HOT ride today...it almost beat me.

Discussion in 'The Bike Cafe' started by DHinrichs, Jul 16, 2005.

  1. DHinrichs

    DHinrichs New Member

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    Okay, when they say it's not smart to excersize hard in upper '90s weather with high humidity, it's true. 97 deg. here today, but it's Saturday, so I should do a longer ride right? So I set out to do 50 miles not a huge ride but longer than than I usually do. The first 25 miles were not so bad. I was reasonably comfortable and going at a nice speed. It turns out that the hot wind was pushing me along, I chose the WRONG direction to start riding in. My opinion is that you should ride into the wind and fly back with it. So after 25 miles I was HOT and actually stopped and rested a bit. I started off on the next leg of the ride, directly into a stiff wind and it was horrid. Rode very very slowly for the next hour having to drink almost constantly and squirt water all over myself to try and bring my body temp closer to reasonable. I didn't ride many miles in that hour either. After that I could ride only 10 miles at a time then stop and soak myself to try and cool down. Eventually made it home without having to call in support (or an ambulance) but it was not very fun and I was wrung out completely. I would rather ride early in the morning when it is somewhat cooler but I just can't miss the live broadcast of the TdF. One has to have priorities.
     
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  2. Jaguar27

    Jaguar27 New Member

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    Don't worry, you're not alone....I can struggle up Hills and through headwinds but the heat absolutely kills me, the problem is, if I overheat too much I get a pounding headache, overheating and dehydration can also be very dangerous, even deadly...

    I'm British and live in Southern CA where it can get up into the upper 90's and I'm still not aclimatized to very hot weather..on the other Paw, my wife is south American and can ride all day long in high temps...she loves 110 degree Palm Springs weather...I just pant like a Dog...so I think it depends on the individual as to how hot is TOO hot...

    I Tivo the Tour, which means I can ride any time and fast fwd all the adverts...a double benefit!!

     
  3. friedmikey

    friedmikey New Member

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    I know what you mean. Yesterday I was reminded that I don't do too well in the heat either. And it wasn't even as hot as what you rode in! Probably about 90 dry. I was about 70 miles into a century with 7,000 feet of climbing when I ran out of water and Gatorade. I was caught completely unprepared, since I usually don't need to drink more than one bottle of each on even my longest rides. Well this time, I had already gone through 2.5 bottles of water by that point. I knew refreshments were about three miles away, over a hill. It was definitely the closest I have ever come to getting off my bike and walking. I managed to get over the hill at about the slowest I've ever gone and stopped at the country club on the other side for the most expensive water and Gatorade ever... I would gladly have paid 10x as much. There was no way I would have made it the next five miles into the town over another hill.

    Lesson learned! I should have stopped to refill when I knew I had the chance!
     
  4. badhat

    badhat New Member

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    i grew up in las vegas so i'm sort of used to extreme heat, but what ive found for myself is that i'm fine on flats in the heat, but not climbing. mainly i think this is cuz i'm fast enough on the flats (22-25 mph) that i get a nice wind chill cooling, whereas when i hit a hill i immediately feel the heat and start sweating and hurting bad.

    i also hate stopping when its hot. on a 40-50 miler on a hot afternoon i'm likely to not stop at all, cuz when i do, i lose that windchill effect and just start feeling n the heat.
     
  5. PMThor

    PMThor New Member

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    I don't really mind the heat, but the damn humidity totally destroys me. Take today for example. 88F with 90 percent humidity. Did my usual ride nontheless. Now usually they say to take it easier in extreme weather, but I can't. Being a firefighter, I have to fight fires in all type of weather. That's my job. Sooo, I use extreme weather as a time to go for a training ride as to get more acclimated to the heat. It benefits me at work greatly. When other guys are dropping out at a fire, I usually do pretty well. I go through a ton of water on my rides though. I will refill twice on a ride easy sometimes three times even. And I almost always get a headache afterwards. I have tried everything concievable, I just sweat it all out for some reason. In a way though, heat and the humidity is the best thing for me. I am weird like that.
     
