how do i carry gear and lock my giro?

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by Bethf, Apr 16, 2003.

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  1. Bethf

    Bethf Guest

    time to start commuting again and at this new job i need to dress nicer. i need to carry some more
    clothes than before, and they aren't going to fit in my cool little yellow bag. Someone said there
    was a pannier rack for the giro - true? Where? And how do i lock the sucker up?
     
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  2. "BethF" skrev...
    > time to start commuting again and at this new job i need to dress nicer. i need to carry some more
    > clothes than before, and they aren't going to fit in my cool little yellow bag. Someone said there
    > was a pannier rack for the giro - true? Where? And how do i lock the sucker up?

    http://www.x-eyed.com/midshipss.html

    And a good chainlock I guess. There was also those bikecuffs that might work with the Giro.

    M.
     
  3. Beth asked:

    > And how do i lock the sucker up?

    In my Kingcycle days - a bike with a similar layout - I would use a U-lock around the steering riser
    to attach it to the scenery. The unorthodox wheel sizes and the need to deflate the front tyre
    before the wheel could be removed kept the wheels free from the advances of the casual tea-leaf.

    Dave Larrington - http://legslarry.crosswinds.net/
    ===========================================================
    Editor - British Human Power Club Newsletter
    http://www.bhpc.org.uk/
    ===========================================================
     
  4. Ben

    Ben New Member

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    Beth,

    Why carry all that? I drive to work occasionally to take clothes I store in my office. I use the back of my door to hang clothes, use a file cabinet drawer for clothes, and another for freshening-up supplies.

    I have a Trek trunk with fold down mini-panniers that does the trick for me.

    http://www.trekbikes.com/accessories/product_detail.jsp?product_id=2384&category_id=102

    I realize that configuration may not work for you, but if you can run a rack on the back, it's a nice alternative to big, clunky pannies. I reserve those for touring.

    Ain't commutin' fun?
    Ben
     
  5. Cletus Lee

    Cletus Lee Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > time to start commuting again and at this new job i need to dress nicer. i need to carry some more
    > clothes than before, and they aren't going to fit in my cool little yellow bag. Someone said there
    > was a pannier rack for the giro - true? Where? And how do i lock the sucker up?

    Beth, I missed the new job part. Still doing CF?

    I lock my Giro by running a cable lock through the rear wheel and between the rear drops (over one
    under the other). John Schlitter suggested running the cable through the opening in one of the
    chainrings. As for racks, X-Eyed is (I believe) shipping the Midship underseat rack for the
    Bacchetta. It bolts to those four tabs under the seat. I have also mounted a RANS HT rear rack on
    my Giro. I think Bacchetta is developing a Bacchetta specific rear rack but the RANS HT rack works
    fine for me.

    This photo is overkill for a commuting set up, but you get the idea.
    http://www.clee.org/Cycling/Giro/Images/20030307GiroPanniers.jpg

    Here are some pics of the HT rear rack mounted on the Giro.
    http://www.clee.org/Cycling/giro/giro.cfm

    BTW don't forget the fenders!!!

    --

    Cletus D. Lee Bacchetta Giro Lightning Voyager http://www.clee.org
    - Bellaire, TX USA -
     
  6. Cletus Lee

    Cletus Lee Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...

    > I realize that configuration may not work for you, but if you can run a rack on the back, it's a
    > nice alternative to big, clunky pannies. I reserve those for touring.

    Underseat panniers are not 'clunky'. In fact, I often find the need to reach down and touch them
    just to reassure my self that they are still there. I also find that my speed is not diminished by
    the extra drag or weight of the panniers. Often I find I only need one. There are no balance
    differences riding with one or a pair. In the winter I used one or two 40L Ortlieb. In the other
    seasons I start the day with two 25L Ortlieb and go home with one of the bags and my clothes inside
    the other.

    > Ain't commutin' fun? Ben

    Best thing I have discovered for maintaining fitness and burning calories.

    --

    Cletus D. Lee Bacchetta Giro Lightning Voyager http://www.clee.org
    - Bellaire, TX USA -
     
  7. One of the disadvantages of using a recumbent reveals itself-----you can't wear a backpack.
    However, some outdoor stores do carry some nice chest packs or belly bags, that might be adequate
    for your needs.

    Steve McDonald
     
  8. Cletus Lee

    Cletus Lee Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    >
    > One of the disadvantages of using a recumbent reveals itself-----you can't wear a backpack.
    > However, some outdoor stores do carry some nice chest packs or belly bags, that might be
    > adequate for your needs.
    >
    > Steve McDonald

    Actually having to wear a backpack is one of the disadvantages of trying to force a typical DF bike
    into utilitarian purposes. No one ever thought of using a backpack before DF manufacturers stopped
    making utility bikes with eyelets for racks. Unless you look very hard for a real touring DF or MTB,
    you will have a difficult time finding a DF suitable for commuting.

