how do horses train?

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by jobin, Feb 29, 2004.

  1. jobin

    jobin Guest

    hi

    just wondering if anyone knew how race horses are trained? do the jockeys make them do intervals and
    fartleks? LSDs and tempos?

    thanks jobs
     
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  2. Joe Positive

    Joe Positive Guest

    On Mon, 1 Mar 2004 05:38:22 +0000 (UTC),
    [email protected] wrote:

    >just wondering if anyone knew how race horses are trained? do the jockeys make them do intervals
    >and fartleks? LSDs and tempos?

    Remember, they race shorter distances than road racers do; 2 miles is considered a pretty long race
    for thoroughbreds, and even "classic" distances top out at a mile and a quarter. They also run a
    lot faster than people, so maybe this combination makes them more like human sprinters than
    distance runners.

    Maybe they train more like Lyndon than like you or I. I'm fairly sure they don't put in lots of long
    (overdistance) training runs, but it would be cool to find out more.

    Karen
     
  3. Doug Freese

    Doug Freese Guest

    [email protected] wrote:

    > hi
    >
    > just wondering if anyone knew how race horses are trained? do the jockeys make them do intervals
    > and fartleks? LSDs and tempos?

    Good question. My summer 100 mile race is with horses and I never asked. Some finish in front of me
    and many finish after me. I was always amazed how well the horses did in the dark. Unlike us two
    legged toads horses they don't need much or any light. The riders typically wore head lamps so they
    could see the trail markers.

    What I do know is how well they take care of the horses during the race. They have many mandatory
    vet checks where pulse and temps are taken and the horses can not leave until pulse and temp
    stabilize. On hot days a horse may have to stay a half hour.

    I'm sure for the long stuff they have to do long rides but what proportion I haven't any idea. You
    could probably look up ride and tie races and get some ideas. I'll try and ask this year if I'm
    cognizant enough to ask.

    --
    Doug Freese "Caveat Lector" [email protected]
     
  4. Horses do fartleks regardless of wether they're in training, or not. It's from all the
    roughage they eat.
     
  5. Good grief. Isn't this a little like a swimmer asking "how are dolphins trained"?

    <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > hi
    >
    > just wondering if anyone knew how race horses are trained? do the jockeys make them do intervals
    > and fartleks? LSDs and tempos?
    >
    > thanks jobs
     
  6. Jim Johnson

    Jim Johnson Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > hi
    >
    > just wondering if anyone knew how race horses are trained? do the jockeys make them do intervals
    > and fartleks? LSDs and tempos?

    They train much like humans but with different terminology. The most difficult thing is that you
    can't ask a horse how he feels at any given time so you have to be very good at recognizing when
    he's going good or not so good and what might be causing either. Trainers are constantly monitoring
    eating habits, body temperature, stall habits, etc. to get an idea of just how a horse is feeling.
    Some have also started using HRM's and training in specified zones much like humans have been doing
    for years.

    Jim Johnson
     
  7. Amh

    Amh Guest

    [email protected] wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > hi
    >
    > just wondering if anyone knew how race horses are trained? do the jockeys make them do intervals
    > and fartleks? LSDs and tempos?
    >
    > thanks jobs

    If you can find it (aren't you in Europe?) rent the movie "Seabiscuit". The story of a horse who won
    big races in the US in 30's (or maybe 40's). I didn't find the movie to be all that great but there
    were many scenes where the training was shown that I could identify with as a runner. In any case
    both horse and jockey train together. The more the jockey knows about the horse the more the horse
    trusts the jockey and the faster they both go.

    Andy
     
  8. Dot

    Dot Guest

    Doug Freese wrote:

    >
    > What I do know is how well they take care of the horses during the race. They have many mandatory
    > vet checks where pulse and temps are taken and the horses can not leave until pulse and temp
    > stabilize. On hot days a horse may have to stay a half hour.
    >

    This is typical of most races with animals, I think. It sure is for the sled dog races. If you want
    to run long in your next life, be reincarnated as an Iditarod dog ;) They even have booties to
    protect their feet in rough conditions (frequently sewn by volunteers, not running shoe companies),
    get paw massages, etc. There's mandatory vet checks and at least a 24-hr layover anywhere, one 8-hr
    along the Yukon and another 8-hr in White Mountain before the last push (=sprint from here) to Nome.
    Race duration now is generally about 9 days for winner and add 5 or 6 for the red lantern.

