holy contradictions batman

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by TC, Feb 23, 2006.

  1. TC

    TC Guest

    http://frenchfood.about.com/od/frenchdiethealth/fr/frenchwomdiet.htm

    French Women Don't Get Fat
    >From Debra F.Weber,

    Your Guide to French Cuisine.
    Review by Kathryn Morton

    Women on American low-carb diets like Atkins beware! This book uses
    common sense and lifestyle habits instead of avoidance to help us lose
    weight. No negative thoughts about the French here. It's refreshing
    to read Mrs. Guiliano's positive perspective of the joys of food and
    drink. She tells us that, as Americans, we need to "assess"
    ourselves personally instead of "following a diet."

    She lived it
    Guiliano has the advantage of having lived both in France, where she
    was born, and America, where she spends most of her time now as
    president and CEO of Clicquot, Inc. in New York. She is also director
    of the champagne house, Veuve Clicquot. Even though she comes from a
    privileged background (which she readily relates), she knows what
    she's talking about, having gained 20 pounds after spending a year as
    a young woman in America. Upon her return to France, her family was
    shocked at her "sack of potatoes" appearance. Fed up with her fat
    silhouette, she connected with family doctor, Dr. Miracle, who guided
    her back to her the pleasures of French eating habits. She gets our
    attention and the reader immediately respects her story.


    What's the Secret?
    What's the French secret? According to Guiliano, it's quality and
    pleasure, not avoidance and deprivation. "You owe it to your loved
    ones as well as yourself to know and pursue your pleasures," she
    tells us. We must take delight in life, and not give in to our
    oh-so-American way of quickly eating low quality food while reading or
    watching TV. We must "maximize the rewards of pleasure...of sensual
    awareness" and control the quality and quantity of the food and drink
    we consume. Fresh ingredients paired with slow, sensual eating and
    drinking is key. Forget about those American sodas filled with sugar,
    we all need to drink lots of water.

    Guiliano intersperses tried and true recipes, a little history of food
    (chocolate in particular) and family stories that give credence to her
    writing. Being a Francophile myself, I was thrilled to see snippets of
    French language and culture sprinkled throughout the book. For the
    reader who doesn't know French, she thoughtfully places the English
    translation after the French phrases.

    If you've tried the popular American Atkins diet (as I have), you
    know that it does not include moderation and it's just not healthy to
    continue eating all that fat. Moderation, balance, exercise, plenty of
    water, and very fresh ingredients are the reasons why French women
    don't get fat. Au revoir to over-indulgence and deprivation, bonjour
    la joie de vivre!

    *****************

    How many contradictions can you pick out in this ridiculously
    american-centric review?

    Hilarious!

    TC
     
    Tags:


  2. Enrico C

    Enrico C Guest

    > http://frenchfood.about.com/od/frenchdiethealth/fr/frenchwomdiet.htm

    > What's the Secret?

    [...]
    > it's quality and
    > pleasure, not avoidance and deprivation.


    Absolutely.

    > "You owe it to your loved
    > ones as well as yourself to know and pursue your pleasures," she
    > tells us. We must take delight in life, and not give in to our
    > oh-so-American way of quickly eating low quality food while reading or
    > watching TV. We must "maximize the rewards of pleasure...of sensual
    > awareness" and control the quality and quantity of the food and drink
    > we consume. Fresh ingredients paired with slow, sensual eating and
    > drinking is key.


    I couldn't agree more.

    > Forget about those American sodas filled with sugar,

    [...]

    Not just American, alas!
     
  3. montygram

    montygram Guest

    My diet consists of ice cream, cheese, butter, yogurt, coconut
    products, bread I make myself (no whole grains, hardly any fat
    content), fruit, dark chocolate, boiled eggs, and some minor
    constituents used for flavor, along with Celtic Sea salt. I am about
    5'9" tall and about 130 pounds (after recovering from the malabsorption
    of 2000-2001). All of the dairy is whole milk. Most of the food is
    organic. Everyone else in my family is "obese." The differences in
    diet are: they eat meat and they consume plenty of refined, highly
    unsaturated oils.
     
  4. montygram wrote:

    > I am about
    > 5'9" tall and about 130 pounds (after recovering from the malabsorption
    > of 2000-2001).


    That is what a female should weigh. You are not a man. You obviously
    are a pathetically frail individual just holding onto life by a thread.

    You have my condolences.
     