    The real disadvantage of commuting with a backpack on a DF is the weight distribution. Bikes handle
    much better when the load is closer to the ground and wheels.

    --

    Cletus D. Lee Bacchetta Giro Lightning Voyager http://www.clee.org
    - Bellaire, TX USA -
     
  9. Mads Hilberg

    Mads Hilberg Guest

    > Unless you look very hard for a real touring DF or MTB, you will have a difficult time
    > finding a DF
    suitable for
    > commuting.

    This varies from country to country. Here (Denmark) DFs suitable for commuting are the most common
    type of bike. They are low maintenance, have a comfortable seating position and various systems for
    carrying bags, breifcases, etc are available at reasonable prices. Of course they still have all the
    normal problems of a DF compared to a recumbent and they are often quite heavy. Such bikes are also
    commonplace in e.g. the Netherlands and Germany. (should "the" in "the Netherlands" start with a
    capital t??)

    > The real disadvantage of commuting with a backpack on a DF is the weight
    distribution. Bikes
    > handle much better when the load is closer to the ground and wheels.

    And let's not forget the shoulder pain that can result from cycling in a leaning-forward position
    with a heavy backpack.

    Beth: I suggest a pannier rack with either panniers or a basket on one side/both sides in which your
    bag/briefcase/whatever can be stowed. Alternatively how about a lockable rear fairing with internal
    storage space?

    Mads
     
  10. B. Sanders

    B. Sanders Guest

    "Cletus Lee" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected]
    > says...
    > >
    > > One of the disadvantages of using a recumbent reveals itself-----you can't wear a backpack.
    > > However, some outdoor stores do carry some nice chest packs or belly bags, that might be
    > > adequate for your needs.

    Really? Belly bags? Chest packs? Wow! I've never seen such beasts. Where should I look?

    > Actually having to wear a backpack is one of the disadvantages of trying
    to force a typical DF
    > bike into utilitarian purposes. No one ever thought of using a backpack
    before DF
    > manufacturers stopped making utility bikes with eyelets for racks.

    Actually, I highly doubt that is true. Backpacks pre-date the invention of cycling by
    several millenia.

    >Unless you look very hard for a real touring DF or MTB, you will have a difficult time finding a DF
    suitable for
    > commuting.

    They're still around; and the good news is that they're quite cheap. Fuji, in particular, makes
    several very nice bikes with STI shifters and rack/fender braze-ons that can be had for $400-500. I
    used to have a 2002 Fuji Finest; but sold it only because I'm getting a new custom Soulcraft DF
    racing bike (my bro'-in-law co-owns Soulcraft). A road bike such as the Fuji Finest is a wonderful
    commuter. There's no need for a "real" touring bike, unless that's what you want. Good ol' dual
    pivot calipers work great.

    > The real disadvantage of commuting with a backpack on a DF is the weight
    distribution. Bikes
    > handle much better when the load is closer to the ground and wheels.

    Balance gets easier as the load is moved higher up. Stability is compromised when backpacks are not
    fastened securely and the load shifts from side to side.

    -Barry
     
  11. Cletus Lee

    Cletus Lee Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > "Cletus Lee" <[email protected]> wrote in message

    > > Actually having to wear a backpack is one of the disadvantages of trying
    > to force a typical DF
    > > bike into utilitarian purposes. No one ever thought of using a backpack
    > before DF
    > > manufacturers stopped making utility bikes with eyelets for racks.
    >
    > Actually, I highly doubt that is true. Backpacks pre-date the invention of cycling by several
    > millenia.

    Backpacks pre-date pack mules too, When you don't have a pack mule you are forced to carry you load
    on your own back. If you ae old enough to remember, people that rode bike for utilitarian purposes
    did not use a backpack. that is whay racks were invented. When DF mfgs made designs that made racks
    impossible, people were forced to revert to a back pack so that they could ride their ultra light
    racing bikes to class.

    > >Unless you look very hard for a real touring DF or MTB, you will have a difficult time
    > >finding a DF
    > suitable for
    > > commuting.
    >
    > They're still around; and the good news is that they're quite cheap. Fuji,

    I did not say that they were unavailable. They're not what your LBS is likely to be pushing.

    > I used to have a 2002 Fuji Finest; but sold it only because I'm getting a new custom Soulcraft DF
    > racing bike...

    Without eyelets for a rack I can presume.

