How do I get started

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Realdean, Jan 23, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Realdean

    Realdean Guest

    I'm 45, very athletic, currently race motocross but would like to get involved with competitive road
    cycling . I have my race bike, a trainer bike and all the other gear but I have no clue about
    getting started. I do have several questions. Do I need a license or district card saying that I'm
    elligible to race in a certain region? If so, how do I obtain one? What classes are available to me?
    How do I determine my appropraite class? What is the typical format for a day race (distance, time,
    etc)? Any and all responses will be greatly appreciated. Thanks..............dean
     
    Tags:


  2. Tom Kunich

    Tom Kunich Guest

    "realdean" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I'm 45, very athletic, currently race motocross but would like to get involved with competitive
    > road cycling . I have my race bike, a trainer bike and all the other gear but I have no clue about
    > getting started. I do have several questions. Do I need a license or district card saying that I'm
    > elligible to race in a certain region? If so, how do I obtain one? What classes are available to
    > me? How do I determine my appropraite class? What is the typical format for a day race (distance,
    > time, etc)? Any and all responses will be greatly appreciated. Thanks..............dean

    This ain't motocross. You should join a local racing club and get advice from them for your
    specific areas of interest. Much has to be learned though I assume you're already cardio-vascularly
    fit since motocross is one butt-kicking sport. But spinning has to be ingrained and the only way to
    do that is practice.

    There are lots of things that you'll have to learn but some people take to the sport rapidly and
    successfully while others have to work at if for some time to understand it. Don't give up when you
    see a group pull away from you like you're parked and they are in freefall.
     
  3. Jtn

    Jtn Guest

  4. Mike Reed

    Mike Reed Guest

    Go to the bike shop nearest you and ask about group rides. Go on some of these rides and meet
    people. Local clubs may have clinics.

    You'll start off as a Category 5. Road races will usually be around 1 hour long, criteriums (many
    short laps) will be 45 minutes or so. Distance depends on terrain. 24 miles for a Cat 5 road race is
    common. There are exceptions, of course -- usually toward longer races than shorter.

    Here's where you get your license: http://www.usacycling.org/road/

    unless you're in Colorado or some nearby states: http://www.americancycling.org/Default.htm

    -Mike

    [email protected] (realdean) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > I'm 45, very athletic, currently race motocross but would like to get involved with competitive
    > road cycling . I have my race bike, a trainer bike and all the other gear but I have no clue about
    > getting started. I do have several questions. Do I need a license or district card saying that I'm
    > elligible to race in a certain region? If so, how do I obtain one? What classes are available to
    > me? How do I determine my appropraite class? What is the typical format for a day race (distance,
    > time, etc)? Any and all responses will be greatly appreciated. Thanks..............dean
     
  5. Sparhawk

    Sparhawk Guest

    On 6 Jan 2003 20:04:58 -0800, [email protected] (realdean) wrote:

    >I'm 45, very athletic, currently race motocross but would like to get involved with competitive
    >road cycling . I have my race bike, a trainer bike and all the other gear but I have no clue about
    >getting started. I do have several questions. Do I need a license or district card saying that I'm
    >elligible to race in a certain region? If so, how do I obtain one? What classes are available to
    >me? How do I determine my appropraite class? What is the typical format for a day race (distance,
    >time, etc)? Any and all responses will be greatly appreciated. Thanks..............dean

    Dean, "google" bicycle racing, and you will get all of the information that you want.

    This is not a very good newsgroup to get answers to serious questions.

    Sparhawk
     
  6. realdean <[email protected]> wrote:
    : I'm 45, very athletic, currently race motocross but would like to get involved with competitive
    : road cycling . I have my race bike, a trainer bike and all the other gear but I have no clue about
    : getting started. I do have several questions. Do I need a license or district

    A book on bike training like Smart Cycling would answer quite a few of your questions. I'd guess you
    need to establish a training schedule and learn the methods too?

