How do you drink your tea?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by dee, Feb 1, 2006.

  1. In article
    <[email protected]>,
    Old Mother Ashby <[email protected]> wrote:

    > OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
    >
    > >In article <[email protected]>,
    > > "dee" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >>Hello! How do you like your tea make? Do you enjoy any particular
    > >>differerent style(s) of tea? Do you have milk/sugar/or some other
    > >>weird stuff with it?
    > >>
    > >>Or are you more into the 'other' beverage?
    > >>
    > >>--------------
    > >>
    > >>I like the most common one, just good old red label with milk (whole or
    > >>semi-skimmed), medium strong, 1 sugar, hot temp.
    > >>
    > >>Just now, I had it with single cream, it tasted quite nice.
    > >>
    > >>I also like mocha (hot temp with whipped cream) in cafe, as I like
    > >>someone make it for me...
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>

    > >
    > >Earl Gray's hot, with 1 packet of Splenda and at least 2 tbs. of heavy
    > >cream.
    > >
    > >Or,
    > >
    > >Earl Gray's brewed fresh and strong, then poured over ice to make fresh
    > >brewed iced tea!
    > >
    > >I'll drink that either sweetened or unsweetened, depending on the mood I
    > >am in.
    > >
    > >

    > Cream in Earl Grey!!! Strewth, there's no disputing taste....
    >
    > Christine


    <lol> Mom never took cream in hers, but I really do like it that way, as
    long as it's hot. :)

    Iced, it's plain or slightly sweetened. We've been icing it at work
    lately and I use about 1/4th the sweetner my co-worker does!
    --
    Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     


  2. Goomba38

    Goomba38 Guest

    alsandor wrote:

    > I don't put milk in tea because putting milk in hot beverages forces
    > you to drink them before the milk starts to turn.


    Turns to what??
     
  3. In article <[email protected]>,
    Goomba38 <[email protected]> wrote:

    > alsandor wrote:
    >
    > > I don't put milk in tea because putting milk in hot beverages forces
    > > you to drink them before the milk starts to turn.

    >
    > Turns to what??


    That's what I was wondering...
    I used to sit and play cards with mom and drink hot tea with cream or
    whole milk (or 1/2 and 1/2, whatever was available) and sometimes the
    tea would cool to room temp. before I finished it.

    The milk never "turned" or curdled at all.

    Now if you were to add lemon, that would change things a bit. ;-)
    --
    Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  4. Marie

    Marie Guest

    "dee" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Hello! How do you like your tea make? Do you enjoy any particular
    > differerent style(s) of tea? Do you have milk/sugar/or some other
    > weird stuff with it?


    I drink mine cold w/ lots of sugar. (like 3C sugar per gal.)
    Marie
     
  5. Gabby wrote:
    > "OmManiPadmeOmelet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > Earl gray is treated with Bergamot.
    > > It's a flower essence.


    Thanks, Om. That clears it up. Alway seemed a bit astringent to me.

    > The smell reminded me of
    > walking on the railroad tracks (creosoted railway ties). Then I tasted it.
    > Brought back memories of my dad's habit of making a pot of tea before supper
    > and letting it brew (not steep) on the stove until we'd all eaten. Not tea
    > anymore but I always had ink for my fountain pen. ;o)
    >

    Gabby, what a wonderful memory (although the tea sounds less than
    tasty)! I can almost see your kitchen. :)

    --
    Karen MacInerney
    Kitchen experimenter, family chauffeur, and culinary mystery author
    www.karenmacinerney.com
     
  6. Victor Sack wrote:

    > Where do you live, then? In Europe, Assam teas seem to be available
    > most everywhere. I like Assam, though its maltiness sometimes reminds
    > me of heated ski wax...


    Never tasted heated ski wax... is it good on crackers? ;)

    I'm in the States; Twinings used to carry Assam, but they discontinued
    it ten years ago. My hubby was in the British Store in Houston earlier
    this week -- brought me two big Cadbury bars, but didn't know about the
    Assam. I can probably find it online, come to think of it...