  5. TC

    TC Guest

    TC wrote:
    > http://frenchfood.about.com/od/frenchdiethealth/fr/frenchwomdiet.htm
    >
    > French Women Don't Get Fat
    > >From Debra F.Weber,

    > Your Guide to French Cuisine.
    > Review by Kathryn Morton
    >
    > Women on American low-carb diets like Atkins beware! This book uses
    > common sense and lifestyle habits instead of avoidance to help us lose
    > weight. No negative thoughts about the French here. It's refreshing
    > to read Mrs. Guiliano's positive perspective of the joys of food and
    > drink. She tells us that, as Americans, we need to "assess"
    > ourselves personally instead of "following a diet."


    Contradiction #1 - even though obesity is a diet issue, ignore diet and
    "assess" yourself.


    >
    > She lived it
    > Guiliano has the advantage of having lived both in France, where she
    > was born, and America, where she spends most of her time now as
    > president and CEO of Clicquot, Inc. in New York. She is also director
    > of the champagne house, Veuve Clicquot. Even though she comes from a
    > privileged background (which she readily relates), she knows what


    What does a privileged background have to do with anything?

    > she's talking about, having gained 20 pounds after spending a year as
    > a young woman in America. Upon her return to France, her family was
    > shocked at her "sack of potatoes" appearance. Fed up with her fat
    > silhouette, she connected with family doctor, Dr. Miracle, who guided
    > her back to her the pleasures of French eating habits. She gets our
    > attention and the reader immediately respects her story.
    >
    >
    > What's the Secret?
    > What's the French secret? According to Guiliano, it's quality and
    > pleasure, not avoidance and deprivation. "You owe it to your loved
    > ones as well as yourself to know and pursue your pleasures," she
    > tells us. We must take delight in life, and not give in to our
    > oh-so-American way of quickly eating low quality food while reading or
    > watching TV. We must "maximize the rewards of pleasure...of sensual
    > awareness" and control the quality and quantity of the food and drink
    > we consume. Fresh ingredients paired with slow, sensual eating and
    > drinking is key. Forget about those American sodas filled with sugar,
    > we all need to drink lots of water.


    In other words enjoy food. The unspoken assumption (that happens to be
    correct) is that good food is real food. Fresh whole foods prepared
    with the minimum of processing. Good healthy meats and fats and fresh
    whole carbs, as french cuisine is known for, and relish it all.

    And, oh yeah, cut out the crap carbs.

    >
    > Guiliano intersperses tried and true recipes, a little history of food
    > (chocolate in particular) and family stories that give credence to her
    > writing. Being a Francophile myself, I was thrilled to see snippets of
    > French language and culture sprinkled throughout the book. For the
    > reader who doesn't know French, she thoughtfully places the English
    > translation after the French phrases.


    whoop dee dooo. ohh laa laaaaaa. Then she'll like me, I'm French by
    birth and first language.

    >
    > If you've tried the popular American Atkins diet (as I have), you
    > know that it does not include moderation and it's just not healthy to
    > continue eating all that fat.


    Obviously she has never properly acquainted herself with the Atkins
    diet. And the French diet is Atkins. And they eat "all that fat" and
    then some. And it moderates crappy modern refined carbs. There is your
    moderation.

    > Moderation, balance, exercise, plenty of
    > water, and very fresh ingredients are the reasons why French women
    > don't get fat.


    The French eat copious amounts of healthy animal fats and fewer refined
    carbs than the SAD diet.

    There is little moderation in the French's fat consumption. And the
    balance is not what the American Food pyramid preaches.

    Fresh ingredients is key. Boxed cereals are not fresh ingredients. Nor
    is boxed pasta. Nor is soda. Nor is potato chips. Nor are twinkies. Nor
    are most carbs produced by the food industry in the US.

    > Au revoir to over-indulgence and deprivation, bonjour
    > la joie de vivre!


    Say au revoir to over-indulgence of carbs and deprivation of fats and
    you have something.

    TC
     
  6. You keep saying that you don't eat omega 3's but your statement below completely
    contradicts your claim. Why don't you wake up and learn something instead of
    making claims that contradict each other. Check out

    http://www.nutritiondata.com/

    and get your facts straight.

    You probably won't because you just like to see your handle in print whether or
    not your messsages make sense.

    Ora



    On 24 Feb 2006 00:43:23 -0800, "montygram" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >My diet consists of ice cream, cheese, butter, yogurt, coconut
    >products, bread I make myself (no whole grains, hardly any fat
    >content), fruit, dark chocolate, boiled eggs, and some minor
    >constituents used for flavor, along with Celtic Sea salt. I am about
    >5'9" tall and about 130 pounds (after recovering from the malabsorption
    >of 2000-2001). All of the dairy is whole milk. Most of the food is
    >organic. Everyone else in my family is "obese." The differences in
    >diet are: they eat meat and they consume plenty of refined, highly
    >unsaturated oils.
     
