home made sour cream

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by jenny, Nov 22, 2005.

  1. jenny

    jenny Guest

    does it exist a way for cooking sour cream at home?? looking for.
     
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  2. jenny wrote:
    > does it exist a way for cooking sour cream at home?? looking for.
    >


    no. sour cream can only be created in a factory, like all other food
    products.

    --

    saerah

    "Peace is not an absence of war, it is a virtue, a state of mind, a
    disposition for benevolence, confidence, justice."
    -Baruch Spinoza

    "There is a theory which states that if ever anybody discovers exactly
    what the Universe is for and why it is here, it will instantly disappear
    and be replaced by something even more bizarre and inexplicable. There
    is another theory which states that this has already happened."
    -Douglas Adams
     
  3. jenny wrote:
    > does it exist a way for cooking sour cream at home?? looking for.
    >


    no. sour cream can only be created in a factory, like all other food
    products.

    --

    saerah

    "Peace is not an absence of war, it is a virtue, a state of mind, a
    disposition for benevolence, confidence, justice."
    -Baruch Spinoza

    "There is a theory which states that if ever anybody discovers exactly
    what the Universe is for and why it is here, it will instantly disappear
    and be replaced by something even more bizarre and inexplicable. There
    is another theory which states that this has already happened."
    -Douglas Adams
     
  4. Ophelia

    Ophelia Guest

    "jenny" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > does it exist a way for cooking sour cream at home?? looking for.


    You can sour cream by adding a spoonful of lemon. I do that if I have
    forgotten to buy it.
     
  5. Dan Abel

    Dan Abel Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "jenny" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > does it exist a way for cooking sour cream at home?? looking for.


    My father used to make it. He would buy some really heavy cream from
    the dairy store and leave it out overnight on the stove (the gas stove
    had a pilot light). It was really thick. I'm a little hazy on the
    details, as it's been forty years.

    --
    Dan Abel
    [email protected]
    Petaluma, California, USA
     
  6. Dimitri

    Dimitri Guest

    "jenny" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > does it exist a way for cooking sour cream at home?? looking for.


    See below

    Dimitri

    http://www.ochef.com/516.htm


    Sour cream has long been a traditional ingredient in Russian, Eastern European
    and German cooking, and has gained popularity in the rest of Europe, North
    America, and other parts of the world in the past 50 years or so. It was
    traditionally made by letting fresh cream sour naturally - the acids and
    bacteria present produced a generally consistent flavor and thick texture that
    went well with both sweet and savory dishes. These days, commercially produced
    sour cream is made by inoculating pasteurized light cream with bacteria
    cultures, letting the bacteria grow until the cream is both soured and thick,
    and then repasteruizing it to stop the process.


    Sour cream cannot be made at home with pasteurized cream; the lack of bacteria
    in the cream will cause the cream to spoil instead of sour. If you have access
    to unpasteruized heavy cream, you can add 1 Tbsp of vinegar to 2 cups of cream
    and let the mixture stand out at room temperature for several hours until
    curdled.

    If you can't get unpasteurized cream, you can still make a version of crème
    fraîche, which is also a soured cream. The taste is generally milder than that
    of sour cream, but it may be an acceptable substitute for you in recipes that
    call for sour cream. You can make crème fraîche by adding 1 cup of buttermilk to
    2 cups of heavy cream and leaving it out in a warm place (80° to 90°F, or 26° to
    32°C, is ideal) for as few as eight hours and as many as 24 hours. One of the
    benefits of crème fraîche is that it can be whipped.
     
  7. ~patches~

    ~patches~ Guest

    jenny wrote:

    > does it exist a way for cooking sour cream at home?? looking for.
    >

    I've made homemade sour cream a few times using buttermilk as the
    starter. Here's one recipe for homemade sour cream.
    http://www.cdkitchen.com/recipes/recs/4/Homemade_Sour_Cream14845.shtml

    If you search google with the key words "homemade sour cream" you will
    find quite a few recipes.
     
  8. On Tue, 22 Nov 2005, Dan Abel wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "jenny" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > does it exist a way for cooking sour cream at home?? looking for.

