Hip pain & cycling

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Doki, Apr 15, 2006.

  1. Doki

    Doki Guest

    Anyone had this? Lately I've had bad pains in my right hip, which isn't
    great in your early 20s. Bad enough to make putting socks on difficult in
    the morning, and make walking bloody painful on occasion. My GP reckons lots
    of cyclists get it, but I put it down to having a naff chair at my desk as
    I'd not been cycling at the time.

    OTOH, I had a quick go on a stepping machine and my right leg does seem a
    lot stronger than my left, so I could be working it harder. Current plan is
    to go and see the sport physio at uni. My riding is about 70% MTB and 30%
    Road bike.
     
    Tags:


  2. John

    John Guest

    "Doki" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Anyone had this? Lately I've had bad pains in my right hip, which isn't
    > great in your early 20s. Bad enough to make putting socks on difficult in
    > the morning, and make walking bloody painful on occasion. My GP reckons
    > lots of cyclists get it, but I put it down to having a naff chair at my
    > desk as I'd not been cycling at the time.
    >
    > OTOH, I had a quick go on a stepping machine and my right leg does seem a
    > lot stronger than my left, so I could be working it harder. Current plan
    > is to go and see the sport physio at uni. My riding is about 70% MTB and
    > 30% Road bike.


    Wow an almost helpful doctor.

    Sport physio is the answer.

    Cyling can cause some leg muscles to become overly tight which causes
    problems with hips and knees. You probably need to do some stretches.
     
  3. wafflycat

    wafflycat Guest

    "Doki" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Anyone had this? Lately I've had bad pains in my right hip, which isn't
    > great in your early 20s. Bad enough to make putting socks on difficult in
    > the morning, and make walking bloody painful on occasion. My GP reckons
    > lots of cyclists get it, but I put it down to having a naff chair at my
    > desk as I'd not been cycling at the time.
    >
    > OTOH, I had a quick go on a stepping machine and my right leg does seem a
    > lot stronger than my left, so I could be working it harder. Current plan
    > is to go and see the sport physio at uni. My riding is about 70% MTB and
    > 30% Road bike.
    >


    Need your saddle adjusted? If it's too high you can end up rocking your
    hips. Get thee to a sports' physio and be seen to!

    Cheers, helen s
     
  4. Some 'hip pain' can originate from discs and vertebrae in the back.

    Make sure your back gets checked properly.

    --
    Helen D. Vecht: [email protected]
    Edgware.
     
  5. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, Doki
    ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > Anyone had this? Lately I've had bad pains in my right hip, which isn't
    > great in your early 20s.


    I first got into serious cycling because, at age twenty, I had quite bad
    arthritis in hips and knees. Regular cycling improved it very quickly,
    and after thirty years of regular cycling I still have no pain in
    either. Apart from falls I've never had cycling /cause/ joint pain -
    quite the opposite. Cycling is non-impact and polishes joints - it
    shouldn't cause pain.

    > Bad enough to make putting socks on difficult
    > in the morning, and make walking bloody painful on occasion. My GP
    > reckons lots of cyclists get it, but I put it down to having a naff
    > chair at my desk as I'd not been cycling at the time.


    Sounds quite likely.

    > OTOH, I had a quick go on a stepping machine and my right leg does seem
    > a lot stronger than my left, so I could be working it harder. Current
    > plan is to go and see the sport physio at uni. My riding is about 70%
    > MTB and 30% Road bike.


    A friend of mine has a very posh Polar HRM device which includes a device
    which measures tension in the upper run of the chain and, consequently,
    instantaneous power. Consequently it can show left/right leg
    discrepancies as you cycle.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    ;; Diplomacy, American: see Intelligence, Military
     
  6. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Doki wrote:
    > Anyone had this? Lately I've had bad pains in my right hip, which
    > isn't great in your early 20s. Bad enough to make putting socks on
    > difficult in the morning, and make walking bloody painful on
    > occasion. My GP reckons lots of cyclists get it, but I put it down to
    > having a naff chair at my desk as I'd not been cycling at the time.