  7. MikeV

    MikeV Guest

    An alternative viewpoint.

    http://news.scotsman.com/features.cfm?id=50512006


    Excerpt:

    French women do get fat
    GILLIAN BOWDITCH
    Would you look younger if you came from Japan? Or be happier as a
    Brazilian? We examine modern stereotypes for traces of myth or
    reality

    In heaven, says the old and decidedly non-PC joke, policemen are
    English, mechanics are German, cooks are French, hotel keepers are
    Swiss and lovers are Italian. In hell, policemen are German, car
    mechanics French, cooks English, hotel keepers Italian and lovers
    Swiss.

    National stereotypes were meant to have gone the way of bowler hats
    and the British Empire. They are a throwback to a less enlightened
    era when Lord Baden-Powell could unblushingly opine in Scouting for
    Boys that the way to tell a foreigner was by looking at his shoes.
    The new empire builders are global brands. Disney, Nike and
    McDonald's are meant to have melded into an international soup.
    We're all inhabitants of the global village now.

    Yet the latest publishing phenomenon plays entirely on the notion
    that the inhabitants of a country share certain traits. Scots-born
    writer AA Gill has stirred up huge controversy (and sales) with The
    Angry Island: Hunting the English, which portrays the English as "a
    lumpen and louty, coarse, unsubtle, beady-eyed, beefy-bummed herd".
    But it is new, positive stereotypes of women that are raking in the
    cash faster than you can say "German with a beach towel".

    Hot on the kitten heels of Mireille Guiliano's bestseller, French
    Women Don't Get Fat, comes Japanese Women Don't Get Old or Fat by
    husband and wife team William Doyle and Naomi Moriyama, hyped as the
    hit diet book of 2006. So do national stereotypes have an upside?
    Let's take a look at the claims.

    THE CLAIM French women don't get fat

    THE CASE FOR Catherine Deneuve, Edith Piaf, Isabelle Adjani

    THE CASE AGAINST Brigitte Bardot, no end of femmes de la maison

    MYTH OR REALITY Myth

    mikeV

    ( PS The Brazilians take the award)
     
  8. TC

    TC Guest

    Statistics have shown that most countries other than Canada and England
    has much lower rates of obesity. And France is only lately starting to
    have a significant increase in obesity, kinda like where the US was in
    the mid to late 1970's when hfcs started becoming ubiquitous in the
    diet, as is happening now in France.

    TC

    MikeV wrote:
    > An alternative viewpoint.
    >
    > http://news.scotsman.com/features.cfm?id=50512006
    >
    >
    > Excerpt:
    >
    > French women do get fat
    > GILLIAN BOWDITCH
    > Would you look younger if you came from Japan? Or be happier as a
    > Brazilian? We examine modern stereotypes for traces of myth or
    > reality
    >
    > In heaven, says the old and decidedly non-PC joke, policemen are
    > English, mechanics are German, cooks are French, hotel keepers are
    > Swiss and lovers are Italian. In hell, policemen are German, car
    > mechanics French, cooks English, hotel keepers Italian and lovers
    > Swiss.
    >
    > National stereotypes were meant to have gone the way of bowler hats
    > and the British Empire. They are a throwback to a less enlightened
    > era when Lord Baden-Powell could unblushingly opine in Scouting for
    > Boys that the way to tell a foreigner was by looking at his shoes.
    > The new empire builders are global brands. Disney, Nike and
    > McDonald's are meant to have melded into an international soup.
    > We're all inhabitants of the global village now.
    >
    > Yet the latest publishing phenomenon plays entirely on the notion
    > that the inhabitants of a country share certain traits. Scots-born
    > writer AA Gill has stirred up huge controversy (and sales) with The
    > Angry Island: Hunting the English, which portrays the English as "a
    > lumpen and louty, coarse, unsubtle, beady-eyed, beefy-bummed herd".
    > But it is new, positive stereotypes of women that are raking in the
    > cash faster than you can say "German with a beach towel".
    >
    > Hot on the kitten heels of Mireille Guiliano's bestseller, French
    > Women Don't Get Fat, comes Japanese Women Don't Get Old or Fat by
    > husband and wife team William Doyle and Naomi Moriyama, hyped as the
    > hit diet book of 2006. So do national stereotypes have an upside?
    > Let's take a look at the claims.
    >
    > THE CLAIM French women don't get fat
    >
    > THE CASE FOR Catherine Deneuve, Edith Piaf, Isabelle Adjani
    >
    > THE CASE AGAINST Brigitte Bardot, no end of femmes de la maison
    >
    > MYTH OR REALITY Myth
    >
    > mikeV
    >
    > ( PS The Brazilians take the award)
     
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