    --
    Karen MacInerney
    Kitchen experimenter, family chauffeur, and culinary mystery author
    www.karenmacinerney.com
     
  7. In article <[email protected]>,
    "Karen MacInerney" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I can probably find it online, come to think of it...
    >
    > --
    > Karen MacInerney


    There s not a lot that cannot be found anymore on the internet... ;-)
    --
    Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  8. alsandor

    alsandor Guest

    Karen MacInerney a écrit :

    > I'm in the States; Twinings used to carry Assam, but they discontinued
    > it ten years ago. My hubby was in the British Store in Houston earlier
    > this week -- brought me two big Cadbury bars, but didn't know about the
    > Assam. I can probably find it online, come to think of it...


    http://www.murchies.com/

    There are five or six teas that are Assam or blends with Assam.
     
  9. "Dee Randall" <[email protected]> writes:

    >> enjoyingtea.com.


    >Thanks for the lovely site.
    >Oh, I would love to have one of the Yixing tea pots. So interesting that
    >they have so many styles - and that serving tray, beautiful, but excessive
    >for my life-style.
    >I'll bet one NEVER washes the Yixing pots? as they absorb, probably?
    >Wondering how that would affect the taste of different teas brewed in them.


    I bet they would be absorbent, but surely a quick rinse with very hot
    clean water would be warranted. I'm not sure, actually.
    We got a ceramic (porcelain, maybe?) set of the pot and four cups,
    Japanese style I believe. Kind of weird since we get Chinese oolong
    tea, but my husband is part Japanese so he likes the aesthetic better.
    It was one of their lesser expensive sets but still pricey, but so worth
    the money. My husband wants a cast-iron set next, but he'll have to
    wait until his birthday. In 2012 ;)

    Stacia
     
  10. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    "Glitter Ninja" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > "Dee Randall" <[email protected]> writes:
    >
    >>> enjoyingtea.com.

    >
    >>Thanks for the lovely site.
    >>Oh, I would love to have one of the Yixing tea pots. So interesting that
    >>they have so many styles - and that serving tray, beautiful, but
    >>excessive
    >>for my life-style.
    >>I'll bet one NEVER washes the Yixing pots? as they absorb, probably?
    >>Wondering how that would affect the taste of different teas brewed in
    >>them.

    >
    > I bet they would be absorbent, but surely a quick rinse with very hot
    > clean water would be warranted. I'm not sure, actually.
    > We got a ceramic (porcelain, maybe?) set of the pot and four cups,
    > Japanese style I believe. Kind of weird since we get Chinese oolong
    > tea, but my husband is part Japanese so he likes the aesthetic better.
    > It was one of their lesser expensive sets but still pricey, but so worth
    > the money. My husband wants a cast-iron set next, but he'll have to
    > wait until his birthday. In 2012 ;)
    >
    > Stacia
    >

    I'm going to have to get a Xixingpot since we're back to drinking tea
    instead of coffee. Although DH will probably say, don't we have enough pots?
    But the teas are mellowing him a bit now.
    I've seen the cast-iron, but I've always wondered how they keep from
    rusting-out. My cast-iron pan that I used with water in it in the oven for
    baking REALLY rusted.
    Thanks a lot,
    Dee Dee
     
  11. dee wrote:
    >
    > Hello! How do you like your tea make? Do you enjoy any particular
    > differerent style(s) of tea? Do you have milk/sugar/or some other
    > weird stuff with it?
    >
    > Or are you more into the 'other' beverage?
    >
    > --------------
    >
    > I like the most common one, just good old red label with milk (whole or
    > semi-skimmed), medium strong, 1 sugar, hot temp.
    >
    > Just now, I had it with single cream, it tasted quite nice.
    >
    > I also like mocha (hot temp with whipped cream) in cafe, as I like
    > someone make it for me...


    I like it straight - no sugar or milk or anything and *especially*
    not lemon (blecch!).

    I like it lightly brewed - not long enough to get bitter.

    My fave is Darjeeling. Years ago I used to drink green tea
    and oolong but haven't drunk them since I discovered really
    good Darjeeling.
     
  12. BoboBonobo

    BoboBonobo Guest

    dee wrote:
    > Hello! How do you like your tea make? Do you enjoy any particular
    > differerent style(s) of tea? Do you have milk/sugar/or some other
    > weird stuff with it?


    Chinese green gunpowder loose tea only costs $8/kilo!
    >
    > Or are you more into the 'other' beverage?
    >
    > --------------
    >
    > I like the most common one, just good old red label with milk (whole or
    > semi-skimmed), medium strong, 1 sugar, hot temp.