    I'm looking forward to starting racing myself as well, but there are not too many events to go into
    if you ride a recumbent. I wonder how conventional bike racing clubs would view me, at least I'd
    have plenty of things to learn from upright racing folks.

    --
    Risto Varanka | http://www.helsinki.fi/~rvaranka/ varis at no spam please iki fi
     
  7. Jtn

    Jtn Guest

    back in 1987-88 the Kawasaki pro team would use cat 123 races as cross training for a few of their
    riders. they didn't train much and stayed right there with the group in crits in the southeast. the
    pros are all national caliber athletes. if you have ever raced skating method of cross country
    skiing you would know the same feeling as racing a supercross event.
     
  8. Ronde Champ

    Ronde Champ Guest

    "Tom Kunich" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "ronde champ" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > "Tom Kunich" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > >
    > > > This ain't motocross. You should join a local racing club and get
    advice
    > > > from them for your specific areas of interest. Much has to be learned
    > > though
    > > > I assume you're already cardio-vascularly fit since motocross is one butt-kicking sport.
    > >
    > > How is sitting on a motorized bike and going over some whoopdee-doos a "butt-kicking sport"?
    >
    > Back when they were NASA was trying to find out about cardiovascular fitness they outfitted any
    > different kinds of athletes with instrumentation during races. They discovered that motocross was
    > one of the most stressful of all sports. You can take that for whatever it's worth.

    It's not worth much. It's only "stressful" cardiovascularly because the dudes are afraid of crushing
    their nuts when they land. Motocross is no sport.

    Thanks, Ronde Champ
     
  9. Tom Kunich

    Tom Kunich Guest

    "JTN" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > back in 1987-88 the Kawasaki pro team would use cat 123 races as cross training for a few of their
    > riders. they didn't train much and stayed right there with the group in crits in the southeast.
    > the pros are all national caliber athletes. if you have ever raced skating method of cross country
    > skiing you would know the same feeling as racing a supercross event.

    Funny story: I used to race desert and road on motorcycles and I trained for motocross just as it
    was coming into vogue in the US. Although I never raced it I used to ride with guys that were
    winning and I could pass them at any point. That was because when I was in the Air Force I worked
    graveyards and when I got off every day I would go out and do 2-3 hours on the bike in the desert.

    Anyway, being thrown all over the place on a bike you learn to hang on tightly.

    About 10 years ago I was working at Cetus (now Chiron) in Emeryville,
    CA. Engineering had a prototyping machine shop with a half dozen machinists in it. I was walking
    through there at lunch to see the manager and there was no one in the place. As I was walking
    out I spied an 8 lb sledge hammer next to one of the machines. I picked it up and holding the
    bottom of the handle I held it straight out at arms length and dropped the hammer head down and
    touched myself on the chin then lifted it back up vertical. Anyway, I went back to my office
    which was about 100 feet away from the machine shop. About 30 minutes later I heard a lot of
    yelling and laughing out in the machine shop (SOP) which I ignored. The manager came into my
    office and reported that one of the machinists had been sitting behind a machine eating his
    lunch and spotted me doing that and everyone was trying to do it and no one had succeeded and
    several guys had whacked themselves pretty hard.

    That forearm strength is all leftover from racing motorcycles in the 60's. You can imagine what it
    must have been like then.
     