    I don't know if they cause hip problems in the first place but *low*
    chairs don't help when you do have a hip problem. You're better off when
    knees are lower than hips, or at least level with.

    Conversely, when it comes to bike saddles, as Helen Waffly mentioned, too
    high is bad. Try lowering by a few mm if you suspect it might be too
    high. Even 3mm makes a difference. Too low isn't good either but I think
    it'd have to be gettiing on for BMX style before too low is worse than too
    high as far as the hips go.

    ~PB, ex broken hip
     
  7. Dave S

    Dave S Guest

    I had trouble with my right hip, diagnosed by a hospital specialist as
    arthritis. He said it would get worse and advised me to stop the high
    impact sports I enjoyed.
    I took a job that meant I would be on my feet most of the day and as it
    was only about 4 miles from my home I decided to cycle there.
    I wondered how my hip would hold up to this?

    After about 1 month of regular cycling the hip pain disappeared and
    hasn't come back as yet.
    About 14 months have gone by since then.

    I also went to an osteopath who thought the hip pain might be related
    to lower back pain rather than a worn out hip joint.
    I have also found stretching exercise helps both with the hips and
    back. The ones I used I learnt at a yoga class.

    Dave Shaw
     
  8. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, Dave
    S ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > I had trouble with my right hip, diagnosed by a hospital specialist as
    > arthritis. He said it would get worse and advised me to stop the high
    > impact sports I enjoyed.
    > I took a job that meant I would be on my feet most of the day and as it
    > was only about 4 miles from my home I decided to cycle there.
    > I wondered how my hip would hold up to this?
    >
    > After about 1 month of regular cycling the hip pain disappeared and
    > hasn't come back as yet.
    > About 14 months have gone by since then.


    I started serious cycling thirty years ago for exactly this reason (I
    cycled before, but it was the arthritis which made me decide to cycle
    much more). I haven't had _any_ trouble with arthritis in the last
    twenty-five years. I've presumably still got the medical condition,
    since it doesn't go away, but it doesn't trouble me any more. Cycling
    does an enormously good job of smooth polishing movements of your knee
    and hip joints (especially if you pedal at a higher RPM or 'cadence').

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    ;; making jokes about dyslexia isn't big, it isn't clever and
    ;; it isn't furry.
     
  9. gjt70

    gjt70 Guest

    Doki wrote:
    > Anyone had this? Lately I've had bad pains in my right hip, which isn't
    > great in your early 20s. Bad enough to make putting socks on difficult in
    > the morning, and make walking bloody painful on occasion. My GP reckons lots
    > of cyclists get it, but I put it down to having a naff chair at my desk as
    > I'd not been cycling at the time.
    >
    > OTOH, I had a quick go on a stepping machine and my right leg does seem a
    > lot stronger than my left, so I could be working it harder. Current plan is
    > to go and see the sport physio at uni. My riding is about 70% MTB and 30%
    > Road bike.
    >


    Over the last year I have increased my cycling miles significantly (now
    greater than 200 miles per week) and found that I started to get some
    hip pain and something like the symptoms you describe. Like you I
    became concerned about my hip joint etc etc.

    However, following some web searching I found the following:

    The most common cause of knee and hip pain in cyclists is iliotibial
    band (IT band) syndrome. The IT band is a thick fibrous band of tissue,
    which runs on the outside of the leg from the hip to the knee. Pain is
    caused when the band becomes tight and rubs over the bony prominences of
    the hip (greater trochanter) and/or the knee (lateral epicondyle).
    (http://www.roadcycling.com/training/kneepain.shtml)

    From this I identified some exercises to stretch the IT band. Easiest
    one is to lie on your back with one leg bent and the over flat on the
    floor. Put the foot of the bent leg onto the floor the other side of
    the flat leg then use your hand (the one corresponding to the flat leg)
    to pull your knee across your body and therefore stretching the IT band.

    I found that a couple of days of undertaking this exercise a few times
    and all the pain went away! Its a miracle! I understand that cycling
    weekly suggested a similar exercise a couple of weeks ago.

    Hope that makes some sense and helps!

    Gordon
     
Loading...
Loading...