Hot weather + bidon = pondscum

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by cfsmtb, Jan 16, 2007.

  1. cfsmtb

    cfsmtb New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2003
    Messages:
    4,963
    Likes Received:
    0
    A gentle warning from earlier this week folks ... during hot weather especially, please don't leave your beloved bidon to lanquish. By that I mean don't simply keep filling the thing up and *not* taking the time to clean it properly with a rinse or even Milton tablets.

    Things happens, things grow and the result maybe a shiteload of microbes having a party at your expense. I take expecially good care of my 3l hydrapak by placing it (empty) in the freezer while not in use.

    Wish I'd done the same actions with the bidon though. It's not pleasant trying maintain ones dignity in public in 40C+ temps and doing a discreet Bazza McKenzie impersonation behind a park bench. sigh. :D
     
    Tags:


  2. ray

    ray Guest

    cfsmtb wrote:
    > A gentle warning from earlier this week folks ... during hot weather
    > especially, please don't leave your beloved bidon to lanquish. By that
    > I mean don't simply keep filling the thing up and *not* taking the time
    > to clean it properly with a rinse or even Milton tablets.
    >
    > Things happens, things grow and the result maybe a shiteload of
    > microbes having a party at your expense. I take expecially good care of
    > my 3l hydrapak by placing it (empty) in the freezer while not in use.
    >
    > Wish I'd done the same actions with the bidon though. It's not pleasant
    > trying maintain ones dignity in public in 40C+ temps and doing a
    > discreet Bazza McKenzie impersonation behind a park bench. sigh. :D
    >
    >

    Put a sock on it, literally. Find one of your winter socks, turn it
    inside out, and put it over the bottle. Run a tap over the sock cover
    before you go out for a ride. Result: cool, not warm, water in up to 40
    deg heat. Works like an old Coolgardie safe. Simple, free, and
    absolutely guaranteed. Try it.
     
  3. cfsmtb

    cfsmtb New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2003
    Messages:
    4,963
    Likes Received:
    0
    I know about that excellent tip, do sexy Explorer sox do a similar job? :D My problem stemmed from generally being a lazy sod & not cleaning the crap out of the bidon & mouthpiece. Shall pay attention now, with global warming and all that ... ;)
     
  4. ProfTournesol

    ProfTournesol New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2003
    Messages:
    485
    Likes Received:
    0
    now don't forget..put the sock outside the bottle, not inside......:)
     
  5. Blue  Heeler

    Blue Heeler Guest

    ray wrote:

    > >
    > >

    > Put a sock on it, literally. Find one of your winter socks, turn it
    > inside out, and put it over the bottle. Run a tap over the sock cover
    > before you go out for a ride. Result: cool, not warm, water in up to
    > 40 deg heat. Works like an old Coolgardie safe. Simple, free, and
    > absolutely guaranteed. Try it.


    Sadly a waste of time in FNQ - the prevailing 98% humidity means there
    is no effective cooling. I freeze one bottle and put the other in the
    fridge overnight - that way I get about 2 hours of cold/cool water.

    In some ways a better alternative is one of the many light weight
    hydration packs as they tend to be insulated and cold water put into
    them stays cold.

    --
     
  6. cfsmtb

    cfsmtb New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2003
    Messages:
    4,963
    Likes Received:
    0
    Touché, sir, touché. ;)
     
  7. AndrewJ

    AndrewJ Guest

    I can understand it with a hydrapack, but I openly admit that my bidons
    are now at least 10 years
    old and have never been washed. Either this means that the water I'm
    putting in is really, really clean, or that I have fantastic immune
    system or .....

    Yes, maybe it is a good idea to give them an annual wash. On to it :)


    On Jan 17, 1:42 pm, cfsmtb
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    > A gentle warning from earlier this week folks ... during hot weather
    > especially, please don't leave your beloved bidon to lanquish. By that
    > I mean don't simply keep filling the thing up and *not* taking the time
    > to clean it properly with a rinse or even Milton tablets.
    >
    > Things happens, things grow and the result maybe a shiteload of
    > microbes having a party at your expense. I take expecially good care of
    > my 3l hydrapak by placing it (empty) in the freezer while not in use.
    >
    > Wish I'd done the same actions with the bidon though. It's not pleasant
    > trying maintain ones dignity in public in 40C+ temps and doing a
    > discreet Bazza McKenzie impersonation behind a park bench. sigh. :D
    >
    > --
    > cfsmtb
     
  8. matagi

    matagi Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2006
    Messages:
    8,161
    Likes Received:
    122
    If you only ever put water in them, then you're unlikely to have a problem especially if you empty out any water between rides.

