How can I run unattached?

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Comanch09, Dec 26, 2004.

  1. Comanch09

    Comanch09 Guest

    I'm currently in high school, a junior, and was wondering how I can go
    about running unattached from my high school for Track and Field?

    Here is the basic story why I will want to run unattached. I go to a
    different high school currently than the one I went to freshman year.
    My freshman school had a pretty good track team and program, but this
    current school is different. This school track program is mediocre in
    my opinion. The coaches don't know much at all about training for
    track, and the head coach promotes the stealing of sticks/batons from
    my old school, and accomplished doing it twice. Well, because of the
    lack of training I got, my sophomore season didn't go well. I tried to
    train myself, by asking him if I could, at the beginning of the year,
    and he denied my request, saying he would start training "better", or
    something like that soon. That never really ever happened. He did
    something for like a week, which wasn't good at all, and clearly showed
    he didn't know much about training, and then stopped. Around spring
    break, I went back to my old school, and trained with them for a week,
    and got a program, which I followed the later part of the season,
    because, for some reason the coach let me. I just said I got it from
    some coaches, so he let me do it. Again, it was too late, and my
    season paid for it.

    I'm not having it this season, and have three options currently. My
    first option is to get this coach to let me train with my old school
    and run for this school. The second option is to practice under my own
    program at this school and run for this school. The third option is to
    go unattached. I'm questioning the second option, because of my great
    disgust with this guy, if I can get enough meets unattached. And,
    then, at least, I can stop this whole stick stealing easier.

    So my question remains, how can I go unattached, or where can I find
    meets that allow me to go unattached? Is there any websites that you
    know of that have meets that allow unattached runners? I currently
    live in South Carolina, but would mind traveling to another state for
    meets, that is bordering or nearby states to South Carolina. I would
    be grateful for any help anyone is able to provide. Please, I need any
    help I can get. Thanks.
     
    Tags:


  2. >I'm currently in high school, a junior, and was wondering how I can go
    >about running unattached from my high school for Track and Field?


    Man that's EASY! When the gun goes off, just run in the opposite direction of
    everyone else. The coach will "unattach" you personally.
     
  3. Comanch09

    Comanch09 Guest

    FabulustRunner wrote:
    > >I'm currently in high school, a junior, and was wondering how I can

    go
    > >about running unattached from my high school for Track and Field?

    >
    > Man that's EASY! When the gun goes off, just run in the opposite

    direction of
    > everyone else. The coach will "unattach" you personally.


    Real funny, you should be a comedian. In all seriousness though, I
    would like to know only about running unattached, not bad jokes.
    Thanks for any serious responses.
     
  4. On 2004-12-26, Comanch09 <[email protected]> wrote:
    > I'm currently in high school, a junior, and was wondering how I can go
    > about running unattached from my high school for Track and Field?
    >

    [snip]

    You really need to talk to someone local who knows the system -- have
    you talked about this with your old high school coach, for example ?

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi
    http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  5. Comanch09

    Comanch09 Guest

    Donovan Rebbechi wrote:
    > On 2004-12-26, Comanch09 <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > I'm currently in high school, a junior, and was wondering how I can

    go
    > > about running unattached from my high school for Track and Field?
    > >

    > [snip]
    >
    > You really need to talk to someone local who knows the system -- have


    > you talked about this with your old high school coach, for example ?
    >
    > Cheers,
    > --
    > Donovan Rebbechi
    > http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/


    Yeah, he said he would be cool with me practicing with him, and running
    for my current school, if this coach would agree to it. But, if that
    dosn't work out, their is an option about running unattached in classic
    meets in and out of this state, and practicing at my old school. The
    only problem is I'm not positive about how to sign up, etc for those.
    I will look that up this week. I was just curious if anyone knows
    anything else about meets, websites, etc. or just info. on running
    unattached.
     
  6. >Real funny, you should be a comedian.

    I am.

    > In all seriousness though, I
    >would like to know only about running unattached,


    Simple: Stay single.

    > not bad jokes


    Agreed! Luckily mine are great.

    >Thanks for any serious responses.
    >


    You're welcome.
     
  7. Lyndon

    Lyndon Guest

    >
    >Yeah, he said he would be cool with me practicing with him, and running
    >for my current school, if this coach would agree to it. But, if that
    >dosn't work out, their is an option about running unattached in classic
    >meets in and out of this state, and practicing at my old school. The
    >only problem is I'm not positive about how to sign up, etc for those.
    >I will look that up this week. I was just curious if anyone knows
    >anything else about meets, websites, etc. or just info. on running
    >unattached.
    >

    The running for your present school part could be an issue. High school
    athletes using even private coaches/clubs has been done (you might remember
    Julia Stamps), but your PRESENT coach has to go along with it. Without going
    into too much detail, there are issues with your state federation to be
    considered if your present coach doen't go along with it, and if you want to
    run in high school meets. You are not normally allowed to wear a team uniform
    if running unattached or if the meet is not sanctioned by your state federation
    (this doesn't mean that you can't run in an unsanctioned meet, but this gets
    complicated if you are on a team). Many high school (dual) meets do not accept
    individual/unattached entries, but there are some which will accept these. Many
    of the high school invitationals will accept you, but there may be entrance
    standards (marks) that need to be met.