  10. Ronde Champ

    Ronde Champ Guest

    "Tom Kunich" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "JTN" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > back in 1987-88 the Kawasaki pro team would use cat 123 races as cross training for a few of
    > > their riders. they didn't train much and stayed
    right
    > > there with the group in crits in the southeast. the pros are all
    national
    > > caliber athletes. if you have ever raced skating method of cross country skiing you would know
    > > the same feeling as racing a supercross event.
    >
    > Funny story: I used to race desert and road on motorcycles and I trained for motocross just as it
    > was coming into vogue in the US. Although I never raced it I used to ride with guys that were
    > winning and I could pass them at any point. That was because when I was in the Air Force I worked
    > graveyards and when I got off every day I would go out and do 2-3 hours on the bike in the desert.
    >
    > Anyway, being thrown all over the place on a bike you learn to hang on tightly.
    >
    > About 10 years ago I was working at Cetus (now Chiron) in Emeryville,
    > CA. Engineering had a prototyping machine shop with a half dozen machinists in it. I was walking
    > through there at lunch to see the manager and there was no one in the place. As I was walking
    > out I spied an 8 lb sledge hammer next to one of the machines. I picked it up and holding the
    > bottom of the handle I held it straight out at arms length and dropped the hammer head down
    > and touched myself on the chin then lifted it back up vertical. Anyway, I went back to my
    > office which was about 100 feet away from the machine shop. About 30 minutes later I heard a
    > lot of yelling and laughing out in the machine shop (SOP) which I ignored. The manager came
    > into my office and reported that one of the machinists had been sitting behind a machine
    > eating his lunch and spotted me doing that and everyone was trying to do it and no one had
    > succeeded and several guys had whacked themselves pretty hard.
    >
    > That forearm strength is all leftover from racing motorcycles in the 60's. You can imagine what it
    > must have been like then.

    This is the funniest goddam thing I have ever read.

    Thanks, Ronde Champ
     
  11. Ryan Cousineau <[email protected]> wrote:
    : In article <[email protected]>,
    : [email protected] wrote:
    :> I'm looking forward to starting racing myself as well, but there are not too many events to go
    :> into if you ride a recumbent. I wonder how conventional bike racing clubs would view me, at least
    :> I'd have plenty of things to learn from upright racing folks.

    : Alas, you're out of luck in Finland. I'm sure most bike racing clubs would view you as an unwanted
    : freak, though you might convince them to let you in on some training rides if you could
    : demonstrate you weren't a danger to the group.

    One purpose of training is to eliminate all dangers :) In real world, some endurance events - such
    as V├Ątternrundan or Paris-Brest-Paris - allow bents too, so upright racers might encounter bents on
    the road. (They might amount to the odd 1 in a 1000 participants... maybe more in the decades to
    come.) Therefore upright riders could gain a marginal safety benefit from mixed riding. Bents move
    at a different speed than uprights, depending on the terrain, which might be useful to learn to
    understand.

    Guess it doesn't hurt to try and ask, we'll see :-,

    : In the US, things are somewhat different. Recumbents less than 2 m long and with no fairing are
    : legal for USCF Time Trial events. It takes a little tweaking to make a 'bent that short, but there
    : are a couple of low-racer designs available for just this thing.

    I've heard of bent people participating in group rides and pacelines in the Big World. It makes
    little sense for lowracers to join pacelines, but the typical American bents can get a draft from
    upright bikes and vice versa, as I understand.

    Could be nice to make a list of all issues bents might have with upright pacelines. Maybe the bent
    folks have done some thinking on that...

    Of course, not all club activities involve paceline riding. One could organize events,
    participate in time trials or ride on velodromes. I understand some velodromes require fixed
    gear, though. Why is that?

    --
    Risto Varanka | http://www.helsinki.fi/~rvaranka/ varis at no spam please iki fi
     
  12. Howard Kveck

    Howard Kveck Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] (Tom
    Kunich) wrote:

    >
    > About 10 years ago I was working at Cetus (now Chiron) in Emeryville,
    > CA. Engineering had a prototyping machine shop with a half dozen machinists in it. I was walking
    > through there at lunch to see the manager and there was no one in the place. As I was walking
    > out I spied an 8 lb sledge hammer next to one of the machines. I picked it up and holding the
    > bottom of the handle I held it straight out at arms length and dropped the hammer head down
    > and touched myself on the chin then lifted it back up vertical. Anyway, I went back to my
    > office which was about 100 feet away from the machine shop. About 30 minutes later I heard a
    > lot of yelling and laughing out in the machine shop (SOP) which I ignored. The manager came
    > into my office and reported that one of the machinists had been sitting behind a machine
    > eating his lunch and spotted me doing that and everyone was trying to do it and no one had
    > succeeded and several guys had whacked themselves pretty hard.
    >
    > That forearm strength is all leftover from racing motorcycles in the 60's. You can imagine what it
    > must have been like then.

