Hit from behind by bike - whose fault is it?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Jack, May 26, 2003.

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  1. Jack

    Jack Guest

    I was riding my bike just past a narrow path with a friend, when the bicycle in front of me (my
    friend) suddenly stopped and I run into his bike and damaged my leg and his mudguard.

    Whose fault is it?

    My fault, for riding too close to him (I was chatting to him) or his, for stopping suddenly
    without warning.

    Thank you
     
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  2. Grl

    Grl Guest

    Ever hear the term "equal negligence"?

    --

    - GRL

    "It's good to want things."

    Steve Barr (philosopher, poet, humorist, chemist, Visual Basic programmer)
    "Jack" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > I was riding my bike just past a narrow path with a friend, when the
    bicycle
    > in front of me (my friend) suddenly stopped and I run into his bike and damaged my leg and his
    > mudguard.
    >
    > Whose fault is it?
    >
    > My fault, for riding too close to him (I was chatting to him) or his, for stopping suddenly
    > without warning.
    >
    > Thank you
     
  3. Jack

    Jack Guest

    So you say "both are equaly at fault" So each one can claim "negligence" from the other Thanks

    "GRL> wrote in message .
    > Ever hear the term "equal negligence"?
    >
    > --
    >
    > - GRL
    >
    > "Jack" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > I was riding my bike just past a narrow path with a friend, when the
    > bicycle
    > > in front of me (my friend) suddenly stopped and I run into his bike and damaged my leg and his
    > > mudguard.
    > >
    > > Whose fault is it?
    > >
    > > My fault, for riding too close to him (I was chatting to him) or his, for stopping suddenly
    > > without warning.
    > >
    > > Thank you
    > >
    > >
    >
     
  4. Kev C

    Kev C Guest

    Jack typed the following

    > So you say "both are equaly at fault" So each one can claim "negligence" from the other Thanks
    >
    > "GRL> wrote in message .
    >> Ever hear the term "equal negligence"?
    <snip>

    Maybe it's because I am not American, but why "claim" at all? (Can only think there was a lot of
    damage ,that the respective insurance companys are going to pay for).

    --
    yours K (Addy not usable [not that you would try it anyway]) There wis a Hare ran tae a burn it ran
    sae fast it couldnae turn \\SPLASH// :eek:) [Please note grammar and descriptions are loose so no
    flaming me please]
     
  5. Hunrobe

    Hunrobe Guest

    >"Jack" [email protected]

    wrote:

    >
    >I was riding my bike just past a narrow path with a friend, when the bicycle in front of me (my
    >friend) suddenly stopped and I run into his bike and damaged my leg and his mudguard.
    >
    >Whose fault is it?
    >
    >My fault, for riding too close to him (I was chatting to him) or his, for stopping suddenly
    >without warning.

    That you were chatting isn't an excuse. It's a contributory cause. The collision was your fault.
    Whether it's a bike or a car, the primary responsibility for avoiding rear end collisions is on the
    operator of the rearmost vehicle. I'm curious- why do you ask? I'd hope that you aren't arguing over
    who should pay for the damaged mudguard or any medical bills. Little scrapes like you describe
    happen. IMO it's best just to learn from them and move on.

    Regards, Bob Hunt
     
  6. On Mon, 26 May 2003 10:36:44 +0000 (UTC), "Jack" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >I was riding my bike just past a narrow path with a friend, when the bicycle in front of me (my
    >friend) suddenly stopped and I run into his bike and damaged my leg and his mudguard.
    >
    >Whose fault is it?

    Yours.

    Barry
     
  7. Gregr

    Gregr Guest

    On Mon, 26 May 2003 10:36:44 +0000 (UTC), "Jack" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >My fault, for riding too close to him (I was chatting to him) or his, for stopping suddenly
    >without warning.
    >

    Neither,

    Its his bicycle manufacturers fault for having brakes that work too good, and your bicycle
    manufacturers fault for having brakes that suck.

    Also consider the state/village/dept who owns/manages the bike path. And the builder of the
    path also.

