Hip Flexor Trouble

Discussion in 'Cycling Training' started by wiredued, Jun 17, 2006.

  1. wiredued

    wiredued New Member

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    Last year my Dad bought a carbon bike he test rode it and hurt his hip flexor but still thought it was a great bike:confused: and bought it anyway. He still has a nagging hip flexor on his left side and after our first ride this year back in late April he iced it up and has not been riding more than 10 miles at a time since then because of it. I am suspiciuos of his bike could there be a problem like a double threaded crooked pedal or something like that? Should he try his old aluminum frame bike to see if the problem gets better? Could he be allergic to carbon?
     
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  2. tanggoman

    tanggoman New Member

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    Check the saddle height.
     
  3. netscriber

    netscriber New Member

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    Or buy a titanium hip flexor :D for him on fathers day.
     
  4. Deest

    Deest New Member

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    Do you suspect it's too high or too low?
     
  5. Sillyoldtwit

    Sillyoldtwit New Member

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    You can check the saddle height by putting the bike on a trainer and warming up the muscles for 5 mins or so. Then take off your shoes and put your heels on the pedals. Pedal slowly noting the position of your knee bend at the bottom of the stroke. If your pop has got the saddle height right, the knees should be fully extended at the bottom of the stroke. The heels should feel like they're going to lose contact with the pedals at the bottom, but they should just hang on.
    The pelvis should stay level throughout and there should definitely be no hip rocking. Obviously, adjust the saddle height accordingly.
    When he puts his shoes back on, the amount of knee bend should be just about right.

    P.S. If he has raised heels on his shoes, do the above using the instep of the foot, not the heel.

    This is not a pefect method but should help. TYSON
     
  6. wiredued

    wiredued New Member

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    Just to update a specialist told him he thinks it's siatica and he should raise his handle bars. The LBS fitter (who has given me good advice on fit in the past without making a dime off me) is trying to make it work but thinks he should have never bought the bike and wants to sell him another bike like all good salesmen do.
     
  7. netscriber

    netscriber New Member

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    Geez!! Sciatica? And the LBS knows he has sciatica?
    http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/fact/thr_report.cfm?Thread_ID=167&topcategory=Spine
    I seriously doubt an LBS can see a bulging disc without an MRI!! :eek: Dude, he needs a new LBS.

    And the "bike is not right" advice is pure BS, unless...
    a. The bike is ~4-5" too small or too big or
    b. He needed a racing road bike and it is a girls cruiser

    If the frame is within 2-3" of what he needs the rest of the adjustments can be made using...
    a. The correct handlebar
    b. The correct size stem
    c. The correct seatpost with the right offset
    d. The correct saddle height
    e. The correct crank length

    The above interfaces provide a huge variability in fitting.

    Since your problem can arise due to many different things, mainly...
    a. Hip flexors or hamstrings being too stiff
    b. Using an incorrectly fitted bike
    c. Using a frame too outrageously small or big(again wrong size)

    I recommend the following...
    1. Make sure your dad stretches the hip flexor and hamstring
    http://www.exrx.net/Stretches/HipFlexors/KneelingHipFlexor.html
    http://www.exrx.net/Stretches/Hamstrings/Seated.html

    2. Buy your dad a bike fitting session and make sure the fitting is within a reasonable range

    3. And if after adjustments and proper flexibility it still hurts, make him go see a doctor or a chiropractor.
     
  8. wiredued

    wiredued New Member

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    No the specialist that said it was sciatica and that he should raise his handle bars was a sports medicine doctor of some kind. The LBS guy is only an expert at fitting bikes to people thats all. This guy sells mostly Cannondales and wasn't involved when the Trek Madone was purchased. I have my doubts about the handlbar hieght causing sciatica but thats what he is trying to see if it helps he doesn't want to give up the bike
     
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