  6. saviourag

    saviourag New Member

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    Early in the morning or late in the evening is the answer. But I'm very much used to riding in these conditions, over 90 degrees and extremely high humidity is what we experience for the whole summer season over here. Sometimes it even tops above 105F.. well C'est la vie! When I was younger I used to ride in these temperatures even at noon, at its peak! Nowadays I tend to try to avoid between 11am and 5pm. But if I'm out for a whole day ride, then I only stop for the noon to around 2pm period.
     
  7. nun

    nun New Member

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    Last weekend it was in the 90s and humid in MA and I decided to add 10 miles to my usual 40 mile ride so that i could do my first 50 mile day. Going out was fine, but the extra 10 mile loop I mapped out had a few nasty little climbs and I was feeling them as I started for home. About 5 miles from home I hit the wall and the slightest incline began to feel like a mountain. I reached home feeling like a rag doll.
     
  8. artmichalek

    artmichalek New Member

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    Tape the race and ride early. VT has about the same climate as MN, and by the time my body adjusts to the heat, it's time to watch my breath freeze again. The only way to survive riding in summer here is to get out as early as possible.
     
  9. DHinrichs

    DHinrichs New Member

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    But you made your first 50! That's something. Actually that ride last Sun. was not my hottest ride ever.

    Several years ago, I decided to take my bikes and myself and drive by car to Montana and do some real mountain bike riding. Bicycling magazine had just had an article about how nice Helena was as a base for this kind of riding (and it is) and I had just decided that I couldn't afford to go and bicycle in Scotland on a trip with my brother and his family (they were going by car, I was going to bicycle). So the Montana trip was my alternate. To the story...

    Almost exactly half way from where I live (St. Paul, MN) to Helena is Teddy Roosevelt National Park in N. Dakota. So I drove from here to there and stopped there for a few days of biking in the bad lands. It was really pretty great except that the campground in the park is semi-primitive (no showers) so cleaning up after long rides meant laying down in the shallow bit of river that runs through the park. There is a section of a long hiking/biking trail that runs through the park, it actually starts just south of the park and runs for many many miles up to the Northern half of the T.R.N.P. Funny thing, you can ride horses on the trail in the park but you can't ride a mountain bike on them in the park. There was supposed to be an alternate path around the west side that I decided to try and follow. At first it was a very dusty gravel road, then it degraded to a dirt two track and eventually to a cow path. It was not well marked and I'm not sure if even 5 people had tried to follow this course before I had. The temp was upper 90s but very dry and not a cloud showing. I had a 100 oz. water pack on my back and two 32 oz. water bottles on the bike. It was really a great ride though very dusty. I rode through herds of cattle, several prairie dog towns, accross ravines (of small size). This was not quite bad lands so it was still dry grassland in most spots. I rode what I thought was the trail for 20 miles and got to a spot on the north west corner of the park where the trail I was on disappeared. I could see across the valley a mile or two away to the actual (well marked) trail, but there was a stream between and it and me and I was well more than half way through my water (with no chance for refill before I got back to the start -- well there was one place where a pipe came out of the ground to water cattle but I wasn't sure I could trust it to be suitable for human consumption). I started back and since it was now getting near noon, it was quite hot. I tried to ration my water but was very quickly running out. The only shade I could find other than tiny scrub trees well off the trail was a pick-up truck near an entrance for a foot trail into the park. I layed down under that to try and cool off for a while. I managed to ration my water until just the last 5 miles of the ride back to town. At that point I was back underneath I-90 (it runs through the park) and sat in the shade of the overpass, prostrate on the concrete to try and suck it's coolness into my body. After resting a bit I did the last 5 miles of sheer agony into the town and collapsed in the LBS for about 45 min. I was filthy, caked with dust and rather dehydrated. I drank steadily for the whole time and the guys in the shop were very nice to me (I had stopped in before the ride to get my tires filled with slime on their recommendation before the ride). After recovering I rode another last 8 miles back into the park up and down some big hills.

    That was the hottest and driest I have every been.

    David
     
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