    > > The real disadvantage of commuting with a backpack on a DF is the weight
    > distribution. Bikes
    > > handle much better when the load is closer to the ground and wheels.
    >
    > Balance gets easier as the load is moved higher up. Stability is compromised when backpacks are
    > not fastened securely and the load shifts from side to side.

    Balance is not the issue. I balance a single pannier with no difficulty. I said handling is
    compromised. You will even find this to be true if you load up a Rans seatbag on a Stratus or V-Rex.

    Warm weather makes using a backpack unattractive. And Downright stupid if there are other
    alternatives.

    --

    Cletus D. Lee Bacchetta Giro Lightning Voyager http://www.clee.org
    - Bellaire, TX USA -
     
  12. Cletus Lee

    Cletus Lee Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > > Unless you look very hard for a real touring DF or MTB, you will have a difficult time
    > > finding a DF
    > suitable for
    > > commuting.
    >
    > This varies from country to country. Here (Denmark) DFs suitable for commuting are the most common
    > type of bike. They are low maintenance, have a comfortable seating position and various systems
    > for carrying bags, breifcases, etc are available at reasonable prices. Of course they still have
    > all the normal problems of a DF compared to a recumbent and they are often quite heavy. Such bikes
    > are also commonplace in e.g. the Netherlands and Germany. (should "the" in "the Netherlands" start
    > with a capital t??)

    Yes, Europeans are more sensible whenit comes to practical bike design.

    --

    Cletus D. Lee Bacchetta Giro Lightning Voyager http://www.clee.org
    - Bellaire, TX USA -
     
  13. Greg Dunn

    Greg Dunn Guest

    A Radical Universal bag from Calhoun Cycle carries a lot of stuff, and unlike underseat panniers,
    introduces no additional drag. An additional advantage is that you can take it off your bike (and
    put it back on) in a few seconds - so you can just carry it into the office, with all your stuff.

    I also have an underseat rack from X-Eyed on my V-Rex, and some Arkel panniers (pictures and
    descriptions of everything at http://www.bicyclecommuter.com/VRexCommutingWeapon.htm). The Arkels,
    mounted under the seat, affect the bike balance more favorably than a loaded Radical Universal seat
    bag, because they have a low center of gravity, and the weight is more forward on the bike. They're
    also waterproof. But they do introduce some additional drag.

    One useful thing taught to me by my sister (who used to travel a lot by air) is to roll up clothes
    (especially pants) rather than fold them up. She tells me you can also reduce wrinkles by putting
    tissue (like they put in shirts at the department store), but I've never bothered with that.
    Microfiber pants and knit shirts are great for minimizing wrinkles.

    --
    Greg Dunn

    "BethF" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > time to start commuting again and at this new job i need to dress nicer.
    i
    > need to carry some more clothes than before, and they aren't going to fit
    in
    > my cool little yellow bag. Someone said there was a pannier rack for the giro - true? Where? And
    > how do i lock the sucker up?
     
  14. Greg Dunn

    Greg Dunn Guest

    > Balance gets easier as the load is moved higher up.

    Not in my experience. I have both a Radical Universal seat bag, and Arkel panniers that mount on an
    X-eyed rack under the seat of my V-Rex. The bike handles much better with loaded Arkels on the
    underseat rack than it does with a loaded seat bag. The high center of gravity of the latter makes
    it "swoopy" in turns - i.e., there's an angle of incline where the bike rather suddenly wants to
    fall over. It's still quite manageable, but the underseat load is much better. The tradeoff is
    increased drag.

    --
    Greg Dunn
     
  15. Bethf

    Bethf Guest

    "Mikael Seierup" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "BethF" skrev...
    > > time to start commuting again and at this new job i need to dress nicer.
    i
    > > need to carry some more clothes than before, and they aren't going to
    fit in
    > > my cool little yellow bag. Someone said there was a pannier rack for
    the
    > > giro - true? Where? And how do i lock the sucker up?
    >
    > http://www.x-eyed.com/midshipss.html
    >
    > And a good chainlock I guess. There was also those bikecuffs that might work with the Giro.
    >
    > M.

    Is it really available, or are they lying????
     
  16. Cletus Lee

    Cletus Lee Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >
    > "Mikael Seierup" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > "BethF" skrev...
    > > > time to start commuting again and at this new job i need to dress nicer.
    > i
    > > > need to carry some more clothes than before, and they aren't going to
    > fit in
    > > > my cool little yellow bag. Someone said there was a pannier rack for
    > the
    > > > giro - true? Where? And how do i lock the sucker up?
    > >
    > > http://www.x-eyed.com/midshipss.html
    > >
    > > And a good chainlock I guess. There was also those bikecuffs that might work with the Giro.
    > >
    > > M.
    >
    >
    > Is it really available, or are they lying????
    >

    Is it April yet?

