home-made headset cup press?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Ari, Jun 2, 2003.

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  1. Ari

    Ari Guest

    Anyone out there have the instructions for assembling a headset cup press from stuff found at a
    hardware store? IIRC, it involves a threaded axle, large washers, etc.
     
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  2. On Mon, 2 Jun 2003, ari wrote:
    > Anyone out there have the instructions for assembling a headset cup press from stuff found at a
    > hardware store? IIRC, it involves a threaded axle, large washers, etc.

    A carpenter-type clamp. A convenient tube. A nice washer made of soft material (nylon is fine). A
    couple of blocks of hard wood. A mallet.

    Some care!

    Sergio Pisa
     
  3. Bruce

    Bruce Guest

    Get the largest diameter threaded axle that fits inside the headset cups, and longer then
    the headtube.

    Add a few nuts and washers. Get extras (at least 4 of each). Get washers that are larger outside
    diameter then the headset cups.

    -Bruce

    "ari" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Anyone out there have the instructions for assembling a headset cup press from stuff found at a
    > hardware store? IIRC, it involves a threaded axle, large washers, etc.
     
  4. Kbh

    Kbh Guest

    A recent issue of the Rivendell Reader has detailed instructions and pictures. You can get back
    issues, some on paper and some on CD. Email them and I'm sure they can tell you which issue.
    www.rivbike.com

    Kyle

    "ari" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Anyone out there have the instructions for assembling a headset cup press from stuff found at a
    > hardware store? IIRC, it involves a threaded axle, large washers, etc.
     
  5. Eflayer

    Eflayer Guest

  6. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    "ari" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    > Anyone out there have the instructions for assembling a
    headset cup press
    > from stuff found at a hardware store? IIRC, it involves a
    threaded axle,
    > large washers, etc.

    Well, you got it right there. A big bolt and/or threaded rod, a couple of big washers, and a couple
    of nuts ought to do it.

    Sometimes you can tap them in with a hammer. I used to have an anvil in my driveway, as sort of a
    rustic yard ornament. It really came in handy for this kind of thing.

    Matt O.
     
  7. Jeff

    Jeff Guest

  8. Ant

    Ant Guest

    "ari" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Anyone out there have the instructions for assembling a headset cup press from stuff found at a
    > hardware store? IIRC, it involves a threaded axle, large washers, etc.

    howdy ari,

    i asked a similar question a while back. while i intended to do some machining, others responded
    with good info that might be of interest to you.

    one fellow posted a link, IIRC, of his hardware store press that was quite nice. thelink was
    http://tinyurl.com/dbgc. he used brass bushings which essentially did the same as my machined setup,
    but not adjustable for various cup sizes. i admit that i dont think my local hardware store has
    these bushings, but his did, so its worth a shot where you are.

    however, when i checked forhis link, it was gone. perhaps mr. s could re-upload it?

    the thread was http://tinyurl.com/dbfz

    i also think this has been mentioned a few times before, so perhaps a Google archive search woudlnt
    be a waste of time,

    cheers

    anthony
     
  9. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >Anyone out there have the instructions for assembling a headset cup press from stuff found at a
    >hardware store? IIRC, it involves a threaded axle, large washers, etc.

    That's it. It is not a complex tool. You will have to shop for washers that fit nicely into your
    head sets cups without scratch the race face.
    -----------------
    Alex __O _-\<,_ (_)/ (_)
     
  10. John Everett

    John Everett Guest

    On Mon, 02 Jun 2003 21:43:19 GMT, "ari" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Anyone out there have the instructions for assembling a headset cup press from stuff found at a
    >hardware store? IIRC, it involves a threaded axle, large washers, etc.

    Does anyone else here remember the article in Bicycling about ten or twelve years ago that
    recommended seating the cups and cones using the headset itself? The author recommended placing the
    various pieces (bearings included) in place and then cranking down on the upper cup until everything
    is seated.

    There followed a great hue and cry via the letters-to-the-editor section about how this was a good
    way to ruin a new headset, but it all seemed to make sense to me. As I recall, the author of the
    article was a former auto mechanic and bicycling hobbyist who was just applying principles he'd
    learned elsewhere to the practice of bicycle maintenance.