    G
     
  8. Jack

    Jack Guest

    "Hunrobe"
    > Whether it's a bike or a car, the primary responsibility for avoiding rear end collisions is on
    > the operator of the rearmost vehicle.

    Are you saying that the "rearmost vehicle" is always at fault ...even if the front vehicle had no
    stop lights?

    Thanks
     
  9. On Mon, 26 May 2003 14:03:33 +0000 (UTC), "Jack" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >"Hunrobe"
    >> Whether it's a bike or a car, the primary responsibility for avoiding rear end collisions is on
    >> the operator of the rearmost vehicle.
    >
    >Are you saying that the "rearmost vehicle" is always at fault ...even if the front vehicle had no
    >stop lights?
    >
    >Thanks

    In many states, this is true for motor vehicles.

    Barry
     
  10. On Mon, 26 May 2003 10:36:44 +0000, Jack wrote:

    >
    > I was riding my bike just past a narrow path with a friend, when the bicycle in front of me (my
    > friend) suddenly stopped and I run into his bike and damaged my leg and his mudguard.
    >
    > Whose fault is it?
    >
    > My fault, for riding too close to him (I was chatting to him) or his, for stopping suddenly
    > without warning.

    Choice #1. You ran into him. You are supposed to be able to control your bike well enough to not run
    into things in front of you.

    Things can happen at the front of the line that you can't see, but the rider in front can. It is up
    to you to avoid hitting him. This applies whether or not you were in a paceline (which is dumb on a
    narrow trail). You need to have an escape route if the rider in front suddenly stops.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | And though I have the gift of prophecy, and understand all _`\(,_ | mysteries, and all
    knowledge; and though I have all faith, so (_)/ (_) | that I could remove mountains, and have not
    charity, I am nothing. [1 Corinth. 13:2]
     
  11. Jack

    Jack Guest

    I thank you all I'm enlightened!

    J
     
  12. Alex Colvin

    Alex Colvin Guest

    >>Are you saying that the "rearmost vehicle" is always at fault ...even if the front vehicle had no
    >>stop lights?

    >If you're talking about traffic codes the short answer is yes. If the front

    Bicycling is full of scratches and scrapes and flats and breakdowns. Most of them aren't really
    "fault". If it wasn't too serious, just try to avoid it in the future.

    --
    mac the naïf
     
  13. Waxxer

    Waxxer Guest

    I am a little puzzled as to why you ask this question. All the preceding responses are correct. The
    difference is your not on the road. You are out having fun. For example, not too long ago on a
    really slippery down (motorcycling) I stopped hard to avoid a huge piece of granite rock. The guy
    behind me was on my ass (and that's OK because we were cooking). I slowed before he could get it
    under control. He hit my bike and knocked it completely out from under me. I was sitting on his
    front fender. He broke a radiator shroud and my rear fender was completely bent.

    We asked if each other if were OK, and that was the end of that. He IS STILL my by best
    riding buddy.

    ...and that is what is important.

    "Jack" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > I was riding my bike just past a narrow path with a friend, when the
    bicycle
    > in front of me (my friend) suddenly stopped and I run into his bike and damaged my leg and his
    > mudguard.
    >
    > Whose fault is it?
    >
    > My fault, for riding too close to him (I was chatting to him) or his, for stopping suddenly
    > without warning.
    >
    > Thank you
     
  14. "Jack" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I was riding my bike just past a narrow path with a friend, when the bicycle in front of me (my
    > friend) suddenly stopped and I run into his bike and damaged my leg and his mudguard.
    >

    Reminds me of a wake-up call I had last year. I was pacing a cyclist about 30 feet ahead of me at
    about 30 kph when he saw an attractive female cyclist sitting next to her bike by the side of the
    road. He panic stopped and I almost didn't manage to miss him. Memo to self: even with a large
    gap, it's important to be alert (to the cyclist panic stopping, not just the cause of his panic
    stop :) ).

    Then there was the time (same street, same speed) when I glanced over and noticed a double
    shadow. Pondering WHEN we had acquired that second sun, I tried to catch sight of the drafter in
    my peripheral vision, or hear his bike. To no avail. What a maroon. Not only is it rude to hide
    on someone's wheel without warning them, it's dangerous.
     
