Home Brew Workstand?

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Doki, Dec 30, 2005.

  1. Doki

    Doki Guest

    Anyone made one? Commercial ones seem a bit expensive when you can get an
    engine stand for less...
     
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  2. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, Doki
    ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > Anyone made one? Commercial ones seem a bit expensive when you can get
    > an engine stand for less...


    The clamp is the dear bit. If you have the facilities to make a clamp
    which can grip a tube without crushing it, the rest is easy. Remember
    that good quality bike frames use incredibly thin-walled tubes.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    ;; MS Windows: A thirty-two bit extension ... to a sixteen bit
    ;; patch to an eight bit operating system originally coded for a
    ;; four bit microprocessor and sold by a two-bit company that
    ;; can't stand one bit of competition -- anonymous
     
  3. Dave Kahn

    Dave Kahn Guest

    Simon Brooke wrote:
    > in message <[email protected]>, Doki
    > ('[email protected]') wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Anyone made one? Commercial ones seem a bit expensive when you can get
    >>an engine stand for less...

    >
    > The clamp is the dear bit. If you have the facilities to make a clamp
    > which can grip a tube without crushing it, the rest is easy. Remember
    > that good quality bike frames use incredibly thin-walled tubes.


    Here's a clever idea for a clamp-free recumbent-compatible stand made
    from PVC tubing.

    <http://www.bicyclecommuter.com/PVCWorkStand.htm>

    --
    Dave...
     
  4. Mike Causer

    Mike Causer Guest

    On Fri, 30 Dec 2005 23:26:13 +0000, Doki wrote:

    > Anyone made one? Commercial ones seem a bit expensive when you can get an
    > engine stand for less...


    I've made one, but it's not a conventional design. I'd already got a
    strong steel workbench with a 3" vise bolted to it. The "stand" consists
    of an aluminium tube, smaller in diameter than the seat tube and a little
    bit longer, with the cap from a 35mm file canister on one end. The other
    end has a heavy duty steel hydraulic fitting pushed into it and this goes
    into the vice where the hydraulic fitting stops the tube being crushed.
    The seat tube is taken off the bike and it is then upended onto the tube
    where the BB axle sits on the film can top. It can be swung through about
    300 degrees with _just_ enough clearance on the wall behind.

    This wasn't really a design as such, just something that took ten minutes
    to make using material already to hand. It's lasted 12 years though and
    works fine.

    OTOH for the 'bent I just upend it on the Workmate bench, but that PVC
    pipe stand Dave Kahn mentioned looks very interesting.



    Mike
     
  5. Danny Colyer

    Danny Colyer Guest

    Dave Kahn wrote:
    > Here's a clever idea for a clamp-free recumbent-compatible stand made
    > from PVC tubing.
    >
    > <http://www.bicyclecommuter.com/PVCWorkStand.htm>


    I made one of those a few years ago. It flexes alarmingly under the
    weight of the Street Machine, but it's OK for the wife's lighter wedgie.

    --
    Danny Colyer (my reply address is valid but checked infrequently)
    <URL:http://www.colyer.plus.com/danny/>
    Subscribe to PlusNet <URL:http://www.colyer.plus.com/referral/>
    "He who dares not offend cannot be honest." - Thomas Paine
     
  6. Sandy Morton

    Sandy Morton Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Simon
    Brooke <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Remember that good quality bike frames use incredibly thin-walled
    > tubes.


    Kestrel Engineering (?) make one where the bike sits on the workstand
    - heavy dute plastic V block which fits under the bottom bracket.
    Looks as if it would be easy to copy.

    --
    A T (Sandy) Morton
    on the Bicycle Island
    In the Global Village
    http://www.millport.net
     
  7. Ric

    Ric Guest

    "Doki" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Anyone made one? Commercial ones seem a bit expensive when you can get an
    > engine stand for less...

    I've found the best stand to be hooks on cables suspended from the garage
    roof. It will fit any bike easily, and it is easy to make it height
    adjustable too.
     
  8. Pete Whelan

    Pete Whelan Guest

    Ric wrote:
    > "Doki" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >>Anyone made one? Commercial ones seem a bit expensive when you can get an
    >>engine stand for less...

    >
    > I've found the best stand to be hooks on cables suspended from the garage
    > roof. It will fit any bike easily, and it is easy to make it height
    > adjustable too.
    >
    >


    I've been using a pulley system like that for years. Probably cost me
    less than £5, 15 years ago .... and that was with good quality pulleys.

    --
    ..... don't eat yellow snow
     
  9. Nigel Cliffe

    Nigel Cliffe Guest

    Pete Whelan wrote:
    > Ric wrote:
    >> "Doki" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]
    >>
    >>> Anyone made one? Commercial ones seem a bit expensive when you can
    >>> get an engine stand for less...

    >>
    >> I've found the best stand to be hooks on cables suspended from the
    >> garage roof. It will fit any bike easily, and it is easy to make it
    >> height adjustable too.


    > I've been using a pulley system like that for years. Probably cost me
    > less than £5, 15 years ago .... and that was with good quality
    > pulleys.


    I have two in the garage for storing bikes and working on them. Cost £5 a
    set in Aldi sometime last year when I bought four (two for me, two for a
    friend). Worth watching for a repeat; most Aldi bargains seem to come round
    again. Similar systems are available from other places, such as Mike
    Dyason, for around £20.