    Hot tea with a little Splenda and heavy (double) cream.
    >
    > Just now, I had it with single cream, it tasted quite nice.
    >
    > I also like mocha (hot temp with whipped cream) in cafe, as I like
    > someone make it for me...


    Iced tea with fresh lemon juice and Splenda.

    --Bryan
     
  13. A couple of variations from one with a lifetime of cats...

    One good way to use the masking (or any other large tape) is to wrap in
    around your hand (or anything else I suppose) with the sticky side
    out... a lot of hair can be picked up with that amount of surface area.
    Anything else sticky that won't stain should work, including those
    sheets of adhesive label paper, or smaller individual labels, etc.

    I also bought a thing at Bed Bath and Beyond recently that my son uses
    to get the cat hair and dust off of his black clothes... it cost about
    $8, I think, and is a brush made of many all-rubber bristles on a
    handle.

    Another "wet" thing is a damped washcloth... this is the best way to
    wipe down furniture and bedding too to get rid of allergens for those
    who are allergic.

    Lastly, I like prevention too. Since my cats spend a lot of their day
    on my bed, I place various soft and comfy folded blankets, or towels,
    or even lambskin rings like those from the pet store, on the bed and
    they'll often stay just on those spots.


    Diane B.
     
  14. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    "> I like it straight - no sugar or milk or anything and *especially*
    > not lemon (blecch!).
    >
    > I like it lightly brewed - not long enough to get bitter.
    >
    > My fave is Darjeeling. Years ago I used to drink green tea
    > and oolong but haven't drunk them since I discovered really
    > good Darjeeling.


    But! It's so hard to get 'good' Darjeelilng. I've had expensive Darjeeling
    that tastes no different-ly than inexpensive. I would love to trust buying
    the 'best' just one time. Lots of $$.
    Dee Dee
     
  15. dee

    dee Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > A couple of variations from one with a lifetime of cats...
    >
    > One good way to use the masking (or any other large tape) is to wrap in
    > around your hand (or anything else I suppose) with the sticky side
    > out... a lot of hair can be picked up with that amount of surface area.
    > Anything else sticky that won't stain should work, including those
    > sheets of adhesive label paper, or smaller individual labels, etc.
    >
    > I also bought a thing at Bed Bath and Beyond recently that my son uses
    > to get the cat hair and dust off of his black clothes... it cost about
    > $8, I think, and is a brush made of many all-rubber bristles on a
    > handle.
    >
    > Another "wet" thing is a damped washcloth... this is the best way to
    > wipe down furniture and bedding too to get rid of allergens for those
    > who are allergic.
    >
    > Lastly, I like prevention too. Since my cats spend a lot of their day
    > on my bed, I place various soft and comfy folded blankets, or towels,
    > or even lambskin rings like those from the pet store, on the bed and
    > they'll often stay just on those spots.
    >
    >
    > Diane B.


    Thanks! It's quite a new thing for me. My landlady's son's family-cat
    due to the winter weather like climbing up on my bed to sleep. Cat
    seems to sleep a large proportion of the day. Go out at night for a
    bit, then back to bed, then get up for breakfast, and go to bed, then
    go for supper, then go to bed, and still in very good shape and spirit!
    :-D I was a bit twitchy about all the hair at first. However, I
    enjoy his company, so put a creamy cotton-like paper table cloth on the
    bed. The hair still flies everywhere though, but I am getting used to
    it. Sometimes I find some in my mouth. eee... :)
     
  16. Guest

    I would have never believed it;

    I moved from the Northeast ( soft, "acid" water )
    to the Southwest ( alkaline water )

    What a difference in the taste of brewed tea.
    The alkaline water takes all the "tang" from the tea taste.
    It's like drinking ....dishwater.
    I find myself adding lemon just to restore some of the acidity.

    I'd heard of folks buying bottled water to make tea/coffee.
    Always thought they were "purist nuts".....
    but now
    ????


    On Wed, 01 Feb 2006 17:14:57 -0500, Dave Smith <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >dee wrote:
    >
    >> Hello! How do you like your tea make? Do you enjoy any particular
    >> differerent style(s) of tea? Do you have milk/sugar/or some other
    >> weird stuff with it?

    >
    >I prefer plain tea, no milk or cream or sugar, and not to strong.
    >
    >> Or are you more into the 'other' beverage?

