and "sprint" in the same sentence (unless 7.0 refers
    to a recovery plod in between sprints!) Even you can "sprint" faster than
    that (I hope!).

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi
    http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  16. On 2006-01-08, [email protected] <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Would this workout be good for HIIT?
    >
    >
    > Wake up at 5:30 AM, stretch, warm-up walking for 2-3 minutes, then
    > sprint for a minute (making sure I'm out of breath), walk for a minute


    If you can do it for a minute, it's not a sprint. In fact, if it's within
    what the treadmill is capable of, it's probably not a sprint.

    It's not a bad workout (total of 6 reps, right ?) but I'd suggest something
    besides running (elliptical for example) to reduce your injury risk.

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi
    http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  17. On 2006-01-09, Hobbes <[email protected]> wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > [email protected] wrote:
    >
    >> Would this workout be good for HIIT?
    >>
    >>
    >> Wake up at 5:30 AM, stretch, warm-up walking for 2-3 minutes, then
    >> sprint for a minute (making sure I'm out of breath), walk for a minute
    >> and a half, and repeat until the timer gets to 15. Then walk for 5
    >> minutes at a slow pace, get off the treadmill, and wait an hour to eat
    >> breakfast and then go to school.
    >>

    >
    > 2 intervals isn't very much.
    >
    > Do a google search for "Tabata Interval" for a more scientific approach.


    Seems to me that he's doing 1 minute on, 1.5 off for 15 minutes -- so that's
    15/2.5 = 6, right ? That would seem about right to me -- if he does much more
    than 6, intensity begins to suffers (we only do 6-7 x60-90s for an anaerobic
    hill workout, for example, because they all need to be fast).

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi
    http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  18. On 2006-01-09, Jason Earl <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Where can I get more info on GXP? Personally, I don't see Tabata
    > sprints as being much more dangerous than a rousing game of soccer,


    One of the main differences is that if you're playing that rousing game
    of soccer, you have a fairly solid base of "soccer running". Most of the
    people who start doing these interval workouts are coming from doing
    absolutely no running.

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi
    http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  19. Hugh Beyer

    Hugh Beyer Guest

    Hobbes <[email protected]> wrote in news:khobman800-33923C.11444409012006
    @sn-ip.vsrv-sjc.supernews.net:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > [email protected] wrote:
    >
    >> Would this workout be good for HIIT?
    >>
    >>
    >> Wake up at 5:30 AM, stretch, warm-up walking for 2-3 minutes, then
    >> sprint for a minute (making sure I'm out of breath), walk for a minute
    >> and a half, and repeat until the timer gets to 15. Then walk for 5
    >> minutes at a slow pace, get off the treadmill, and wait an hour to eat
    >> breakfast and then go to school.
    >>

    >
    > 2 intervals isn't very much.
    >
    > Do a google search for "Tabata Interval" for a more scientific approach.
    >


    More than two intervals, yes? Surely 6 or so with warm-up and cool-down not
    included in the 15 minutes?

    Tabatas are fun. Try them. So are other forms of speed play--intervals,
    pyramids, hills. Fool with it.

    Hugh



    --
    Exercise is a dirty word. Whenever I hear it, I wash my mouth out with
    chocolate. ("Ladi")
     
  20. Hobbes

    Hobbes Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Donovan Rebbechi <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On 2006-01-09, Hobbes <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > In article <[email protected]>,
    > > [email protected] wrote:
    > >
    > >> Would this workout be good for HIIT?
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> Wake up at 5:30 AM, stretch, warm-up walking for 2-3 minutes, then
    > >> sprint for a minute (making sure I'm out of breath), walk for a minute
    > >> and a half, and repeat until the timer gets to 15. Then walk for 5
    > >> minutes at a slow pace, get off the treadmill, and wait an hour to eat
    > >> breakfast and then go to school.
    > >>

    > >
    > > 2 intervals isn't very much.
    > >
    > > Do a google search for "Tabata Interval" for a more scientific approach.

    >
    > Seems to me that he's doing 1 minute on, 1.5 off for 15 minutes -- so that's
    > 15/2.5 = 6, right ? That would seem about right to me -- if he does much more
    > than 6, intensity begins to suffers (we only do 6-7 x60-90s for an anaerobic
    > hill workout, for example, because they all need to be fast).


    I misread that. You are right - that is a pretty good aerobic 'power'
    program.

    --
    Keith
     
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