How do you know where to place the cleats?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by cenotouno, Apr 25, 2012.

  1. cenotouno

    cenotouno New Member

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    I always wondered if the cleat position on the shoe's soil is a meter of comfort to power transfer. Is there any method where you can find the best position that basically increase the power transfer which for me is the more important aspect? Any suggestions?
     
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  2. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

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    Cleat positioning is an inexact science. You basically have three parameters--fore-and-aft, side-to-side, and alignment of the toe to the heel.

    Here's how I start. First, for fore-and-aft, you want the ball of the foot behind the big toe to be a bit ahead of the pedal spindle. How much depends on the size of your foot. Small feet, about one centimeter, larger feet, probably two. I just jam the cleat as far back as it goes because my feet are rather large. For side to side, if your feet are narrow, try centering the cleat on the sole. If your feet are wide, you may need to move the cleat to the inside a few millimeters. For most people, as close as they can get to the crank without hitting it works fine. For toe-to-heel alignment, you want the feet generally aimed straight ahead. Everybody's feet and ankles are different, so everybody's idea of straight ahead varies. Mainly, make sure the ankles don't hit the cranks.

    Whatever you do the first time, you'll be making fine adjustments as you grow accustomed. That's why they're fastened with screws or bolts instead of nails.
     
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  3. davereo

    davereo Well-Known Member

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    Once you find the sweet spot grab a nail out of your tool kit and scribe the outline of your cleat onto the bottom of your shoe. Now when its time to replace your cleats you wont have to go through the location process again.
     
  4. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    Some cleats/pedals come with a sticker that is used to mark the location of the cleat for future cleat replacement episodes. Me? I use a silver sharpie to make the outline of the cleat on my shoe sole. No one really sees the bottom of my shoes, so I really don't care how aesthetically pleasing they are or aren't.
     
  5. cenotouno

    cenotouno New Member

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    Thank you all great advices! --- I am here: http://tapatalk.com/map.php?zrhwy3
     
  6. jpr95

    jpr95 Active Member

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    A silver Sharpie marker is what I consider to be part of a basic-to-intermediate home bicycle repair tool set. I keep one in my bicycle tool box--aside from the advice above (great idea, will be doing that soon with my cleats), silver Sharpies are also great for marking a cable housing for cutting. A black Sharpie is also in the box...I hold one against brake calipers when doing a quick-and-dirty rim truing to mark the high spots.
     
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