    You might check with your local Bacchetta dealer ;-) to see if they are in stock.

    Cletus D. Lee Bacchetta Giro Lightning Voyager http://www.clee.org
    - Bellaire, TX USA -
     
  17. Bethf

    Bethf Guest

    "Cletus Lee" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > > time to start commuting again and at this new job i need to dress nicer.
    i
    > > need to carry some more clothes than before, and they aren't going to
    fit in
    > > my cool little yellow bag. Someone said there was a pannier rack for
    the
    > > giro - true? Where? And how do i lock the sucker up?
    >
    > Beth, I missed the new job part. Still doing CF?

    Not really, no. Project Management, mostly, but small office so odds and ends too!

    > I lock my Giro by running a cable lock through the rear wheel and between
    the rear drops (over
    > one under the other). John Schlitter suggested running the cable through
    the opening in one of
    > the chainrings. As for racks, X-Eyed is (I believe) shipping the Midship underseat rack
    for the Bacchetta. It
    > bolts to those four tabs under the seat. I have also mounted a RANS HT
    rear rack on my Giro. I
    > think Bacchetta is developing a Bacchetta specific rear rack but the RANS
    HT rack works fine
    > for me.
    >
    > This photo is overkill for a commuting set up, but you get the idea.
    > http://www.clee.org/Cycling/Giro/Images/20030307GiroPanniers.jpg
    >
    > Here are some pics of the HT rear rack mounted on the Giro.
    > http://www.clee.org/Cycling/giro/giro.cfm

    I have a nice trunk for my Trek, if I could mount a trunk rack - I recall you had to make those
    little parts that hold the rack to the seat thingies (stays?, whats a stay?) yourself. Seeing as I
    am mechanically challenged, this might not be viable. Could I do this?

    I have learned to adjust my own brakes.
     
  18. Bethf

    Bethf Guest

    "Greg Dunn" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > A Radical Universal bag from Calhoun Cycle carries a lot of stuff, and unlike underseat panniers,
    > introduces no additional drag. An additional advantage is that you can take it off your bike (and
    > put it back on) in a few seconds - so you can just carry it into the office, with all your
    stuff.

    I have a radical universal and its too big for the giro - drags on the back wheel. Great bag though!

    > I also have an underseat rack from X-Eyed on my V-Rex, and some Arkel panniers (pictures and
    > descriptions of everything at http://www.bicyclecommuter.com/VRexCommutingWeapon.htm). The Arkels,
    > mounted under the seat, affect the bike balance more favorably than a
    loaded
    > Radical Universal seat bag, because they have a low center of gravity, and the weight is more
    > forward on the bike. They're also waterproof. But
    they
    > do introduce some additional drag.

    I have some really nice MEC panniers, which have never been used. If I can mount an x-eyed without
    mod's to the bike this is probably the solution!!!!

    > One useful thing taught to me by my sister (who used to travel a lot by
    air)
    > is to roll up clothes (especially pants) rather than fold them up. She
    tells
    > me you can also reduce wrinkles by putting tissue (like they put in shirts at the department
    > store), but I've never bothered with that. Microfiber pants and knit shirts are great for
    > minimizing wrinkles.

    Smart sister ;-)
     
  19. Bethf

    Bethf Guest

    "Ben" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Beth,
    >
    > Why carry all that? I drive to work occasionally to take clothes I store in my office. I use the
    > back of my door to hang clothes, use a file cabinet drawer for clothes, and another for
    > freshening-up supplies.
    >
    > I have a Trek trunk with fold down mini-panniers that does the trick for me.
    >
    > http://www.trekbikes.com/accessories/product_detail.jsp?product_id=2384- &category_id=102
    >
    > I realize that configuration may not work for you, but if you can run a rack on the back, it's a
    > nice alternative to big, clunky pannies. I reserve those for touring.

    I have a great trunk, but think its a hassle to put a trunk rack on the giro, unless you are handy
    like Cletus Lee.
     
  20. Bethf

    Bethf Guest

    "Dave Larrington" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Beth asked:
    >
    > > And how do i lock the sucker up?
    >
    > In my Kingcycle days - a bike with a similar layout - I would use a U-lock around the steering
    > riser to attach it to the scenery. The unorthodox
    wheel
    > sizes and the need to deflate the front tyre before the wheel could be removed kept the wheels
    > free from the advances of the casual tea-leaf.

    I have to go look at my bike to figure this out - thanks Dave. Planning on parking bike in office
    for now, but will need to lock it sometime.
     
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