How Do You Eat Spaghetti?



D

Damsel

Guest
When I was a kid, we got boxes of spaghetti that were about 4 inches square
on the ends, and around 3 feet long. The pasta inside was folded in half,
so you were talking strands at least 5-1/2 feet long. One or two were all
that a fork could hold.

We twirled the cooked pasta by holding the tines of our forks against a
soup spoon and twirling.

I die inside, just a little, when I see someone chop their spaghetti into
little pieces. Never could get the hang of twirling against the plate.

How do *you* get 'sketti from the plate to your mouth?

Carol

--
Coming at you live, from beautiful Lake Woebegon
 
I

I-zheet M'drurz

Guest
Damsel spaketh thusly:

> How do *you* get 'sketti from the plate to your mouth?


I don't! Such an incredible pain in the butt! Eating should be
fun, not work lol

That's why God invented shells, springs, ziti, etc. :)



--
_________________________________________
If u are gonna say that I said something,
please say what I REALLY said. ($1 Earl)
 
D

Damsel

Guest
"I-zheet M'drurz" <[email protected]> said:

> Damsel spaketh thusly:
>
> > How do *you* get 'sketti from the plate to your mouth?

>
> I don't! Such an incredible pain in the butt! Eating should be
> fun, not work lol
>
> That's why God invented shells, springs, ziti, etc. :)


So you're not up for a good challenge, huh? LOL!

Carol, who's never before heard of anyone who doesn't eat spaghetti

--
Coming at you live, from beautiful Lake Woebegon
 
W

Wayne Boatwright

Guest
On Sun 26 Jun 2005 09:21:11p, Damsel wrote in rec.food.cooking:

> When I was a kid, we got boxes of spaghetti that were about 4 inches
> square on the ends, and around 3 feet long. The pasta inside was folded
> in half, so you were talking strands at least 5-1/2 feet long. One or
> two were all that a fork could hold.
>
> We twirled the cooked pasta by holding the tines of our forks against a
> soup spoon and twirling.
>
> I die inside, just a little, when I see someone chop their spaghetti
> into little pieces. Never could get the hang of twirling against the
> plate.
>
> How do *you* get 'sketti from the plate to your mouth?
>
> Carol
>


Like you, fork against spoon.

--
Wayne Boatwright *¿*
____________________________________________

Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974


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J

JimLane

Guest
Damsel wrote:

> How do *you* get 'sketti from the plate to your mouth?


SUCK 'EM UP! The only way. Spoons and forks are for polite people, not
spaghetti eaters.


jim
 
B

Bob

Guest
Carol asked:

> We twirled the cooked pasta by holding the tines of our forks against a
> soup spoon and twirling.
>
> I die inside, just a little, when I see someone chop their spaghetti into
> little pieces. Never could get the hang of twirling against the plate.
>
> How do *you* get 'sketti from the plate to your mouth?


I twirl against the plate. This generally results in a ball of pasta
roughly the size of a tennis ball stuck on the end of the fork. I swish the
ball around in the sauce, then elegantly [HA!] bite pieces off the end of
the fork.

The trick to twirling against the plate is to start off with the fork at
about a 45-degree angle to the plate, twirl it a few times, then slowly
bring it to a perpendicular position while twirling.

Bob
 
D

Damsel

Guest
"Bob" <[email protected]_spammer.biz> said:

> I twirl against the plate. This generally results in a ball of pasta
> roughly the size of a tennis ball stuck on the end of the fork. I swish the
> ball around in the sauce, then elegantly [HA!] bite pieces off the end of
> the fork.


Please have someone film this performance, okay? I want to see this!

> The trick to twirling against the plate is to start off with the fork at
> about a 45-degree angle to the plate, twirl it a few times, then slowly
> bring it to a perpendicular position while twirling.


I've tried that, but I still wind up with stray strands of pasta getting
involved with the ones I started out with. :(

Carol

--
Coming at you live, from beautiful Lake Woebegon
 
L

-L.

Guest
Damsel wrote:
> I've tried that, but I still wind up with stray strands of pasta getting
> involved with the ones I started out with. :(
>
> Carol
>
> --
> Coming at you live, from beautiful Lake Woebegon


After you twirl awhile, lean the fork back down and cut the strands.
Then twirl a bit more. You will end up with a tiny plum-sized wad on
the end of the fork - just big enough for your mouth. :)

-L.
(Spaghetti Mastah!)
 