    The best mushers are known for their dog care, and the dogs respond accordingly. There's an award
    (Leonhard Seppala Humanitarian award) for the musher that takes the best care of their dogs - as
    voted by vets in Nome after examining dogs. http://www.iditarod.com/veterinary_corner.html

    BTW, since mushers sometimes run behind the sled (not in light running gear or shoes), esp. on
    uphills, some train as runners also - for their own good, but also to learn more about endurance
    training so they can improve how they train their dogs. So I would assume there's a lot of transfer
    in training techniques. But I don't think I've seen any mention of hrm for dogs, like I've seen on
    the Polar website for horses ;)

    Dot that time of year up here :) and the humans started Sat on their own adventure
    http://www.alaskaultrasport.com/RACE%20UPDATES.html

    --
    "Success is different things to different people" -Bernd Heinrich in Racing the Antelope
     
  9. Dan Stumpus

    Dan Stumpus Guest

    I ran into a gal who was an exercise jocky at Santa Anita in LA, and asked her the same question.

    I had suspected they did intervals like human milers do (most horseraces at tracks are less than 1.5
    miles). I was surprised when she said, no, that training horses in shorter distances would cause
    them to let up in a race.

    This contradicts what I learned in the book "Seabiscuit", about horses being quite competitive, and
    not wanting to get beat. Seabiscuit also did lots of 100 yd quick starts in preparation for the
    match race with triple-crown winner War Admiral.

    The jockey said they did longer (1+ mile) workouts, and used such strange terminology, e.g.,
    "breezing" that it was difficult to communicate with her.

    As far as endurance horses go, I have a friend who owns a horse which has won the Tevis Cup (which
    inspired the WS100). I've ridden it, and all I can say is that it's quite a ride to blast up a mile-
    long uphill at a near gallop. He trains not so differently than many ultra runners do--just faster.
    Horses can also keep their conditioning much longer than humans -- after a three weeks in the stall,
    the owner said they don't lose much.

    --Dan

    <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > hi
    >
    > just wondering if anyone knew how race horses are trained? do the jockeys make them do intervals
    > and fartleks? LSDs and tempos?
    >
    > thanks jobs
     
  10. SwStudio

    SwStudio Guest

    "Surf McBrowse" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > Good grief. Isn't this a little like a swimmer asking "how are dolphins trained"?

    I don't know Surf... how many dolphin races occur in your area each year? Ask one of those
    thoroughbred dolphin trainers if their techniques are similar to those used for horse races... that
    would probably be your best bet.

    cheers,
    --
    David (in Hamilton, ON) www.allfalldown.org "The most insecure people are the ones you see, putting
    other people down constantly."
     
  11. jobin

    jobin Guest

    joe positive <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Remember, they race shorter distances than road racers do; 2 miles is considered a pretty long
    > race for thoroughbreds, and even "classic" distances top out at a mile and a quarter.

    actually, i didn't know that. when you watch clips on TV, it seems like the race goes on for a
    long time.

    i checked the web, and apparently, "secretariat" once did 1.5 miles in 2:24. incredible :)

    jobs

    p.s.: btw, karen, i read your marathon report. work had me drowned up to my widow's peak at the
    time. great race, great time. more so, with all that ITB problems you've been having of late.
    good luck in boston.
     
  12. jobin

    jobin Guest

    Doug Freese <[email protected]> wrote: ...
    > Unlike us two legged toads horses they don't need much or any light. The riders typically wore
    > head lamps so they could see the trail markers.

    i guess with those hooves/horseshoes they have, they probably don't get hurt even if they step on
    little unopened pine cones.

    > What I do know is how well they take care of the horses during the race. They have many mandatory
    > vet checks where pulse and temps are taken and the horses can not leave until pulse and temp
    > stabilize. On hot days a horse may have to stay a half hour.

    very interesting.

    > I'm sure for the long stuff they have to do long rides but what proportion I haven't any idea. You
    > could probably look up ride and tie races and get some ideas. I'll try and ask this year if I'm
    > cognizant enough to ask.

    that would be nice.

    jobs
     
  13. jobin

    jobin Guest

    maybe. if they had dolphin races. :)

    jobs

    Surf McBrowse <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Good grief. Isn't this a little like a swimmer asking "how are dolphins trained"?
     
  14. jobin

    jobin Guest

    Jim Johnson <[email protected]> wrote:
    > They train much like humans but with different terminology. The most difficult thing is that you
    > can't ask a horse how he feels at any given time so you have to be very good at recognizing when
    > he's going good or not so good and what might be causing either.

    to some extent, that's probably why we humans have coaches ;-)

    > Trainers are constantly monitoring eating habits, body temperature, stall habits, etc. to get an
    > idea of just how a horse is feeling.

    i found this fascinating bit of info on the web:

    " A horse is a large animal and needs to drink a considerable amount of water. The Manual of
    Horsemanship says: "The body of an adult horse is 60 to 70 per cent water and although a horse can
    lose almost all his body fat and half the body protein and survive; a 20 per cent loss of water can
    prove fatal. As a rough guide, horses drink 27 to 54 litres a day, but may need more in hot
    weather." (19)"

    the full text is at this URL: http://www.viva.org.uk/Viva!%20Campaigns/Horses/horsereport1.htm

    > Some have also started using HRM's and training in specified zones much like humans have been
    > doing for years.

    time for a thread : which is the best HRM for horses? ;-) or (this one for doug) : if i run with a
    horse, will his HRM and my HRM interfere with each other?

    regards jobs
     
  15. jobin

    jobin Guest

    amh <[email protected]> wrote:
    > If you can find it (aren't you in Europe?) rent the movie "Seabiscuit". The story of a horse who
    > won big races in the US in 30's

    actually, i'm in southern california. :)

    coincidentally, i was reading some article about seabiscuit's oscar nomination and since yesterday
    was the oscars ceremony, i was thinking about horses and running and then this thread bolted out of
    my neural gates.