    The problem arises if you put other drinks in your bidon because the nice sugary environment is ideal for growing bacteria.

    You can actually buy bottle brushes designed for sports bottles at your local supermarket. If you are in the habit of putting anything other than water in your bidon, then investing in one of these and using it to clean out the bidon every time you put a sweet drink in it, might be a good idea. (using HOT water and soap and rinsing thoroughly)
     
  9. Donga

    Donga Guest

    cfsmtb wrote:
    > Wish I'd done the same actions with the bidon though. It's not pleasant
    > trying maintain ones dignity in public in 40C+ temps and doing a
    > discreet Bazza McKenzie impersonation behind a park bench. sigh. :D


    Post a pic? It must be going around - there's been quite a bit of
    chunder on the bike paths lately. Uni/school holidays = more beer? I've
    managed to dodge it, so far.

    Donga
     
  10. TimC

    TimC Guest

    On 2007-01-17, AndrewJ (aka Bruce)
    was almost, but not quite, entirely unlike tea:
    > I can understand it with a hydrapack, but I openly admit that my bidons
    > are now at least 10 years
    > old and have never been washed. Either this means that the water I'm
    > putting in is really, really clean, or that I have fantastic immune
    > system or .....
    >
    > Yes, maybe it is a good idea to give them an annual wash. On to it :)


    You realise this will be the time you end up getting sick?


    Mine? I wipe the cruft off the mouthpiece occasionally. And I rinse
    them out with dishwater after they have gatorade put in them.

    --
    TimC
    It's funny, isn't it? All this antiterrorist legislation makes ordinary
    law-abiding citizens want to blow up politicians. -- Mark South on ARK
     
  11. rooman

    rooman New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2005
    Messages:
    1,167
    Likes Received:
    0
    One of the benefits in recent years of being a newborn baby to toddler family - I still have the Milton kit and steri stuff to soak bottles in, works a treat....

    and too right about adding sugary stuff to the liquids, plain water is fine, its a nice chemical cocktail already that works on a cast iron gut...but sports drinks and fruit juices can be a problemo after a few days of "school bag treatment"(remembers back when..ugh, furry oranges and all)...

    love the sock thingy, imagine... kids with their drink bottles hanging off their back packs going to school with their soggy footy socks over the outside...hmmm new summer fashion statement! as orstrayyan as corks dangling around the akubra...
     
  12. cfsmtb

    cfsmtb New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2003
    Messages:
    4,963
    Likes Received:
    0
    Classy suggestion mate. :eek:

    And in answer to your question: No.

    Hang on, (remembers a Henry Rollins spoken piece about bodily fluids) Na, not going there...
     
  13. Bean Long

    Bean Long Guest

    ugly verb wrote:

    > my drink bottle (no 'bidon'-the french are c****) has a foul smell of farts.


    I think you got your name wrong... should be "ugly noun". Someone needs
    to keep the dishwater in their bidon! :)

    RE: old water in bidons/bottles... In my line of work I often see fungi
    and/or algae growing in bottles of highly purified water after long
    periods of time, especially if the bottles are clear or "natural" (i.e.
    that sort of opaque white stuff). You'd be surprised what can grow in
    what you would think are extremely clean environments. The clue is
    drain your bottle and let it dry before the next use. A good wash in
    hot water with detergent before drying is obviously a better option.

    --
    Bean

    Remove "yourfinger" before replying
     
  14. AndrewJ

    AndrewJ Guest

    Ah, I think I've worked it out. I only put pure tap water in it. I
    don't want to think about what might grow in Gatorade.

    On Jan 17, 5:28 pm, TimC
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On 2007-01-17, AndrewJ (aka Bruce)
    > was almost, but not quite, entirely unlike tea:
    >
    > > I can understand it with a hydrapack, but I openly admit that my bidons
    > > are now at least 10 years
    > > old and have never been washed. Either this means that the water I'm
    > > putting in is really, really clean, or that I have fantastic immune
    > > system or .....