    I suppose I should point out that a fellow member of our bike club owns a Park headset tool which
    serves as a club resource. I've always used that in lieu of trying the above referenced method.

    jeverett3<AT>earthlink<DOT>net http://home.earthlink.net/~jeverett3
     
  11. Steve Maas

    Steve Maas Guest

    A picture of mine is at

    http://www.nonlintec.com/allegro/headset_press_1953.jpg.

    I have also used just threaded rod and washers, but you have to be extremely careful that the
    headset does not get cocked as you squeeze it
    in. Also, it's possible to get fine-threaded 3/8" rod, 24 threads per inch, I think, instead of the
    18 TPI that I used (and will soon replace). I recommend the former.

    ari wrote:

    > Anyone out there have the instructions for assembling a headset cup press from stuff found at a
    > hardware store? IIRC, it involves a threaded axle, large washers, etc.
    >
    >
     
  12. Ya know, I really don't understand this. How often do you need to press in cups at home? The time
    and money to build one is certainly higher than the trip to the bike shop where, when shown two cups
    and a frameset, will press them in for $5-$10???

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  13. Mark Hickey

    Mark Hickey Guest

    [email protected] (Qui si parla Campagnolo) wrote:

    >Ya know, I really don't understand this. How often do you need to press in cups at home? The time
    >and money to build one is certainly higher than the trip to the bike shop where, when shown two
    >cups and a frameset, will press them in for $5-$10???

    Peter, it's obviously just an excuse to own another tool. Do any of us need MORE rationalization
    than that? ;-)

    Mark Hickey Habanero Cycles http://www.habcycles.com Home of the $695 ti frame
     
  14. Jose Rizal

    Jose Rizal Guest

    Qui si parla Campagnolo:

    > Ya know, I really don't understand this. How often do you need to press in cups at home?

    Not very often at all.

    > The time and money to build one is certainly higher than the trip to the bike shop where, when
    > shown two cups and a frameset, will press them in for $5-$10???

    Timewise there is not much difference. Moneywise it's cheaper to build your own.

    LBS option - load and transport the frame to the bike shop to get the headset pressed, then pay
    $5-$10 for it. Transport the frame back home.

    DIY option - go to the local hardware store and pay $2-$3 for the threaded rod and bolts. Do the job
    at home with favourite music and brew on. Added bonus: acquire a technical skill.

    The job is simple enough that it's not easy to stuff up. I say that for most people, do the simple
    jobs at home, and get the LBS to do slightly more complicated jobs such as suspension fork
    servicing, and BB and hub overhauls.
     
  15. Steve Maas

    Steve Maas Guest

    Is it really that hard to understand? I don't think so.

    I'm an extreme case: I work as an engineering consultant. Every hour I put into bicycle work and
    riding is a lost billable hour, and, believe me, NONE of that is cost effective. Still, I do it. I
    suppose it might be cheaper to work, save the money, and pay for the heart surgery, but the
    exercise, enjoyment, stress relief of having a project is worth something, too.

    Steve Maas Long Beach, California

    ------------------------------

    Qui si parla Campagnolo wrote:

    Ya know, I really don't understand this. How often do you need to press in cups at home? The time
    and money to build one is certainly higher than the trip to the bike shop where, when shown two cups
    and a frameset, will press them in for $5-$10???

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  16. Jim

    Jim Guest

    [email protected] (Qui si parla Campagnolo) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Ya know, I really don't understand this. How often do you need to press in cups at home? The time
    > and money to build one is certainly higher than the trip to the bike shop where, when shown two
    > cups and a frameset, will press them in for $5-$10???
    >
    > Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria
    >

    You apparently don't appreciate the fact that some people would rather do things themselves than
    pay other people to do it. One reason I like messing about with bikes is the "doing", not just
    the riding. I didn't spend any more on the hardware to make my own press than it would have cost
    me to have a shop install one headset, and now I still have "the tool" which is generic enough
    that I can use the pieces for other tinkering. And, not everybody lives within reasonable
    distance of a competent bike mechanic, but usually there is a local hardware store that has the
    stuff that is needed.