J

Joseph Littleshoes

Guest
Damsel wrote:

> "Bob" <[email protected]_spammer.biz> said:
>
> > I twirl against the plate. This generally results in a ball of

> pasta
> > roughly the size of a tennis ball stuck on the end of the fork. I

> swish the
> > ball around in the sauce, then elegantly [HA!] bite pieces off the

> end of
> > the fork.

>
> Please have someone film this performance, okay? I want to see this!
>
> > The trick to twirling against the plate is to start off with the

> fork at
> > about a 45-degree angle to the plate, twirl it a few times, then

> slowly
> > bring it to a perpendicular position while twirling.


One can of course use the electrical spaghetti fork, the battery
operated, pasta tool. That twirls the pasta for you.

Of course like many an other cultural oddity the 'eating' of 'spaghetti'
(long form Italian pasta) is as much a regional delectation as it is a
universal phenomena.

>
>
> I've tried that, but I still wind up with stray strands of pasta
> getting
> involved with the ones I started out with. :(


There are different forms or shapes of pasta.

One need not feed exclusively on "spaghetti".

Even if your ancestors hail form Naples.

>
>
> Carol
>
> --
> Coming at you live, from beautiful Lake Woebegon



--
---
Joseph Littleshoes
may be consulted at
---
http://finblake.home.mindspring.com/tarotintro.htm
 
D

Damsel

Guest
Joseph Littleshoes <[email protected]> said:

> Damsel wrote:
>
> One can of course use the electrical spaghetti fork, the battery
> operated, pasta tool. That twirls the pasta for you.


There actually exists a gadget like that?? Some people have too much time
on their hands.

> > I still wind up with stray strands of pasta
> > getting involved with the ones I started out with. :(

>
> There are different forms or shapes of pasta.
>
> One need not feed exclusively on "spaghetti".


But, but, but ... I *want* spaghetti!

Carol

--
Coming at you live, from beautiful Lake Woebegon
 
C

Charlie

Guest
Damsel wrote:
> When I was a kid, we got boxes of spaghetti that were about 4 inches square
> on the ends, and around 3 feet long. The pasta inside was folded in half,
> so you were talking strands at least 5-1/2 feet long. One or two were all
> that a fork could hold.
>
> We twirled the cooked pasta by holding the tines of our forks against a
> soup spoon and twirling.
>
> I die inside, just a little, when I see someone chop their spaghetti into
> little pieces. Never could get the hang of twirling against the plate.
>
> How do *you* get 'sketti from the plate to your mouth?
>
> Carol
>

I twirl my spaghetti on using a pitch fork and a snow shovel... :)

Of course, I wash both really well before using.... :)

---Charlie
 
M

Melba's Jammin'

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
[email protected] wrote:

> How do *you* get 'sketti from the plate to your mouth?


> Carol


Twirl on plate. Rob cuts. I cry for pity. (And it's "pasghetti and
meat bulbs" -- did I ever tell you about my Family Circus cartoon?)
--
-Barb, <http://www.jamlady.eboard.com> 6/17/05 Pictures & story
from Notable Women's Dinner at the Governor's Residence.
 
M

Melba's Jammin'

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
[email protected] wrote:

> I've tried that, but I still wind up with stray strands of pasta getting
> involved with the ones I started out with. :(
>
> Carol


Divide and conquer!
--
-Barb, <http://www.jamlady.eboard.com> 6/17/05 Pictures & story
from Notable Women's Dinner at the Governor's Residence.
 
J

jmcquown

Guest
Damsel wrote:
> When I was a kid, we got boxes of spaghetti that were about 4 inches
> square on the ends, and around 3 feet long. The pasta inside was
> folded in half, so you were talking strands at least 5-1/2 feet long.
> One or two were all that a fork could hold.
>
> We twirled the cooked pasta by holding the tines of our forks against
> a soup spoon and twirling.
>
> I die inside, just a little, when I see someone chop their spaghetti
> into little pieces. Never could get the hang of twirling against the
> plate.
>
> How do *you* get 'sketti from the plate to your mouth?
>
> Carol


While I can't say I've ever seen packages of spaghetti such as you describe,
I must confess I break dried spaghetti noodles into 3 equal parts before I
cook them. I find extremely long strands of pasta to be unruly, even with
the help of a spoon. I prefer ziti and small penne pasta for holding a
sauce without requiring elaborate wielding of the knife, fork and spoon. Of
course, lots of freshly grated cheese on the pasta helps, too :)

Jill
 
D

Damsel

Guest
"jmcquown" <[email protected]> said:

> I must confess I break dried spaghetti noodles into 3 equal parts before I
> cook them.