    > (or maybe 40's). I didn't find the movie to be all that great but there were many scenes where the
    > training was shown that I could identify with as a runner. In any case both horse and jockey train
    > together. The more the jockey knows about the horse the more the horse trusts the jockey and the
    > faster they both go.

    thanks for the tip. i guess i'll rent it sometime.

    jobs
     
  16. jobin

    jobin Guest

    Dan Stumpus <[email protected]> wrote: ....
    > This contradicts what I learned in the book "Seabiscuit", about horses being quite competitive,
    > and not wanting to get beat. Seabiscuit also did lots of 100 yd quick starts in preparation for
    > the match race with triple-crown winner War Admiral.

    they look so peaceful when they are grazing. don't look like they would be that competitive. a
    little chihuahua looks more competitive :)

    > The jockey said they did longer (1+ mile) workouts, and used such strange terminology, e.g.,
    > "breezing" that it was difficult to communicate with her.

    heh heh :)

    > As far as endurance horses go, I have a friend who owns a horse which has won the Tevis Cup (which
    > inspired the WS100). I've ridden it, and all I can say is that it's quite a ride to blast up a mile-
    > long uphill at a near gallop.

    for an increased adrenaline rush, try doing it downhill the next time. i once rode one downhill and
    it was a thrill each time it would pick up some (very little) speed. and this was just barely
    trotting speed. i can't imagine galloping down.

    jobs
     
  17. [email protected] wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

    > Jim Johnson <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > Some have also started using HRM's and training in specified zones much like humans have been
    > > doing for years.

    Training horses involves all the same principles as training humans does: periodization,
    specificity, recovery etc.

    For trotters basic endurance could be long 10-12K jogs (or brisk walks) up to four per week,
    strength work would be a few 1200m hill repeats no more then twice per week. Then you´d do heats,
    1-2x 1600-3000m well below race pace, twice per week with maybe an hour of brisk walking or jogging
    on other days. Finally inter- vals, 4-6x 500-700m below race pace, once a week.

    (Race distances are 1600m, 2100m and (not often) 2600m. The 3100m is considered a specialty, an
    event for "stayers".)

    > time for a thread : which is the best HRM for horses? ;-) or (this one for doug) : if i run with a
    > horse, will his HRM and my HRM interfere with each other?

    http://www.horsehrm.com - Polar is the pioneering marketleader here:)

    Anders
     
  18. Amh

    Amh Guest

    [email protected] wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > amh <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > If you can find it (aren't you in Europe?) rent the movie "Seabiscuit". The story of a horse who
    > > won big races in the US in 30's
    >
    > actually, i'm in southern california. :)

    Hmmm, I remember someone with a name similar to yours from Sweden or something like that. He always
    posted about races in KMs through towns with not enough vowels.
    >
    > coincidentally, i was reading some article about seabiscuit's oscar nomination and since yesterday
    > was the oscars ceremony, i was thinking about horses and running and then this thread bolted out
    > of my neural gates.

    Circular logic?

    Andy
     
  19. Joe Positive

    Joe Positive Guest

    On Mon, 1 Mar 2004 22:43:47 +0000 (UTC),
    [email protected] wrote:

    >when you watch clips on TV, it seems like the race goes on for a long time.

    Especially when you've bet the rent money, it can be the longest couple of minutes of your life. But
    after you've watched a bunch of races you'll realize that they generally last long enough for the
    race caller to give you the field order 2 or 3 times, then the "down the stretch they come!" part
    lasts another 10 or 15 seconds and then it's all over.

    >p.s.: btw, karen, i read your marathon report. work had me drowned up to my widow's peak at the
    > time. great race, great time. more so, with all that ITB problems you've been having of late.
    > good luck in boston.

    Thanks. I've got another marathon (Chicago) before Boston, so I'll have some more experience by this
    time next year.

    Karen
     
  20. On Mon, 1 Mar 2004 05:38:22 +0000 (UTC),
    [email protected] wrote:

    >hi
    >
    >just wondering if anyone knew how race horses are trained?

    Sleep on sawdust and eat lots of oats (from Purina, not Quaker).

    >do the jockeys make them do intervals and fartleks? LSDs and tempos?
    >
    >thanks jobs
     
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