hill walking

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Kim, Mar 1, 2004.

  1. Kim

    Kim Guest

    What equipment will i require
     
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  2. On 1 Mar 2004 05:40:52 -0800, kim <[email protected]> wrote:

    > What equipment will i require

    You'll need a notabike for sure.

    Colin
    --
     
  3. Arthur Clune

    Arthur Clune Guest

    Colin Blackburn <[email protected]> wrote:
    : On 1 Mar 2004 05:40:52 -0800, kim <[email protected]> wrote:

    :> What equipment will i require

    : You'll need a notabike for sure.

    A hill is probably useful as well.

    Arthur

    --
    Arthur Clune http://www.clune.org "Technolibertarians make a philosophy out of a personality defect"
    - Paulina Borsook
     
  4. McBain_v1

    McBain_v1 New Member

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    Erm, strange one for a cycling forum, but here goes...

    * Decent warm clothing
    * Walking Boots (best with a Gore-Tex liner to keep your feet dry)
    * Socks (Bridgedale are good)
    * Rucksack (about 10litre capacity should be enough)

    Unless you've got some knee problems I would strongly advise against the purchase of those daft "ski-poles" that I've seen some walkers with. If you stumble, you don't want to be flapping around with poles in either hand, you want to be able to get your arms out in front of you!

    Let someone know what route you are taking and how long you expect it to take you, just in case.
     
  5. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    Arthur Clune posted ...

    > Colin Blackburn <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> On 1 Mar 2004 05:40:52 -0800, kim <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>> What equipment will i require
    >
    >> You'll need a notabike for sure.
    >
    > A hill is probably useful as well.

    A lot would depemd on what you define as 'A hill' .. I mean, technically, Everest could be described
    as 'a hill'. Albeit a pretty bloody big hill, but a hill nonetheless.

    --
    Paul

    (8(|) Homer rocks .. ;)
     
  6. Arthur Clune

    Arthur Clune Guest

    A lot would depemd on what you define as 'A hill' .. I mean, technically,
    : Everest could be described as 'a hill'. Albeit a pretty bloody big hill, but a hill nonetheless.

    Well, I've heard everest described as "high altitude hill-walking". K2 on the other hand, is a
    mountain...

    --
    Arthur Clune http://www.clune.org "Technolibertarians make a philosophy out of a personality defect"
    - Paulina Borsook
     
  7. trembler50

    trembler50 New Member

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    The "Daft Ski Poles" are actually jolly useful, especially down hill.
     
  8. robbiew

    robbiew New Member

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    For authentic Hillwalking the thermal socks have to be red. Any other colour will make you stand out from the crowd.
     
  9. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    "McBain_v1" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:GPH0c.2074$%[email protected]...

    > * Walking Boots (best with a Gore-Tex liner to keep your feet dry)

    Eh? do decent leather boots have one of these?

    More importantly, can you get either with SPD fittings?

    Hooray for the cold - it converted a lot of the ground which would normally have been hill walking
    (squelch, splat, sink, which we normally try to avoid) into hill riding, which was nice. But why do
    motorbikes ride and churn up what would otherwise be perfectly good bridleways?

    cheers, clive
     
  10. On 1 Mar 2004 05:40:52 -0800, in
    <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (kim) wrote:

    >What equipment will i require

    For the weekend trip I've just done from Wellington, Shropshire, to Coalport via Wrekin, Little
    Wenlock, and Coalbrookdale I took the folowing:

    Boots (not goretex), socks, w/proof trousers (not needed), wicking base layer, fleece, windproof-
    breathable shell, buff (amazingly useful) [1], food, flask of coffee, first aid kit, OS 1:50000 map,
    decent gloves.

    I also took a change of clothes for going to the pub in the evening, and a took a friend wit me.

    Coalport YHA is modern but cosy.

    Love and hugs from Rich x

    [1] The buff that set the world record for getting lost in less than 24 hours following its
    purchase, also set the world record for being the found in less than 12 hours after the purchase
    of its replacement. Black buffs and black cycling shorts look alike when nesting in a drawer.

    --
    DISCLAIMER: My email box is private property.Email which appears in my inbox is mine to do what I
    like with. Anything which is sent to me (whether intended or not) may, if I so desire, form a legal
    and binding contract.
     
  11. Ben

    Ben Guest

    On Mon, 1 Mar 2004 15:05:20 -0000, "Clive George"

    >"McBain_v1" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:GPH0c.2074$%[email protected]...
    >
    >> * Walking Boots (best with a Gore-Tex liner to keep your feet dry)
    >
    >Eh? do decent leather boots have one of these?
    >
    >More importantly, can you get either with SPD fittings?
    >
    >Hooray for the cold - it converted a lot of the ground which would normally have been hill walking
    >(squelch, splat, sink, which we normally try to avoid) into hill riding, which was nice. But why do
    >motorbikes ride and churn up what would otherwise be perfectly good bridleways?

    Dunno about motorbikes, but I've found horses churn up perfectly good bridleways pretty well.

    The ones I rode at the weekend had nice 6 inch deep hoof prints in soft mud for a few miles.
     
  12. kim wrote:
    > What equipment will i require

    One pair of legs, preferably sturdy.
     
  13. On Mon, 01 Mar 2004 16:10:56 +0000, in
    <[email protected]>, Ben <[email protected]>
    wrote:
    >>Hooray for the cold - it converted a lot of the ground which would normally have been hill walking
    >>(squelch, splat, sink, which we normally try to avoid) into hill riding, which was nice. But why
    >>do motorbikes ride and churn up what would otherwise be perfectly good bridleways?
    >
    >Dunno about motorbikes, but I've found horses churn up perfectly good bridleways pretty well.
    >
    >The ones I rode at the weekend had nice 6 inch deep hoof prints in soft mud for a few miles.