    >
    > My father used to make it. He would buy some really heavy cream from
    > the dairy store and leave it out overnight on the stove (the gas stove
    > had a pilot light). It was really thick. I'm a little hazy on the
    > details, as it's been forty years.
    >
    > --
    > Dan Abel
    > [email protected]
    > Petaluma, California, USA
    >


    My grandmother and my great-grandmother (different sides of the family)
    both made "soured cream' (aka clotted cream, clabbered cream). They use
    some of it as sour cream, but most of it was used to make butter. They,
    both, set it in a warm place overnight (or longer) to allow the natural
    "nasties" to work. Neither used a commercial cream. Both use separated
    cream pulled from the cow.

    Later in life, when my grandmother didn't have a cow, but she needed
    buttermilk, she would add some vinegar to store-bought milk in order to
    make it "clabber" into sour milk. You could probably do the same with
    heavy cream.

    If cream has been pasteurized (boiled to kill the nasties) you probably
    couldn't just let it set out to clabber because the nasties that will set
    to work would probably hurt you.

    Elaine, too
     
  9. On 22 Nov 2005 10:12:18 -0800, "jenny" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >does it exist a way for cooking sour cream at home?? looking for.


    Why would you want to make something you can buy already made?
     
  10. On Wed, 23 Nov 2005 01:53:20 -0600, [email protected] wrote:

    >On 22 Nov 2005 10:12:18 -0800, "jenny" <[email protected]>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>does it exist a way for cooking sour cream at home?? looking for.

    >
    >Why would you want to make something you can buy already made?


    A lot of people make things they could buy already made. For the
    satisfaction of having created something themselves. And because
    you'll oftentimes get much better quality when you make it yourself.

    Sorry I can't help with making sour cream. I buy mine, but I wish you
    success, Jenny, in making your own.

    Carol
    --
    Wash away the gray to respond.
     
  11. In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] wrote:

    > On 22 Nov 2005 10:12:18 -0800, "jenny" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >does it exist a way for cooking sour cream at home?? looking for.

    >
    > Why would you want to make something you can buy already made?


    Why would you cook a meal when you could go out and get McDonalds?

    Regards,
    Ranee

    Remove do not & spam to e-mail me.

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
    http://talesfromthekitchen.blogspot.com/
     
  12. In article <[email protected]>,
    sarah bennett <[email protected]> wrote:

    > no. sour cream can only be created in a factory, like all other food
    > products.


    LOL! This reminds me of the fellow who was so impressed that my mom
    could make waffles at home. He thought you could only get them at
    restaurants. She asked him how he thought they made them.

    Regards,
    Ranee

    Remove do not & spam to e-mail me.

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
    http://talesfromthekitchen.blogspot.com/
     
  13. Ranee Mueller wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > sarah bennett <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>no. sour cream can only be created in a factory, like all other food
    >>products.

    >
    >
    > LOL! This reminds me of the fellow who was so impressed that my mom
    > could make waffles at home. He thought you could only get them at
    > restaurants. She asked him how he thought they made them.
    >
    > Regards,
    > Ranee


    hee!

    btw, I love your sig!


    --

    saerah

    "Peace is not an absence of war, it is a virtue, a state of mind, a
    disposition for benevolence, confidence, justice."
    -Baruch Spinoza

    "There is a theory which states that if ever anybody discovers exactly
    what the Universe is for and why it is here, it will instantly disappear
    and be replaced by something even more bizarre and inexplicable. There
    is another theory which states that this has already happened."
    -Douglas Adams
     
  14. Ranee Mueller wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > sarah bennett <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>no. sour cream can only be created in a factory, like all other food
    >>products.

    >
    >
    > LOL! This reminds me of the fellow who was so impressed that my mom
    > could make waffles at home. He thought you could only get them at
    > restaurants. She asked him how he thought they made them.
    >
    > Regards,
    > Ranee


    hee!

    btw, I love your sig!


    --

    saerah

    "Peace is not an absence of war, it is a virtue, a state of mind, a
    disposition for benevolence, confidence, justice."
    -Baruch Spinoza

    "There is a theory which states that if ever anybody discovers exactly
    what the Universe is for and why it is here, it will instantly disappear
    and be replaced by something even more bizarre and inexplicable. There
    is another theory which states that this has already happened."
    -Douglas Adams
     
  15. On Wed, 23 Nov 2005 14:14:13 -0800, Ranee Mueller
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>,
    > sarah bennett <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> no. sour cream can only be created in a factory, like all other food
    >> products.

