Hit serious hole and my casette now wobbles significantly.

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by slimer78, May 25, 2005.

  1. slimer78

    slimer78 New Member

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    I am just getting back into cycling after 7 or so years and am riding a late 70's Masi 3v. Recently I hit a serious hole and noticed that my casette now wobbles or floats when the wheel is spinning. Also if i spin the wheel with the bike off of the ground the crank now rotates slowly (never did this before). Did my fat ass damage the rear axle or is this due to the age of the components or something? Is it safe to still ride or does it need immediate attention? Thanks.
     
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  2. boudreaux

    boudreaux New Member

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    Bent axel. Dollars to donuts it's a freewheel not a cassette. Don't think they were making 3Vs in the late 70 either.
     
  3. PeterF

    PeterF New Member

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    Boudreaux is on the mark. I did the same thing and it was a bent axel. When the wheel was spinning in the truing stand you could hear the friction in one spot. The wheel still works, but I only use it on my oldest bike that's permanently mounted to the trainer. I think it may be time to invest in a new back wheel. You should be able to find a similar wheel on e-bay.
     
  4. boudreaux

    boudreaux New Member

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    Axels can be replaced.
     
  5. PeterF

    PeterF New Member

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    I'm assuming that if the wheels are the original ones from the late 70's it might be hard to find a replacement axel (although not impossible). In my case, if it happened to my Ksyriums, Open Pro's or Protons, I would have repaired them that day. It was a set of Shimano R540's that came with the bike. I didn't particularly care for them. Like I said, they work fine on the trainer which unfortunately is all the weather has allowed me to ride lately.
    :eek:
     
  6. slimer78

    slimer78 New Member

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    You are right about the bike not being from the late 70's, it says made in Italy but it seems that masi was building bikes in california when this one was made. I talked to my pop who originally bought the bike and he got it sometime in the 80's. The wheels are not original and do have sizable grooves in the rim from the breakpads I guess. If I were to replace the wheels what do i need to know to make sure they will work with the old components? Can I find new wheels that will work? I should probably do my homework on bike parts. Right now I only know about enough to make me dangerous. Thanks for the help.
     
  7. boudreaux

    boudreaux New Member

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    Make life easy. If that 3v has a 56.5 to 57.5cm TT sell it to me and get another bike...There is no way to answer the wheel replacement question without knowing exaclty what components are on the bike and if it is friction or index shifting. If it's friction and you plan on keeping it that way,replacement is alot easier....You don't have time to read the whole book on bike parts and all the gotchas and compatibility isssues,but Sheldon Brown has alot of it at www.harriscyclery.com The right kind of LBS could help you out,to too many are populated by nose pickers that would sell you a whole drivetrain or a new bike cuz they haven't read the book.
     
  8. slimer78

    slimer78 New Member

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    To be honest I have been thinking about selling it because it is a size 56 center to top and I should be riding a 53 or 54. I hate to let it go but I would not be able to afford a new bike that actually fits me until I sell this one. Trying to find a new italian made steel bike that I can afford seems a bit tricky.
     
  9. bikeguy2004

    bikeguy2004 New Member

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    LOL… If you think you are going to sell a 20 year old bike for enough money to help you buy a new bike, then you probably haven’t been to a bike shop in 20 years. You maybe able to pay for some of the sales tax….

    I’d suggest trying to find an axle for you bike, and ride around the next big hole.

    Masi still makes a steel bike…. http://www.masibikes.com/bikes.html

    From the Masi web site;
    The Masi 3VS Volumetrica developed and produced during the early 1980’s was way ahead of its time with innovative internal lugs and oversized tubing.
     
  10. boudreaux

    boudreaux New Member

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    You obviously don't have a clue what some old bikes sell for. ...The curent Masi are no relation to the old stuf,The name was sold and nearly all are now made in the orient.
     
  11. bikeguy2004

    bikeguy2004 New Member

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    OK… enlighten me…. how much would the bike be worth???
    --------
    I stopped at eBay....
    OK… so a 1970 frame is worth about $710 (at least that’s the bid now).

    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=98084&item=7158608303&rd=1&ssPageName=WDVW

    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=98084&item=7159199995&rd=1&ssPageName=WDVW

    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=98084&item=7159536896&rd=1&ssPageName=WDVW

    So yes I did learn something today….
     
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