home made sour cream



N

No One

Guest
What if you make home made yogurt (I have a thing to make it) and instead of
using yogurt as the starter you use sour cream as the starter? That might
make sour cream. Just a thought.

Dennis.
-------------------------------------------------------------
"Dan Abel" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> In article <[email protected]>,
> [email protected] wrote:
>
> > On 22 Nov 2005 10:12:18 -0800, "jenny" <[email protected]>
> > wrote:
> >
> > >does it exist a way for cooking sour cream at home?? looking for.

> >
> > Why would you want to make something you can buy already made?

>
> Because the sour cream you usually get in stores in the US doesn't taste
> anything like the kind that my father made.
>
> --
> Dan Abel
> [email protected]
> Petaluma, California, USA
 
Z

zxcvbob

Guest
Elaine Parrish wrote:
>
> On Wed, 23 Nov 2005, Dan Abel wrote:
>
>
>>In article
>><[email protected]>,
>> Elaine Parrish <[email protected]> wrote:
>>
>>
>>
>>>>My father used to make it. He would buy some really heavy cream from
>>>>the dairy store and leave it out overnight on the stove (the gas stove
>>>>had a pilot light). It was really thick. I'm a little hazy on the
>>>>details, as it's been forty years.
>>>>
>>>>--
>>>>Dan Abel
>>>>[email protected]
>>>>Petaluma, California, USA
>>>>
>>>
>>>My grandmother and my great-grandmother (different sides of the family)
>>>both made "soured cream' (aka clotted cream, clabbered cream). They use
>>>some of it as sour cream, but most of it was used to make butter.

>>
>>I've never heard of sour cream used to make butter.
>>
>>--
>>Dan Abel
>>[email protected]
>>Petaluma, California, USA
>>

>
>
> Well, it's not sour cream like you buy in the store. It was "soured" cream
> or clabbered cream (as my people called it). The cream was left to clabber
> or "sour" naturally. Today, it would be called "cultured", probably. The
> finished butter was called "butter". The stuff we buy today in stores is
> made out of "fresh" cream and is labeled (and was called back then) "Sweet
> Cream Butter". Sweet Cream butter didn't have the "shelf" life of
> clabbered cream butter and it doesn't have near the rich, full taste or
> the golden yellow color.
>
> Clabbered cream butter had a bite to it like sour cream (verses heavy
> cream) or yogurt which are made from a cultured cream not sweet cream.
> Back in those days, buttermilk was a by-product of clabbered cream butter
> making and was a much different product than today's buttermilk.
>
> Elaine, too
>



Clabbered cream butter was always made from cow's milk. You wouldn't
want to make it from goat's milk cuz it would taste nasty. (or so I've
been told.) Goat's milk could be used for sweet cream butter, but you
had to separate the cream with a mechanical cream separator first
because it wouldn't separate on it's own.

I dunno why I know this stuff...

Bob
 
E

Elaine Parrish

Guest
On Thu, 24 Nov 2005, zxcvbob wrote:

> Elaine Parrish wrote:
> >
> > On Wed, 23 Nov 2005, Dan Abel wrote:
> >
> >
> >>In article
> >><[email protected]>,
> >> Elaine Parrish <[email protected]> wrote:
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>>>My father used to make it. He would buy some really heavy cream from
> >>>>the dairy store and leave it out overnight on the stove (the gas stove
> >>>>had a pilot light). It was really thick. I'm a little hazy on the
> >>>>details, as it's been forty years.
> >>>>
> >>>>--
> >>>>Dan Abel
> >>>>[email protected]
> >>>>Petaluma, California, USA
> >>>>
> >>>
> >>>My grandmother and my great-grandmother (different sides of the family)
> >>>both made "soured cream' (aka clotted cream, clabbered cream). They use
> >>>some of it as sour cream, but most of it was used to make butter.
> >>
> >>I've never heard of sour cream used to make butter.
> >>
> >>--
> >>Dan Abel
> >>[email protected]
> >>Petaluma, California, USA
> >>

> >
> >
> > Well, it's not sour cream like you buy in the store. It was "soured" cream
> > or clabbered cream (as my people called it). The cream was left to clabber
> > or "sour" naturally. Today, it would be called "cultured", probably. The
> > finished butter was called "butter". The stuff we buy today in stores is
> > made out of "fresh" cream and is labeled (and was called back then) "Sweet
> > Cream Butter". Sweet Cream butter didn't have the "shelf" life of
> > clabbered cream butter and it doesn't have near the rich, full taste or
> > the golden yellow color.
> >
> > Clabbered cream butter had a bite to it like sour cream (verses heavy
> > cream) or yogurt which are made from a cultured cream not sweet cream.
> > Back in those days, buttermilk was a by-product of clabbered cream butter
> > making and was a much different product than today's buttermilk.
> >
> > Elaine, too
> >

>
>
> Clabbered cream butter was always made from cow's milk. You wouldn't
> want to make it from goat's milk cuz it would taste nasty. (or so I've
> been told.) Goat's milk could be used for sweet cream butter, but you
> had to separate the cream with a mechanical cream separator first
> because it wouldn't separate on it's own.
>
> I dunno why I know this stuff...
>
> Bob
>


hehe, I know what you mean. I should know so much about something I could
actually make some money from.

Yeah, I should have said "cow" somewhere in there. I didn't know that
about goats. Thanks for the info. We never had goats. They weren't very
popular where I have
lived. It would seem that having goats would be, primarily, for the milk -
in farming country. Some of my relatives in the foothills in Arkansas kept
goats because they had wooded land and the goats would keep the underbrush
eaten down. So, the goats gave milk and kept the land clear. In the
lowlands, which was much more open because of the
farming, goats didn't seem to have "a job to do" other than milk
production. So, if one had milk cows, they didn't need goats, too. That
may be totally wrong, but my grandfather always said, "Even the animals
have to earn their keep". And, they did. Everything had a job or a
purpose.

Cows vs. goats may have been a regional or cultural thing, too. Goats are
better suited for some areas than cows are and vice versa.

I've noticed recently on the food network that the chefs use a lot of goat
cheese. It is always light-colored and looks very creamy. The only
experience I ever had was an imported product pronounced Yee Toast (or so
they told me). It was spelled something like Gytost (sorry, it's been 30
years ago now). It was deep gold and hard as a rock. If you hit someone in
the head with a pound of it, you could kill him on the spot. It was really
strong and kind of bitter. (boo, hiss) I thought of it when you described
clabbered milk goat cheese.

Elaine, too