  15. Tezza

    Tezza New Member

    Joined:
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    Jack,
    You are a victim of your country's Hollywood Lawyer culture - strike a blow for the human race and take responsibility for your own safety. Say sorry and enjoy the rest of the ride with your friend:confused:
     
  16. Waxxer

    Waxxer Guest

    So true to the point! You will never know what will trigger a cyclist to slow down. It could be
    impending doom or beautiful scenery. Riding on the tail of others is risky and your
    responsibilility.

    "mark freedman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "Jack" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > I was riding my bike just past a narrow path with a friend, when the
    bicycle
    > > in front of me (my friend) suddenly stopped and I run into his bike and damaged my leg and his
    > > mudguard.
    > >
    >
    > Reminds me of a wake-up call I had last year. I was pacing a cyclist about 30 feet ahead of me
    > at about 30 kph when he saw an attractive female cyclist sitting next to her bike by the side
    > of the road. He panic stopped and I almost didn't manage to miss him. Memo to self: even with a
    > large gap, it's important to be alert (to the cyclist panic stopping, not just the cause of his
    > panic stop :) ).
    >
    > Then there was the time (same street, same speed) when I glanced over and noticed a double
    > shadow. Pondering WHEN we had acquired that second sun, I tried to catch sight of the drafter
    > in my peripheral vision, or hear his bike. To no avail. What a maroon. Not only is it rude to
    > hide on someone's wheel without warning them, it's dangerous.
     
  17. Mark Hickey

    Mark Hickey Guest

    [email protected] (mark freedman) wrote:

    > Reminds me of a wake-up call I had last year. I was pacing a cyclist about 30 feet ahead of me
    > at about 30 kph when he saw an attractive female cyclist sitting next to her bike by the side of
    > the road. He panic stopped and I almost didn't manage to miss him. Memo to self: even with a
    > large gap, it's important to be alert (to the cyclist panic stopping, not just the cause of his
    > panic stop :) ).

    It occurs to me that the above is a great incentive to do some braking practice (not that your
    story indicates poor technique). There are riders who know how to shift their butt back and stand
    the bike on its nose (figuratively, though sometimes literally), and others that are scared of the
    front brake. If the former are leading the latter in a paceline and Something Bad [tm] happens,
    carnage ensues.

    Mark Hickey Habanero Cycles http://www.habcycles.com Home of the $695 ti frame
     
  18. Derral

    Derral Guest

    I don't know who should be considered at fault, but it sounds like your friend should consider
    getting a new friend.

    "Jack" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > So you say "both are equaly at fault" So each one can claim "negligence" from the other Thanks
    >
    > "GRL> wrote in message .
    > > Ever hear the term "equal negligence"?
    > >
    > > --
    > >
    > > - GRL
    > >
    > > "Jack" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > >
    > > > I was riding my bike just past a narrow path with a friend, when the
    > > bicycle
    > > > in front of me (my friend) suddenly stopped and I run into his bike
    and
    > > > damaged my leg and his mudguard.
    > > >
    > > > Whose fault is it?
    > > >
    > > > My fault, for riding too close to him (I was chatting to him) or his, for stopping suddenly
    > > > without warning.
    > > >
    > > > Thank you
    > > >
    > > >
    > > >
    > >
    >
     
  19. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >I was riding my bike just past a narrow path with a friend, when the bicycle in front of me (my
    >friend) suddenly stopped and I run into his bike and damaged my leg and his mudguard. Whose fault
    >is it? My fault, for riding too close to him (I was chatting to him) or his, for stopping suddenly
    >without warning.

    Legally, your fault for tailgating.
    -----------------
    Alex __O _-\<,_ (_)/ (_)
     
  20. R15757

    R15757 Guest

    You probably "picked him up" when you passed him, thinking, I'm just going to blow by this guy. And
    he's thinking, Aha! Someone to draft on who thinks they're fast.

    Getting drafted can be annoying when you think you're fast, but it's part of cycling. And remember,
    two cyclists together is faster than one alone.
     
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