How do you know if a person has the potential or is 'genetically gifted' in cycling?

Discussion in 'The Bike Cafe' started by roger89, Mar 26, 2006.

  1. roger89

    roger89 New Member

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    Helo guys,

    How do you know if a person has the potential or is 'genetically gifted' in cycling? and he will succeed as well.

    A) He starts road biking in a few months and manage to stay in line with a pack of more experienced/advance riders.

    B) Because people say he is, but he still loses in races.

    C) Through training, time will tell.

    Is it spotted in the early training or after some time it will show?

    Which is your say, and how true is that statement?

    If you have another opinion, go ahead and share.

    Thanks.
     
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  2. Bikelux

    Bikelux New Member

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    Parent/s who are former champions or athletic.
    I've seen many cases of this. Parents can pass-on not only the knowledge, skills and encouragement in sports but usually the genetics to boot.
    Just about every good rider I know of had a father/mother/sibling/uncle /grandparent involved in the sport as well.
     
  3. roger89

    roger89 New Member

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    Is Lance' dad a former champion/athlete? Anyway, I don't know who is his father.
     
  4. JTE83

    JTE83 Member

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    Well - the son of Eddy Merck was not a superstar cyclist.
     
  5. PartisanRanger

    PartisanRanger New Member

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    He's still a pro cyclist, though...
     
  6. Rhubarb

    Rhubarb New Member

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    Anyone of the level of Axle Merck is a super star cyclist IMO.
     
  7. Bikelux

    Bikelux New Member

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    You could be Axel's Handicapper if he rocks up at a small club race.

    JTG83: Sorry Axel, you're not a very strong rider mate, not like your old man....OK we'll start you with the D grade vets, just nice and easy pace for you. ;)
     
  8. Madd Dogg

    Madd Dogg New Member

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    I don't really subscribe to the "gift" theory of athletic performance. I beat "gifted" athletes in basketball and cycling through working harder and sheer determination, the gifts that we can all give ourselves.
     
  9. Edoss

    Edoss New Member

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    Yes you tend do get a lot further in sport through training and sheer determination. The gifted sportsmans or women may get an image early that they are the best and may slack at training. Comparing this to ungifted people who will strive to do well and therefore work hard at everything..

    I myself have no gifts.....i'm sh*thouse at everything lol
     
  10. McSpin

    McSpin New Member

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    Maybe, but physical attributes are extremely important to be really good. The very best in all sports, not only have determination, but they are physically gifted for that sport.

    Lance Armstong could train forever, and he would never be a world class discus thrower. He doesn't have the physical gifts. However, his great strength to size ratio, tremendous lung capacity and his body's ability to get rid of lactic acid, makes him physically gifted for cycling. Add in the determination, and you have a great one. Once again, this is true in all sports. Sheer determination and hard work, will only take you so far. Phyiscal attributes that help, are very important in sports.
     
  11. Madd Dogg

    Madd Dogg New Member

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    two words: Pete Rose

    one word: Rudy

    two more words: Mike Singletary

    one more word: Seabiscuit

    Last But not least: Ronde Barber

    It's not the size of the dog in the fight...
     
  12. Ricardo29

    Ricardo29 New Member

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    its a bloody good question really....how do you know what someone's lung capacity and capacity for pain is?? (until you test them that is)

    the only redeeming physical feature you can 'see' on most pro cyclists, is that they are short arsed pygmies who weigh nothing (95% of pro's). bit like formula one drivers, jockeys etc.

    personally believe its rubbish to say hard work will get you to the very top. you have to be gifted with the very very best in athletic abilities, skill, genetics etc, in any sport. then you work your arse off.
     
  13. Edoss

    Edoss New Member

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    Yes i did seem to miss the general point here. I'm sure there are millions of people who try and try again at things but are just not made for it...

    If you have the gifts work the sh*t out of them..
     
  14. PartisanRanger

    PartisanRanger New Member

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    That's a nice idea but it isn't really true, especially in the highest levels of competition. There's a reason why so many NBA ballers have 40'' verticals and cyclists have super-high VO2 Max's... While I agree that determination and practice can get you far, they can't get you to the top.
     
  15. bikeguy

    bikeguy New Member

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    Here's my list:

    high power output
    low to moderate frontal area (low body fat, ectomorphic)
    more mesomorphic but still ectomorphic for sprints
    exceedingly fast metabolism for multi stage road races (6-8000 kcal/ day)
    extreme resistance to muscular breakdown (multi stage road races), no joint problems, little susceptibility to colds or flu, relatively unaffected by extremes of temperature
    good to excellent vision and reactions (definitely for road racing)

    -Bikeguy
     
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