    >
    > LOL! This reminds me of the fellow who was so impressed that my mom
    >could make waffles at home. He thought you could only get them at
    >restaurants. She asked him how he thought they made them.


    <veering off-topic>

    My ex-sister-in-law was amazed when my mom made gingersnaps. She had
    no idea you could make them at home. Some people's kids! <G>

    Carol
    --
    Wash away the gray to respond.
     
  16. On Wed, 23 Nov 2005 14:14:13 -0800, Ranee Mueller
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>,
    > sarah bennett <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> no. sour cream can only be created in a factory, like all other food
    >> products.

    >
    > LOL! This reminds me of the fellow who was so impressed that my mom
    >could make waffles at home. He thought you could only get them at
    >restaurants. She asked him how he thought they made them.


    <veering off-topic>

    My ex-sister-in-law was amazed when my mom made gingersnaps. She had
    no idea you could make them at home. Some people's kids! <G>

    Carol
    --
    Wash away the gray to respond.
     
  17. Dan Abel

    Dan Abel Guest

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    Elaine Parrish <[email protected]> wrote:


    > > My father used to make it. He would buy some really heavy cream from
    > > the dairy store and leave it out overnight on the stove (the gas stove
    > > had a pilot light). It was really thick. I'm a little hazy on the
    > > details, as it's been forty years.
    > >
    > > --
    > > Dan Abel
    > > [email protected]
    > > Petaluma, California, USA
    > >

    >
    > My grandmother and my great-grandmother (different sides of the family)
    > both made "soured cream' (aka clotted cream, clabbered cream). They use
    > some of it as sour cream, but most of it was used to make butter.


    I've never heard of sour cream used to make butter.

    --
    Dan Abel
    [email protected]
    Petaluma, California, USA
     
  18. Dan Abel

    Dan Abel Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] wrote:

    > On 22 Nov 2005 10:12:18 -0800, "jenny" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >does it exist a way for cooking sour cream at home?? looking for.

    >
    > Why would you want to make something you can buy already made?


    Because the sour cream you usually get in stores in the US doesn't taste
    anything like the kind that my father made.

    --
    Dan Abel
    [email protected]
    Petaluma, California, USA
     
  19. Dan Abel

    Dan Abel Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Ranee Mueller <[email protected]> wrote:


    > LOL! This reminds me of the fellow who was so impressed that my mom
    > could make waffles at home. He thought you could only get them at
    > restaurants. She asked him how he thought they made them.



    Some things can't be made at home. At least easily.

    We made some children at home. It wasn't really hard, and we have three
    of them. When my younger son was little, he announced that he had found
    out about sex, and it was really disgusting. He couldn't believe that
    we had actually done it three times!


    :)

    --
    Dan Abel
    [email protected]
    Petaluma, California, USA
     
  20. On Wed, 23 Nov 2005, Dan Abel wrote:

    > In article
    > <[email protected]>,
    > Elaine Parrish <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    > > > My father used to make it. He would buy some really heavy cream from
    > > > the dairy store and leave it out overnight on the stove (the gas stove
    > > > had a pilot light). It was really thick. I'm a little hazy on the
    > > > details, as it's been forty years.
    > > >
    > > > --
    > > > Dan Abel
    > > > [email protected]
    > > > Petaluma, California, USA
    > > >

    > >
    > > My grandmother and my great-grandmother (different sides of the family)
    > > both made "soured cream' (aka clotted cream, clabbered cream). They use
    > > some of it as sour cream, but most of it was used to make butter.

    >
    > I've never heard of sour cream used to make butter.
    >
    > --
    > Dan Abel
    > [email protected]
    > Petaluma, California, USA
    >


    Well, it's not sour cream like you buy in the store. It was "soured" cream
    or clabbered cream (as my people called it). The cream was left to clabber
    or "sour" naturally. Today, it would be called "cultured", probably. The
    finished butter was called "butter". The stuff we buy today in stores is
    made out of "fresh" cream and is labeled (and was called back then) "Sweet
    Cream Butter". Sweet Cream butter didn't have the "shelf" life of
    clabbered cream butter and it doesn't have near the rich, full taste or
    the golden yellow color.

    Clabbered cream butter had a bite to it like sour cream (verses heavy
    cream) or yogurt which are made from a cultured cream not sweet cream.
    Back in those days, buttermilk was a by-product of clabbered cream butter
    making and was a much different product than today's buttermilk.

    Elaine, too
     
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