    So did this stunt involve mirrors??? And why was the guy hiding behind his machine? You weren't,
    like, nekkid, were ya? Anyway, I do think that any top level motorcycle racer (on or off road) is
    going to be pretty athletic. I don't know or care about their heart rates, but flinging a 200 to
    400 lb bike around is going to be a workout. Not like curling, but still... (yes, I made fun of
    curling and its status as an olympic, um, sport). We don't need to use sledgehammers at my
    machine shop. And for that, I'm glad. After reading the post above, I'm wracked with indecision.
    Should I be hearing the Rocky theme, "Eye of the Tiger", or the theme from Popeye? Or that old
    fave, the Village People's "Macho Man"?

    --
    tanx, Howard

    remove YOUR SHOES to reply, k?

    For some people, quantity IS quality...
     
  13. Bbc3

    Bbc3 Guest

    "Howard Kveck" wrote:
    > After reading the post above, I'm wracked with indecision. Should I be
    hearing the Rocky theme,
    > "Eye of the Tiger", or the theme from Popeye? Or that old fave, the
    Village People's "Macho Man"?

    Clearly, the Village People's "Macho Man" is appropriate for Colonel Fitts.

    --
    Bill
     
  14. Deeznuts

    Deeznuts Guest

    "ronde champ" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > "Tom Kunich" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > "JTN" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    > > > back in 1987-88 the Kawasaki pro team would use cat 123 races as cross training for a few of
    > > > their riders. they didn't train much and stayed
    > right
    > > > there with the group in crits in the southeast. the pros are all
    > national
    > > > caliber athletes. if you have ever raced skating method of cross country skiing you would know
    > > > the same feeling as racing a supercross event.
    > >
    > > Funny story: I used to race desert and road on motorcycles and I trained for motocross just as
    > > it was coming into vogue in the US. Although I never raced it I used to ride with guys that were
    > > winning and I could pass them at any point. That was because when I was in the Air Force I
    > > worked graveyards and when I got off every day I would go out and do 2-3 hours on the bike in
    > > the desert.
    > >
    > > Anyway, being thrown all over the place on a bike you learn to hang on tightly.
    > >
    > > About 10 years ago I was working at Cetus (now Chiron) in Emeryville,
    > > CA. Engineering had a prototyping machine shop with a half dozen machinists in it. I was walking
    > > through there at lunch to see the manager and there was no one in the place. As I was
    > > walking out I spied an 8 lb sledge hammer next to one of the machines. I picked it up and
    > > holding the bottom of the handle I held it straight out at arms length and dropped the
    > > hammer head down and touched myself on the chin then lifted it back up vertical. Anyway, I
    > > went back to my office which was about 100 feet away from the machine shop. About 30 minutes
    > > later I heard a lot of yelling and laughing out in the machine shop (SOP) which I ignored.
    > > The manager came into my office and reported that one of the machinists had been sitting
    > > behind a machine eating his lunch and spotted me doing that and everyone was trying to do it
    > > and no one had succeeded and several guys had whacked themselves pretty hard.
    > >
    > > That forearm strength is all leftover from racing motorcycles in the 60's. You can imagine what
    > > it must have been like then.
    >
    > This is the funniest goddam thing I have ever read.
    >
    > Thanks, Ronde Champ

    Champ,

    Thanks for directing RBR's attention to a real fucking gem inside of an otherwise shitty thread.
    Kunich is the only reason I read this shitty NG any more.

    Dizzle my Nizzle
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...