    >
    > > Yes, maybe it is a good idea to give them an annual wash. On to it :)You realise this will be the time you end up getting sick?

    >
    > Mine? I wipe the cruft off the mouthpiece occasionally. And I rinse
    > them out with dishwater after they have gatorade put in them.
    >
    > --
    > TimC
    > It's funny, isn't it? All this antiterrorist legislation makes ordinary
    > law-abiding citizens want to blow up politicians. -- Mark South on ARK
     
  15. Resound

    Resound Guest

    "matagi" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > If you only ever put water in them, then you're unlikely to have a
    > problem especially if you empty out any water between rides.
    >
    > The problem arises if you put other drinks in your bidon because the
    > nice sugary environment is ideal for growing bacteria.
    >
    > You can actually buy bottle brushes designed for sports bottles at your
    > local supermarket. If you are in the habit of putting anything other
    > than water in your bidon, then investing in one of these and using it
    > to clean out the bidon every time you put a sweet drink in it, might be
    > a good idea. (using HOT water and soap and rinsing thoroughly)
    >

    The last time I washed my bidon with dishwasing detergent, I couldn't get
    rid of the taste of detergent. I sort of killed the taste by rinsing with
    vinegar and hot water a few times but it's still there. Some plastics seem
    to be really good at absorbing odours/tastes.
     
  16. Tamyka Bell

    Tamyka Bell Guest

    Resound wrote:
    >
    > The last time I washed my bidon with dishwasing detergent, I couldn't get
    > rid of the taste of detergent. I sort of killed the taste by rinsing with
    > vinegar and hot water a few times but it's still there. Some plastics seem
    > to be really good at absorbing odours/tastes.


    You sure that was detergent and not Gatorade you were
    tasting? ;)
    T
     
  17. Resound

    Resound Guest

    "Tamyka Bell" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Resound wrote:
    >>
    >> The last time I washed my bidon with dishwasing detergent, I couldn't get
    >> rid of the taste of detergent. I sort of killed the taste by rinsing with
    >> vinegar and hot water a few times but it's still there. Some plastics
    >> seem
    >> to be really good at absorbing odours/tastes.

    >
    > You sure that was detergent and not Gatorade you were
    > tasting? ;)
    > T


    Yep, Gatorade is acidic, detergent is alkaline. Besides, it was lemon
    scented deergent and I don't go for the citrus flavoured Gatorade/Powerade
    with the exception of this odd diet stuff that I didn't intend to grab but
    which was rather pleasantly mandarin flavoured.
     
  18. Tamyka Bell

    Tamyka Bell Guest

    Resound wrote:
    >
    > "Tamyka Bell" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > Resound wrote:
    > >>
    > >> The last time I washed my bidon with dishwasing detergent, I couldn't get
    > >> rid of the taste of detergent. I sort of killed the taste by rinsing with
    > >> vinegar and hot water a few times but it's still there. Some plastics
    > >> seem
    > >> to be really good at absorbing odours/tastes.

    > >
    > > You sure that was detergent and not Gatorade you were
    > > tasting? ;)
    > > T

    >
    > Yep, Gatorade is acidic, detergent is alkaline. Besides, it was lemon
    > scented deergent and I don't go for the citrus flavoured Gatorade/Powerade
    > with the exception of this odd diet stuff that I didn't intend to grab but
    > which was rather pleasantly mandarin flavoured.


    They make diet sports drink? That's crazy!

    Tam
     
  19. Bleve

    Bleve Guest

    Tamyka Bell wrote:

    >
    > They make diet sports drink? That's crazy!


    You find them at the triathelete shops, next to the oxy shots and the
    skinz
     
  20. Shabby

    Shabby New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2003
    Messages:
    617
    Likes Received:
    1
    Standard practice in the food industry is to use a 1% caustic solution (a.k.a. sodium hydroxide, NaoH) at 75 degrees for 20 minutes. Give it a good scrub before and repeat if necessary.... or use dishwasher detergent (not dishwashing detergent) and boiling water and you'll get the same result...

    It won't impart any odours to the bottle, but read the safety precautions if you don;t know what you're doing..
     
Loading...
Loading...