    Farming Today this morning has something about this ...

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio/aod/radio4_aod.shtml?farmingtoday
    --
    DISCLAIMER: My email box is private property.Email which appears in my inbox is mine to do what I
    like with. Anything which is sent to me (whether intended or not) may, if I so desire, form a legal
    and binding contract.
     
  14. >Farming Today this morning has something about this ...
    >
    >http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio/aod/radio4_aod.shtml?farmingtoday

    Oops, I've linked to the BBC website <hangs head in shame> ;-)

    --
    DISCLAIMER: My email box is private property.Email which appears in my inbox is mine to do what I
    like with. Anything which is sent to me (whether intended or not) may, if I so desire, form a legal
    and binding contract.
     
  15. > Eh? do decent leather boots have one of these?

    Decent well maintained leather ones won't need 'em. On the other hand you need to maintain them -
    polishing, dubbing - if you wan't to stand around in water. The main advantage of Gortex over
    leather is that it doesn't need taking care of.
     
  16. Ben

    Ben Guest

    On Mon, 01 Mar 2004 16:35:18 +0000, Richard Bates
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Mon, 01 Mar 2004 16:10:56 +0000, in <[email protected]>, Ben
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>Hooray for the cold - it converted a lot of the ground which would normally have been hill
    >>>walking (squelch, splat, sink, which we normally try to avoid) into hill riding, which was nice.
    >>>But why do motorbikes ride and churn up what would otherwise be perfectly good bridleways?
    >>
    >>Dunno about motorbikes, but I've found horses churn up perfectly good bridleways pretty well.
    >>
    >>The ones I rode at the weekend had nice 6 inch deep hoof prints in soft mud for a few miles.
    >
    >Farming Today this morning has something about this ...
    >
    >http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio/aod/radio4_aod.shtml?farmingtoday

    Interesting report and nicely balanced.

    I think the main thing to take away from the whole motorcycle/mtb/horse/walker/4wd thing is that
    everyone should make sure that they don't damage the trail or they repair any damage they
    do.

    Unfortunately nobody does.
     
  17. Adrian

    Adrian Guest

    Ben ([email protected]) gurgled happily, sounding much like they were
    saying :

    > I think the main thing to take away from the whole motorcycle/mtb/horse/walker/4wd thing is that
    > everyone should make sure that they don't damage the trail or they repair any damage they
    > do.
    >
    > Unfortunately nobody does.

    Most responsible 4wd clubs organise lane maintenance days regularly.

    By definition, though, any 4wd or motorbike on a bridleway is not responsible, since they shouldn't
    be there in the first place...
     
  18. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    "Adrian" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Ben ([email protected]) gurgled happily, sounding much like they were saying :
    >
    > > I think the main thing to take away from the whole motorcycle/mtb/horse/walker/4wd thing is that
    > > everyone should make sure that they don't damage the trail or they repair any damage they
    > > do.
    > >
    > > Unfortunately nobody does.
    >
    > Most responsible 4wd clubs organise lane maintenance days regularly.
    >
    > By definition, though, any 4wd or motorbike on a bridleway is not responsible, since they
    > shouldn't be there in the first place...

    Mmm. Look at virtually any bridleway in the three peaks area and spot the motorbike erosion.
    Sometimes it does _really_ annoy me. Are there any 'responsible' off road motorcyclists?

    (yes, it's motorbikes rather than 4wds that are the main problem round here
    IMO)

    cheers, clive
     
  19. BenS

    BenS Guest

    On 1 Mar 2004 17:42:34 GMT, Adrian <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Ben ([email protected]) gurgled happily, sounding much like they were saying :
    >
    >> I think the main thing to take away from the whole motorcycle/mtb/horse/walker/4wd thing is that
    >> everyone should make sure that they don't damage the trail or they repair any damage they
    >> do.
    >>
    >> Unfortunately nobody does.
    >
    >Most responsible 4wd clubs organise lane maintenance days regularly.
    >
    >By definition, though, any 4wd or motorbike on a bridleway is not responsible, since they shouldn't
    >be there in the first place...

    This is true. There will always be those who don't give a shit about the damage they cause or where
    they ride/drive. Problem is that they're more noticeable when they're on mx bikes or 4wds.
    --
    "We take these risks, not to escape from life, but to prevent life escaping from us."
    http://www.bensales.com
     
  20. BenS

    BenS Guest

    On Mon, 1 Mar 2004 18:32:56 -0000, "Clive George"

    >"Adrian" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]...
    >> Ben ([email protected]) gurgled happily, sounding much like they were saying :
    >>
    >> > I think the main thing to take away from the whole motorcycle/mtb/horse/walker/4wd thing is
    >> > that everyone should make sure that they don't damage the trail or they repair any damage they
    >> > do.
    >> >
    >> > Unfortunately nobody does.
    >>
    >> Most responsible 4wd clubs organise lane maintenance days regularly.
    >>
    >> By definition, though, any 4wd or motorbike on a bridleway is not responsible, since they
    >> shouldn't be there in the first place...
    >
    >Mmm. Look at virtually any bridleway in the three peaks area and spot the motorbike erosion.
    > Sometimes it does _really_ annoy me. Are there any 'responsible' off road motorcyclists?

    Yes, there are, but just like decent drivers you never notice them.

    With any group you only ever notice the bad members.
    --
    "We take these risks, not to escape from life, but to prevent life escaping from us."
    http://www.bensales.com
     
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