    Jim McKim
     
  17. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    "Qui si parla Campagnolo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > Ya know, I really don't understand this. How often do you
    need to press in cups
    > at home? The time and money to build one is certainly
    higher than the trip to
    > the bike shop where, when shown two cups and a frameset,
    will press them in for
    > $5-$10???

    Where is that shop? Certainly not in southern CA, where it's more like $30. And they won't do it
    until next Wednesday.

    Matt O.
     
  18. Lee

    Lee Guest

    Mark writes:

    > >Ya know, I really don't understand this. How often do you need to press
    in cups
    > >at home? The time and money to build one is certainly higher than the
    trip to
    > >the bike shop where, when shown two cups and a frameset, will press them
    in for
    > >$5-$10???
    >
    > Peter, it's obviously just an excuse to own another tool. Do any of us need MORE rationalization
    > than that? ;-)

    "Mark Hickey" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...

    > [email protected] (Qui si parla Campagnolo) wrote:

    >

    > >Ya know, I really don't understand this. How often do you need to press
    in cups

    > >at home? The time and money to build one is certainly higher than the
    trip to

    > >the bike shop where, when shown two cups and a frameset, will press them
    in for

    > >$5-$10???

    >

    > Peter, it's obviously just an excuse to own another tool. Do any of

    > us need MORE rationalization than that? ;-)

    Um, I don't think so. First there's the cup press. Then there's the phallic shaped tool that is
    used to remove the cups. Then you've got different sized bearing cups, so you might need a
    couple of them.

    Then...

    Oh you get the point. It's an excuse to own a whole bunch of tools!

    :)

    I *coulda* driven over to my LBS and asked them to align my cups. They're 10 minutes away, prolly
    wouldn't even have charged me anything.

    But no, I had to go buy the Park tools so I could do it at home, at my leisure :)

    ...the theory being that I might have to do it more than once!

    Lee
     
  19. Ah but that all LBSs would be as friendly as Peter's. Here's a more typical experience:

    Load up bike and kids (make em put some shoes on, check for dirty diapers) and head to LBS
    (20 minutes)

    Be told that you'll have to leave it there for 24-48 hours because they can't get to it right away.
    Leave it an go away discouraged.

    Load up kids and go back to bike store 2 days later and pay $25

    This is what happens to me every time which is why I'm reading this thread.

    Regards Chris

    Mark Hickey wrote:
    > [email protected] (Qui si parla Campagnolo) wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Ya know, I really don't understand this. How often do you need to press in cups at home? The time
    >>and money to build one is certainly higher than the trip to the bike shop where, when shown two
    >>cups and a frameset, will press them in for $5-$10???
    >
    >
    > Peter, it's obviously just an excuse to own another tool. Do any of us need MORE rationalization
    > than that? ;-)
    >
    > Mark Hickey Habanero Cycles http://www.habcycles.com Home of the $695 ti frame
     
  20. Ant

    Ant Guest

    [email protected] (Qui si parla Campagnolo) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Ya know, I really don't understand this. How often do you need to press in cups at home? The time
    > and money to build one is certainly higher than the trip to the bike shop where, when shown two
    > cups and a frameset, will press them in for $5-$10???

    whoa nelly, dont get me started.. too late.

    first off, at this stage in my life i have more time than money. second off, the machine shop i was
    working in was giving me material for free. third off, (third off?), it didnt take me that long. i
    measured a park tool when i went to a lbs (time estimated: 1 minute), and did some very simple lathe
    turning, (time estimated: 40 minutes for all the bits and pieces, and i made an extra set of stepped
    rings for myself, and a set for a friend.)

    even if i hadnt been getting material for free, this tool would have cost me an hour, and 12
    dollars. and works, IMO, better than the park tool, at the slight cost of an additional 30 seconds
    per headset press becuase you have to thread the lower handle on, instead of slide it on. from a
    rational standpoint, it makes great sense. minimal cash, traded for a lifetime of saved cash going
    to the LBS to have them do mine. but the rational standpoint misses the basic motive here, which is
    i like making things, and nothign gives more joy than making a tool you use. it is a 'means', not an
    'end', and doubly good, for the 'end' is excellent too.

    catch you on the flip side,

    anthony
     
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