Home Made Lights......Thanks Hippy

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by Gags, Jun 9, 2003.

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  1. Ray

    Ray Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > Great link thanks wow 0.4C that's some charge rate. Can you top the water up in these batteries?
    > My understanding was that much above 13.8V you start bubbling off hydrogen/oxygen so it needs to
    > be replaced. Panasonic seem to disagree with most of what l have read about charging batteries,
    > but you would have to think they know what they are talking about. How many times have you cycled
    > your batteries?(just wondering how many deep discharges they will take)
    >
    Well so far I would guess about 2-3 months worth of daily commutes, I recharge every time I get to
    work. So there isn't a huge history yet, say 50 charges so far...

    As for gassing, I got the impression the Sealed Lead Acid batteries are preferably known as
    Valve Regulated Lead Acid these days. Apparently the valve system reduces the incidence of lost
    gas and any gas formed is re- combined fairly well. And no, being sealed you cannot add water,
    the electrolyte is actually a gel and the cells can be safely used upside down without worrying
    about leakage.

    Even so to avoid any gassing potential, I wouldn't leave the things on a
    14.7V charge for more than 12 hours max. :)

    Cheers Ray
     


  2. Gags

    Gags Guest

    Stu,

    I have been using my 12V, 4.1Ah SLA (or more correctly, Valve Regulated Lead Acid) Battery for a bit
    over a year now for regular commutes to and from work. Apart from the summer months, it runs a 20W
    halogen five times a week for between 40min to about an hour and a half depending on the time of
    year. (Thats about 1.66 Amps). As Ray has done, I use a simple voltage regulator circuit which in my
    case is a 15V regulator with a diode in series to drop the voltage to about 14.3V (about 2.38V per
    cell). The regulator has a built in current limit of 1A so I am never charging at greater than C/4.
    I always leave the battery on-charge overnight and a few times have forgotten and left it on over
    the whole weekend. My battery is still going strong.....pretty good seeing as it initially cost me
    about 30 bucks. If you want a look at my charger, have a look at
    http://members.ozemail.com.au/~drgagnon/Battery%20Charger.htm

    Cheers,

    Gags

    "Ray" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > > Great link thanks wow 0.4C that's some charge rate. Can you top the water up in these batteries?
    > > My understanding was that much above 13.8V you start bubbling off hydrogen/oxygen so it needs to
    > > be replaced. Panasonic seem to disagree with most of what l have read about charging batteries,
    > > but you would have to think they know what they are talking about. How many times have you
    > > cycled your batteries?(just wondering how many
    deep
    > > discharges they will take)
    > >
    > Well so far I would guess about 2-3 months worth of daily commutes, I recharge every time I get to
    > work. So there isn't a huge history yet, say 50 charges so far...
    >
    > As for gassing, I got the impression the Sealed Lead Acid batteries are preferably known as Valve
    > Regulated Lead Acid these days. Apparently the valve system reduces the incidence of lost gas and
    > any gas formed is re- combined fairly well. And no, being sealed you cannot add water, the
    > electrolyte is actually a gel and the cells can be safely used upside down without worrying about
    > leakage.
    >
    > Even so to avoid any gassing potential, I wouldn't leave the things on a
    > 14.7V charge for more than 12 hours max. :)
    >
    > Cheers Ray
     
  3. Gags

    Gags Guest

    ..snip.. Adrian Tritschler wrote.....

    If you'd like a suggestion for another project.. maybe try a handheld mobile phone detector and
    jammer :) Now *that* would be useful on the bike.

    ..snip..

    Adrian,

    hadn't thought of that one although there was one guy at uni who did develop a mobile phone
    detector.........one circuit that did get a run was during one of the electronic design labs where
    guys were supposed to be making an FM transmitter (it was digitally controlled for frequency and
    involved trimming a piece of coax to make a resonant circuit) that had a power output of 100mW or
    something like that. A guy I knew made one with an output of about 10W (enough to transmit over the
    top of commercial radio stations at short distances) which provided some good laughs when hooked up
    inside a car and set to one of the more popular radio stations in Canberra. We then proceeded to
    drive around and basically dribble crap into a mic.......could see quite a few of the surrounding
    drivers in traffic playing with their radios when they suddenly heard...."HEY YOU.....IN THE BLUE
    COMMODORE.....SLOW DOWN YOU FOOL!!!!!".

    I never did get the chance to hook it up to the battery on the bike............has all sorts of
    possibilities though......

    Gags
     
  4. Tony F

    Tony F Guest

    On Mon, 9 Jun 2003 21:39:32 +1000, "hippy" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >"Gags" <[email protected]_ozemail.com.au> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]...
    >> First look in here for a while and I read the "Your Commuter" thread
    >started
    >> by Hippy.........gotta thank u for the inspiration on the lights Hip,
    >yours
    >
    >woah woah! I started the commuter thread, but it's the FAT HIPPY that is the lighting wizard. He
    >has inspired many people to build their own bike lights (one of these days I'll build a set - I
    >promise! :) ) and deserves much credit.

    Blush, but really... No, no no, I'm not a lighting wizard, just this bloke who realised how simple
    lights are, and how cheaply they could be built, and wrote a web page about it. Then another, and
    another... ;^)

    The point I trying to make is that any old boofhead can build their own lights cheaply, yet still
    get great performance. I figured if this ham fisted old boofhead could do it, anybody could. You
    don't need to a wizard, a guru, or even particularly handy to make your own lights, especially ones
    like my MkIVs, which don't even need soldering.
    >
    >On the subject of lights.. I just bought two MR16 "Superglo" 50w 12v dichroic halogen globes. They
    >are "open reflector" whatever that means, with a 38 degree beam spread. They are made by an aussie
    >company Superlux. They only cost ~$2 for the two - are these globes going to be totally crap for
    >bike lighting purposes? I'm just buying little bits I see so that one day I might have all the bits
    >and then the construction urge will hit.. ;-)

    Seems to be only one real way to find out - use them! I reckon they're too wide a spread, but plenty
    would disagree with me.

    I should also say I've just bought 2 x Jaycar globes (20W 12V, 12 deg), and each is considerably
    better than the last lot I bought from them, which were rubbish. These ones are nearly as good as
    the best I've ever bought. Time will tell how they last.
    >
    >cheers hippy (a fat one, not THE fat one..)

    Tony F http://www.thefathippy.com
     
  5. Col Jones

    Col Jones Guest

    On Mon, 9 Jun 2003 21:39:32 +1000, "hippy" <[email protected]> wrote:

    SNIP

    >On the subject of lights.. I just bought two MR16 "Superglo" 50w 12v dichroic halogen globes. They
    >are "open reflector" whatever that means, with a 38 degree beam spread. They are made by an aussie
    >company Superlux.

    "open reflector" globes have no transparent shield on the front of the glass and so will allow dirt
    to contaminate both the reflective surface and globe and be difficult to clean. The bulb is also
    more prone to failure with changes in temp and moisture (ie it can get wet and explode).

    38 degrees is really too wide and 50 watts will draw about 4 amps thus limitting your rides.

    You are better off thinking in terms of two lights of 20 watts with narrower beams (maybe a skinny
    and a super skinny) and running them one at a time. This will give you a beam for all seasons,
    together with redundancy and low power consumption and if you need a bit of grunt you can always
    switch the other in and pretend you are a Mac on the 'ume 'ighway.

    cheers col
     
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