How can i tell the amount of calories i burn while cycling?

Discussion in 'Power Training' started by integrity101, Feb 22, 2016.

  1. maydog

    maydog Well-Known Member

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    In spite of the typos in post #42 (should be cal/minute vs. w/minute.) your calculations are in agreement.
     


  2. erook7878

    erook7878 Member

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    All of this is way over my head. I will concede to what ever it is you are saying. That said, I still stand by the general point that counting calories burned is an ineffective measure for exertion.
     
  3. dkrenik

    dkrenik Member

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    If I had known that was what you were referring to when this whole thing started this would have been a much shorter thread. I completely agree with you on this point.

    Tracking kJ (wor)/Calories has other values (as I stated earlier). I also know several folks (including myself) who track their training volume by work (kJ) done instead of time.
     
  4. TungstenCube

    TungstenCube New Member

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    My favorite tracker is the fitbit. I read an article on Huffington Post a little while back where the author sampled a number of fitness bands and the fitbit was the most reliable, as demonstrated by the industry success that the brand is having. Your best bet is to have the bracelet fit tightly on your wrist during your cycling.
     
  5. Jcycle

    Jcycle Active Member

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    There are a multitude of online calculators. Only trust the ones that factor in your weight and give you some options for the type of ride. maybe compare the results between a few to see if the results are similar. I enter all my food and exercise at sparkpeople and it seems to be pretty accurate.
     
  6. kcj

    kcj New Member

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    HRM would've been recognized as completely useless 30 years ago if only SRM had started down the consumer rather than the research route when PM was first introduced. Give it another 10-15 years and PM will probably be as cheap as HRM today. I got my first HRM in 1990, around $300 in 1990 dollars, and there is no comparison to the $450 PM I got last year. With a PM, I know exactly my limits and how much work I do. With a HRM, I know how fast and number of times my heart beats, period.
     
  7. cyclenthusias44

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    What do you mean?
     
  8. cyclenthusias44

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    Thank you very much for the information.
     
  9. cyclenthusias44

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    Thank you for recommending. I will check it out.
     
  10. Jcycle

    Jcycle Active Member

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    Please, you could have just clicked like instead of posting. What is up with all your consecutive posts and one liners? Are you trying to artificially inflate your post count or something?
     
    dkrenik likes this.
  11. divinemaredi

    divinemaredi New Member

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    That quetion is a good one, I also wonder if there are any gadgets that are more accurate in doing so, or maybe the traditional way of using a scale is still not that much of a problem to track progress...
     
  12. dkrenik

    dkrenik Member

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    When you read through the thread, you'll see that there are a number of tools available for "calories burned" estimation. How much accuracy you need (and budget) determines which way to go for the most part.

    As this is the "Power Training" sub forum, pretty much every PM that I can think of will tell you how many kJ you used in your workout. For the vast majority of the population 1 kJ ≃ 1C (or kc). So there you go.

    Re: Scale. That depends on why you want to track Calories. I track kJ for both weight management and measuring volume of training.
     
  13. lisasian86

    lisasian86 New Member

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    I think there are free online sites that can calculate it for you based on your BMI and the speed and distant you are travelling. I'm sure if you just Google a calorie calculator you would find some useful stuff.
     
  14. kcj

    kcj New Member

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    Human efficiency varies between 22 and 26 percent, P. Pietro, "Cycling on Earth, in Space, on the Moon," European Journal of Applied Physiology 82, 345 (2000). 1 kJ ≃ 1C is a lazy conversion which translates to just under 25% efficiency and only elite athletes have efficiency that high. It works well for the vast majority of the population because it underestimate the calories expended.

    Try Bikecalculator.com or https://sites.google.com/site/compendiumofphysicalactivities/ (but for a more accurate estimate, you will need to read the supporting research publications to see how your activity stack up to how the MET classifications are derived).
     
  15. warrengeb

    warrengeb Member

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    I think it burns around 31 calories per mile if you are riding at very high speed. There are many ways you can calculate the amount of calories you burn while cycling. I have used almost all the ways and I must say that the best way is the wrist watch. There are many wrist watches available that calculates how many calories you burn while cycling. So, I would recommend you those watches.
     
  16. hades_leae

    hades_leae Member

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    I would never recommend trying to count calories burnt because you may not even be physically burning the amount you burn.

    There are instruments out there that calculate calorie burn by the distance you travel, but what about the amount of work you physically put in to get there.

    Those type of instruments don't exist for bikers, those are more of the professional, and custom tools that are expensive because they are proven and perfected to provide real results.

    These average tools in stores don't work by person, but by a fixed algorithm.
     
  17. An old Guy

    An old Guy Member

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    There are a lot of approximations that are close enough for all practical purposes. 1 kJ ≃ 1C is one of those. You might need a better approximation if you want to compare several riders for a scientific paper.

    For the most part people are concerned with calories in compared to calories out. The error in calories in is much larger than this conversion. Calories in is not what you put in your mouth. Calories in is what your body places in your blood stream.
     
  18. Jcycle

    Jcycle Active Member

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    You don't make any sense. There are plenty of devices for the average cyclist and they do calculate individual stats when height, weight, gender, and age are entered. Most devices tend to calculate less than you really burned, not more. It is also easy to use an online calculator to determine the approximate calories burned. Please stop making unfounded assertions. At least make an effort to look like you are a cyclist before posting.
     
  19. kcj

    kcj New Member

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    And I think you meant "[for] the most part people should be concerned with calories in compared to calories out". (?)

    True, the error in the intake or excess intake is the major constraint but a 20% differential or 5% per efficiency percentage point, work = energy expenditure x metabolic efficiency, is not trivial especially if you are on the bike for a few hours at intensity. Like I posted previously, "t works well for the vast majority of the population because it underestimate the calories expended."
     
    #79 kcj, Jul 6, 2016
    Last edited: Jul 6, 2016
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