AAAAAAAAAARGH!

> I find extremely long strands of pasta to be unruly, even with
> the help of a spoon. I prefer ziti and small penne pasta for holding a
> sauce without requiring elaborate wielding of the knife, fork and spoon.


Ahh! It's the sauce you're after. I use just barely enough sauce to
lightly coat the pasta.

> Of course, lots of freshly grated cheese on the pasta helps, too :)


Can't argue with that!

Carol

--
Coming at you live, from beautiful Lake Woebegon
 
M

Monsur Fromage du Pollet

Guest
Damsel wrote on 26 Jun 2005 in rec.food.cooking

> How do *you* get 'sketti from the plate to your mouth?
>
> Carol
>
> --
> Coming at you live, from beautiful Lake Woebegon
>


I just twirl it around my fork, spoon isn't required.

--
It's not a question of where he grips it!
It's a simple question of weight ratios!

A five ounce bird could not carry a one pound coconut.

Are you suggesting coconuts migrate?
 
J

jmcquown

Guest
Damsel wrote:
> "jmcquown" <[email protected]> said:
>
>> I must confess I break dried spaghetti noodles into 3 equal parts
>> before I cook them.

>
> AAAAAAAAAARGH!
>
>> I find extremely long strands of pasta to be unruly, even with
>> the help of a spoon. I prefer ziti and small penne pasta for
>> holding a sauce without requiring elaborate wielding of the knife,
>> fork and spoon.

>
> Ahh! It's the sauce you're after. I use just barely enough sauce to
> lightly coat the pasta.
>

This implies I soak the pasta in sauce. Not so. I don't want my pasta
overwhelmed by sauce but I don't want to have to stretch it out across
clotheslines to enjoy it, either! LOL

>> Of course, lots of freshly grated cheese on the pasta helps, too :)

>
> Can't argue with that!
>
> Carol
 
M

Monsur Fromage du Pollet

Guest
Damsel wrote on 27 Jun 2005 in rec.food.cooking

> I've tried that, but I still wind up with stray strands of pasta
> getting involved with the ones I started out with. :(
>
> Carol
>


You select the 1 or 2 strands you want/like. Pick them up between the
tines of the fork. The actual lifting of the strands is sort of a
art...use caution that you lifted no more than 2 strands and that you
have lifted them somewhat NOT too close to a end of the either of
the indivdual strands, but not so far from a end that you get the
dreaded dangler.

Points to Ponder...The Dreaded Dangler...sounds like a radio drama
character from the 30's.

Visualization part of demo: make a fist, put fist on a table
(horizontally)...extend index finger now lay several strands of string
over your index finger...note the clearance from the table top. Now
extend the middle finger and make a twisting motion. Note how well this
would work if your wrist could spin around and around.

While the fork is slightly above the pile (kinda hanging in in the
breeze), there is a definite but slight air space between the selected
strands and the other foods and the plate. You can use just about any
airspace distance you like...but Miss Manners frowns on any distance
higher than 1.75 inches.

Commence twisting! Huston we have a forkful! Works great.

Be sure the twisting motion is fairly brisk but not so brisk that
dinning companions get spattered in sauce, another Miss Manners no no.
This ensures that no battery operated electric drills are operated on
high during your spaghetti dinning experience.

--
It's not a question of where he grips it!
It's a simple question of weight ratios!

A five ounce bird could not carry a one pound coconut.

Are you suggesting coconuts migrate?
 
N

Nancy Young

Guest
"Monsur Fromage du Pollet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Damsel wrote on 26 Jun 2005 in rec.food.cooking
>
>> How do *you* get 'sketti from the plate to your mouth?

>
> I just twirl it around my fork, spoon isn't required.


I'm with you ... just twirl it on the fork, make sure you get
just the right amount and put it in your mouth. One of my
favorite dinners, along with meatballs and hot Italian sausage
(I usually have one or the other at any given meal).

nancy
 
N

Nancy Young

Guest
"Monsur Fromage du Pollet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Damsel wrote on 26 Jun 2005 in rec.food.cooking
>
>> How do *you* get 'sketti from the plate to your mouth?

>
> I just twirl it around my fork, spoon isn't required.


I'm with you ... just twirl it on the fork, make sure you get
just the right amount and put it in your mouth. One of my
favorite dinners, along with meatballs and hot Italian sausage
(I usually have one or the other at any given meal).

nancy