    It works with a couple of pulleys in the roof with rope down to a pair of
    pulleys attached to hooks. The hooks can go round handlebars or under a
    seat. There is a locking mechanism to hold the bike at whatever height one
    likes, plus a secondary safety loop to tie the rope back if required.

    The complete pack was pulleys, mounting bits, hooks with plastic protectors,
    rope, and screws to fix it to the roof. Mine are bolted to planks which
    allows me to move them around the rafters of the garage roof, and assembly
    was on a bench rather than above my head.



    - Nigel



    --
    Nigel Cliffe,
    Webmaster at http://www.2mm.org.uk/
     
  10. Doki

    Doki Guest

    "Simon Brooke" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > in message <[email protected]>, Doki
    > ('[email protected]') wrote:
    >
    >> Anyone made one? Commercial ones seem a bit expensive when you can get
    >> an engine stand for less...

    >
    > The clamp is the dear bit. If you have the facilities to make a clamp
    > which can grip a tube without crushing it, the rest is easy. Remember
    > that good quality bike frames use incredibly thin-walled tubes.


    Clamp onto the rather beefy seat tube on my MTB instead?
     
  11. Mark \(MSA\)

    Mark \(MSA\) Guest

    but it's OK for the wife's lighter wedgie.



    Sorry, must admit I laughed at that sentence. Just had to tell
    someone!

    :)


    --
    Mark
    _______________________________________
    Nerves of Steel, Heart of Gold, Knob of Butter
     
  12. Doki

    Doki Guest

    "Simon Brooke" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > in message <[email protected]>, Doki
    > ('[email protected]') wrote:
    >
    >> Anyone made one? Commercial ones seem a bit expensive when you can get
    >> an engine stand for less...

    >
    > The clamp is the dear bit. If you have the facilities to make a clamp
    > which can grip a tube without crushing it, the rest is easy. Remember
    > that good quality bike frames use incredibly thin-walled tubes.


    Also: Does anyone know a good engineering reason why a wooden clamp with a
    27mm hole between the jaws wouldn't work well enough (27.2mm seatpost)?
     
  13. DiddyS

    DiddyS Guest

    "Doki" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Anyone made one? Commercial ones seem a bit expensive when you can get an
    > engine stand for less...
    >

    I was impressed by the PVC work stand mentioned in Dave Kahn's post and
    featured at http://www.bicyclecommuter.com/PVCWorkStand.htm.



    In the USA he used Schedule 40 PVC pipe. I don't know the UK equivalent of
    this, but I assume it is water supply pipe rather than the sort used for
    taking the waste water away.



    My main concern though is whether this type of plastic is affected by
    sunlight as I know that this makes some plastics very brittle and the stand
    will have to live outside. If so would painting it offer suitable
    protection?



    I'd be very grateful if anyone can answer this for me. Sorry if it sounds
    more like plumbing than cycling.



    Derek
     
  14. Sue White

    Sue White Guest

    DiddyS <[email protected]> whizzed past me shouting
    >
    >I'd be very grateful if anyone can answer this for me. Sorry if it sounds
    >more like plumbing than cycling.
    >


    If you don't get a response here, try uk.d-i-y who would really love to
    advise you on this.

    --
    Sue ]:(:)

    Bicycle helmets are really a bit of a scam.
    They make most cyclists slightly less safe but there's money in selling them.
     
  15. DiddyS

    DiddyS Guest

    "Sue White" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > DiddyS <[email protected]> whizzed past me shouting
    >>
    >>I'd be very grateful if anyone can answer this for me. Sorry if it sounds
    >>more like plumbing than cycling.
    >>

    >
    > If you don't get a response here, try uk.d-i-y who would really love to
    > advise you on this.
    >
    > --
    > Sue ]:(:)
    >
    > Bicycle helmets are really a bit of a scam.
    > They make most cyclists slightly less safe but there's money in selling
    > them.
    >
    >

    Thanks, Sue.

    Derek.
     
  16. DiddyS

    DiddyS Guest

    "DiddyS" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "Sue White" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> DiddyS <[email protected]> whizzed past me shouting
    >>>
    >>>I'd be very grateful if anyone can answer this for me. Sorry if it sounds
    >>>more like plumbing than cycling.
    >>>

    >>
    >> If you don't get a response here, try uk.d-i-y who would really love to
    >> advise you on this.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Sue ]:(:)
    >>
    >> Bicycle helmets are really a bit of a scam.
    >> They make most cyclists slightly less safe but there's money in selling
    >> them.
    >>
    >>

    > Thanks, Sue.
    >
    > Derek.


    Sue, I've just had a look at uk.d-i-y and it's brilliant. I'm sure they'll
    be able to help me sort out my central heating as well!

    Many thanks,

    Derek.
     
  17. Sue White

    Sue White Guest

    DiddyS <[email protected]> whizzed past me shouting
    >
    >Sue, I've just had a look at uk.d-i-y and it's brilliant. I'm sure they'll
    >be able to help me sort out my central heating as well!
    >


    I need to choose an SDS drill, I'll see you over there...

    --
    Sue ];:))
     
  18. In article <[email protected]>, DiddyS wrote:
    >
    >Sue, I've just had a look at uk.d-i-y and it's brilliant. I'm sure they'll
    >be able to help me sort out my central heating as well!


    Unless the quote for replacing all the perishing hoses in my underfloor
    heating system is a lot less than I expect, I'm going to be converting to
    radiators soon, so I may see you there. Another leak yesterday :-(
     
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