    >
    >I prefer coffee, and on the strong side.
    >
    >


    <rj>
     
  17. [email protected] wrote:

    >A couple of variations from one with a lifetime of cats...
    >
    >One good way to use the masking (or any other large tape) is to wrap in
    >around your hand (or anything else I suppose) with the sticky side
    >out... a lot of hair can be picked up with that amount of surface area.
    > Anything else sticky that won't stain should work, including those
    >sheets of adhesive label paper, or smaller individual labels, etc.
    >
    >I also bought a thing at Bed Bath and Beyond recently that my son uses
    >to get the cat hair and dust off of his black clothes... it cost about
    >$8, I think, and is a brush made of many all-rubber bristles on a
    >handle.
    >
    >Another "wet" thing is a damped washcloth... this is the best way to
    >wipe down furniture and bedding too to get rid of allergens for those
    >who are allergic.
    >
    >Lastly, I like prevention too. Since my cats spend a lot of their day
    >on my bed, I place various soft and comfy folded blankets, or towels,
    >or even lambskin rings like those from the pet store, on the bed and
    >they'll often stay just on those spots.
    >
    >
    >Diane B.
    >
    >
    >

    Just how "often" do they stay? Cats are perverse little creatures,
    they'd rather sit on a clean pillowcase than a nice comfy towel. They
    just know what you don't want them to do...

    Christine
     
  18. On Thu 02 Feb 2006 02:08:17p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it <RJ>?

    >
    > I would have never believed it;
    >
    > I moved from the Northeast ( soft, "acid" water )
    > to the Southwest ( alkaline water )
    >
    > What a difference in the taste of brewed tea.
    > The alkaline water takes all the "tang" from the tea taste.
    > It's like drinking ....dishwater.
    > I find myself adding lemon just to restore some of the acidity.
    >
    > I'd heard of folks buying bottled water to make tea/coffee.
    > Always thought they were "purist nuts".....
    > but now
    > ????
    >
    >
    > On Wed, 01 Feb 2006 17:14:57 -0500, Dave Smith

    <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>dee wrote:
    >>
    >>> Hello! How do you like your tea make? Do you enjoy any particular
    >>> differerent style(s) of tea? Do you have milk/sugar/or some other
    >>> weird stuff with it?

    >>
    >>I prefer plain tea, no milk or cream or sugar, and not to strong.
    >>
    >>> Or are you more into the 'other' beverage?

    >>
    >>I prefer coffee, and on the strong side.


    I discovered something similar when I moved from NE OH to AZ. Nasty stuff!
    I drink iced tea exclusively and use loose tea in an iced tea maker. Not
    only did it taste awful with the AZ water, but it would immediately turn
    cloudy when it hit ice or was chilled in the refrigerator. I had never had
    that happen before moving here. I now use bottled water to make tea,
    coffee, and ice cubes.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright o¿o
    ____________________

    BIOYA
     
  19. > dee wrote:
    >
    >>Hello! How do you like your tea make? Do you enjoy any particular
    >>differerent style(s) of tea? Do you have milk/sugar/or some other
    >>weird stuff with it?


    My English wife has converted me to her style of everyday tea drinking.
    Brewed dark and full-flavored. Milk and sugar for her, milk and Splenda
    for me.

    We have several other kinds of tea, and they're each drunk differently.
    Green tea, plain. Lapsang souchong, a little sugar. Orange spice, a
    little sugar. Irish breakfast, sugar and milk. And it goes on...

    Even things like rooibos or "bush tea" from Africa, a little sugar.
    Herbal "teas" that aren't tea - chrysanthemum, chamomile, etc. Just
    sugar for all of them

    Pastorio
     
  20. In article <[email protected]>,
    "<RJ>" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > I would have never believed it;
    >
    > I moved from the Northeast ( soft, "acid" water )
    > to the Southwest ( alkaline water )
    >
    > What a difference in the taste of brewed tea.
    > The alkaline water takes all the "tang" from the tea taste.
    > It's like drinking ....dishwater.
    > I find myself adding lemon just to restore some of the acidity.
    >
    > I'd heard of folks buying bottled water to make tea/coffee.
    > Always thought they were "purist nuts".....
    > but now
    > ????


    When I make it at work, I use water from the Deionized tap. ;-)

    Makes all the difference in the world!

    At home, I use purified water from the vending machines.
    --
    Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
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