    Dyestat.com has a list of high school track meets, and many of these have meet
    info pages that you can look at. This is where I would start.

    Outside the high school world, you can look at usatf.org, which has a
    searchable calandar (you can select high school, if you want), you can also
    look at the USATF sanctioned meets in your area by going to your local USATF
    association through usatf.org.

    I normally run in NCAA (Div I) meets. For instance, I'm running at the
    University of Washington (indoors, 60m) in about 3 weeks. You can find these
    in your local area by going to the local college or university websites (Univ
    of South Carolina, UNC, Duke, Georgia Tech, etc.), going to track and field
    under athletics and looking through the schedule. Most such meets accept
    unattached entries. There are a few places such as the University of Nevada,
    Reno that actually have a separate high school competition that follows the
    open meet, but in most college/university meets you will be pitted against
    college and open runners.

    If you have more questions, send me an email.

    Lyndon


    "Speed Kills...It kills those that don't have it!" --US Olympic Track Coach
    Brooks Johnson
     
  8. Cathy Weeks

    Cathy Weeks Guest

    Comanch09 wrote:
    > I'm currently in high school, a junior, and was wondering how I can

    go
    > about running unattached from my high school for Track and Field?


    Look, I have zero experience with high-school level Track and Field,
    but I do have a Master's degree in Education and know first hand how
    bad teachers can hold a kid back. That's the bad news. The good news
    is that you CAN take charge of your own education.

    I can't give you advice on running - you'll have to figure that out for
    yourself-- but I can give you a bit of advice dealing with idiot
    teachers.

    Get books on running. Not the overall running books for beginners, but
    get the ones on improving your race times - that sort of thing. Then
    read them, and on your own time, try out the advice, and see what
    works. If I remember correctly from my high school, the track season
    is only a few months out of the year - use the rest of the year to
    train on your own. You'll have to time things carefully to not reach
    your peak at the wrong time, but I'll bet it's doable.

    You can even do some of your training WITH the current coach. When he
    sayd "do a 2-mile warm up", and you have a specific program that you do
    within the 2 miles, then do it then. And if you have very specific
    training schedules that you've put together from books, then show him
    the books, and the shedules and see what he says.

    Do NOT walk in and say "I want to try this program from the book" and
    give him a mumbled synopsis. Instead, walk in with your stack of
    books, with paper clips marking important chapters, and a written- or
    typed-out schedule of training. Include what you'll do during the next
    several workouts - so that it shows both the individual picture (the
    workouts) and the bigger picture (overall training - so he can see the
    progression).

    Be firm but reasonable, and most importantly, NON-CONFRONTATIONAL.
    Don't tell him his training program sucks. Just say, I've done some
    research, and I've been working up to this during the rest of the year,
    and here's what I'd like to do because I think it'll work for me. And
    then give him reasons to believe you (when I started, I ran the mile in
    X minutes, and since then I've shaved X minutes off my time). Show him
    training logs, with times so he can see the improvement.

    Here's the rub: If you can show that your own training schedule WORKS,
    and that you'll be an asset to the team, AND he still looks like he's
    in charge, he'll be more likely to let you run for the team, AND let
    you do your own schedule.

    If he's too much of a jerk, then maybe it's time to go unattached. Or
    bide your time until you're in college.

    Cathy Weeks
     
  9. << Here's the rub: If you can show that your own training schedule WORKS,
    and that you'll be an asset to the team, AND he still looks like he's
    in charge, he'll be more likely to let you run for the team, AND let
    you do your own schedule.

    If he's too much of a jerk, then maybe it's time to go unattached. Or
    bide your time until you're in college.

    Cathy Weeks >>

    Great advice, all the way around!

    _______
    Blog, or dog? Who knows. But if you see my lost pup, please ping me!
    <A
    HREF="http://journals.aol.com/virginiaz/DreamingofLeonardo">http://journal
    s.aol.com/virginiaz/DreamingofLeonardo</A>
     
  10. Comanch09

    Comanch09 Guest

    Thank you Lyndon and Cathy for the information, its definitely helpful.
    Lyndon, I've looked at the USATF.org and didn't find much, but will
    check the other site out for information. Cathy, your advice is really
    helpful, and if I don't go unattached, I'll definitely try some of the
    things you've said. Also, yes, I've been training on the off season,
    since around just after sophomore year ended, and have looked into
    reading, and other things about training since I left my last school.
    I am always learning more, believe I am confident in my own belief on
    how to train and in what I've learned from other coaches, and am
    always looking for ways to improve my training. One of the books I
    recently finished reading was a Charlie Francis book about a month ago,
    just for extra information. I'll check out some of the information you
    guys provided, and might ask for some more advice as I look into this
    stuff. Thanks again for the helpful responses.
     
  11. >Thanks again for the helpful responses.
    >


    You're welcome punk.
     
  12. FabulustRunner wrote:
    > >Real funny, you should be a comedian.

    >
    > I am.


    An unemployed one, and a legend in his own mind:


    > > not bad jokes

    >
    > Agreed! Luckily mine are great.



    Comanch09, others in this group will give you serious
    and useful advice. With your mental maturity (being
    in high school), you should have a great future, while
    FabulustRunner will remain in his kindergarten class
    calling you "punk" when you thank the others for their
    advice. :)

    -- Bob.
     
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