How do you prep for winter riding?

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Gadget, Nov 1, 2003.

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  1. Gadget

    Gadget Guest

    I'm sure this has come up before and if it has forgive me for rehashing old threads but I'm curious
    to how everyone else prepares or psyches themselves up for the winter.

    Me personally, it involves rummaging in my wardrobe for my winter cycling clothes. As for the bike I
    remove any frame furniture that is unnecessary for winter. Also this process removes the bolts and
    nuts that can rust. Apply adequate protection from the dreaded road salt. Fitting the winter tyres
    also is a big must. On the subject of nuts and bolts rusting in their sockets is there any reason
    why manufactures of frame furniture isn't making them from aluminium.

    Many Thanks

    Gadget
     
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  2. Lee

    Lee Guest

    "Gadget" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I'm sure this has come up before and if it has forgive me for rehashing
    old
    > threads but I'm curious to how everyone else prepares or psyches
    themselves
    > up for the winter.
    >
    As this will be my first commute through the winter my preparation involved posting on here to see
    how good or bad it may be (i enjoyed it yesterday) - the comments here gave me confidence and I dont
    know what I was worrying about!

    > Me personally, it involves rummaging in my wardrobe for my winter cycling clothes. As for the bike
    > I remove any frame furniture that is unnecessary for winter. Also this process removes the bolts
    > and nuts that can rust. Apply adequate protection from the dreaded road salt. Fitting the winter
    > tyres also is a big must. On the subject of nuts and bolts rusting in
    their
    > sockets is there any reason why manufactures of frame furniture isn't
    making
    > them from aluminium.
    >

    Ooh sounds very techy to me - i just pedal and service ;-)
     
  3. Gadget wrote:

    > I'm sure this has come up before and if it has forgive me for rehashing old threads but I'm
    > curious to how everyone else prepares or psyches themselves up for the winter.

    Return lights to bike and more layers of clothing to rider until it stops moaning about frozen
    fingers. Delay haircut. Decline to buy new gloves/socks/shoes/teeth on the grounds that the current
    ones will "last until March".

    Dave Larrington - http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/
    ===========================================================
    Editor - British Human Power Club Newsletter
    http://www.bhpc.org.uk/
    ===========================================================
     
  4. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Gadget wrote:
    > I'm sure this has come up before and if it has forgive me for rehashing old threads but I'm
    > curious to how everyone else prepares or psyches themselves up for the winter.
    >
    > Me personally, it involves rummaging in my wardrobe for my winter cycling clothes.

    Yes, comfortable clothing is the secret - with lots of thin layers. Must admit it's difficult to get
    psyched up when it's cold AND wet, or just very very cold. Clocks going back is a right bummer as
    well for the evenings.

    > As for the bike I remove any frame furniture that is unnecessary for winter.

    Like what?

    > Also this process removes the bolts and nuts that can rust. Apply adequate protection from the
    > dreaded road salt. Fitting the winter tyres also is a big must. On the subject of nuts and bolts
    > rusting in their sockets is there any reason why manufactures of frame furniture isn't making them
    > from aluminium.

    Alumium is crap for bolts, generally. The bolt shafts are nothing like as strong as steel (so can't
    be used for heavy duty applications unless oversized) and there's a high risk of eventually rounding
    the heads off when tightening. Horrible! Aluminium corrodes too anyway. Titanium bolts could be good
    for certain applications - but there's no need just for the sake of normal winter cycling, IMO.
    Steel is real.

    Greasing or antiseizing the threads will prevent seizure, and a bit of surface rust on the outsides
    does no harm. Some nicer quality componentry uses stainless or chromed bolts which will not rust or
    corrode. I think stainless steel is a little weaker than certain other steels so investigate before
    replacing any critical high-load bolts and use reputable brands and suppliers.

    Regular cleaning should help prevent salt eating your bike and storing bike indoors whenever
    possiblle really helps dry up moisture as well.

    ~PB
     
  5. On Tue, 28 Oct 2003 16:29:02 -0000, "Gadget" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I'm sure this has come up before and if it has forgive me for rehashing old threads but I'm curious
    >to how everyone else prepares or psyches themselves up for the winter.
    >

    SNIP

    1. Find all known gloves, hats, waterproofs and overtrousers in house. Dress like Michelin Man
    prepared for bio-war.
    2. Find I forgot to charge light battery from yesterday and curse (again) the scrote that nicked my
    previous bike and SON dynohub.
    3. Have coffee and a fag in the garden to test thermal qualities of selected outfit.
    4. Ride to work and love every minute.

    - don't mind rain; I've got goretex everything except pants.
    - hate wind. (I've heard that in some distant parts of the globe they get 'tailwinds' but not
    round here)
    - pray for snow/sleet and other exciting precipitation.
     
  6. "Gadget" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Me personally, it involves rummaging in my wardrobe for my winter cycling clothes.

    Yep

    > As for the bike I remove any frame furniture that is unnecessary for winter.

    Nah, if anything I need more frame furniture in winter - more gear (warm/waterproof) to carry..

    > Also this process removes the bolts and nuts that can rust. Apply adequate protection from the
    > dreaded road salt.

    Putting them in with anti-seize grease seems to suffice until I need to take them out, could be
    years later. For a while I filled all the heads of my allen bolts with plumbers mait - stops water
    getting in the heads and making unsightly rust spots, and discourages nicking of bits. But I
    stopped bothering with it, since I didn't like having to pick it out myself when I wanted something
    undone, and since dirt tended to stick to it, I decided rust spots probably aren't any worse. Still
    not sure though...

    >Fitting the winter tyres also is a big must.

    Winter tyres? I use the same ones year-round. Just my normal narrow slicks (narrow for MTB rims at
    any rate, 1").

    >On the subject of nuts and bolts rusting in their sockets is there any reason why manufactures of
    >frame furniture isn't
    making
    > them from aluminium.
    >

    You can get them but you can't do them up tight for fear of stripping the threads. Stainless steel
    is best, or I guess titanium, if you can find them, at a price. Main thing is to use antiseize
    grease before installing and not over tightening. Stainless self-locking nuts are good - they won't
    loosen off even if not tightened up (too) hard.

    Rich
     
  7. Simon Mason

    Simon Mason Guest

  8. Gadget wrote:

    > I'm sure this has come up before and if it has forgive me for rehashing old threads but I'm
    > curious to how everyone else prepares or psyches themselves up for the winter.

    I've sent the nice frames off for a respray so I don't ride them!
     
  9. Pete Whelan

    Pete Whelan Guest

    Gadget wrote:
    > I'm sure this has come up before and if it has forgive me for rehashing old threads but I'm
    > curious to how everyone else prepares or psyches themselves up for the winter.
    >
    > Me personally, it involves rummaging in my wardrobe for my winter cycling clothes. As for the bike
    > I remove any frame furniture that is unnecessary for winter. Also this process removes the bolts
    > and nuts that can rust. Apply adequate protection from the dreaded road salt. Fitting the winter
    > tyres also is a big must. On the subject of nuts and bolts rusting in their sockets is there any
    > reason why manufactures of frame furniture isn't making them from aluminium.
    >
    > Many Thanks
    >
    > Gadget
    >
    >

    get winter bike off hooks, clean and polish summer bike and hang on hooks

    --
    Pete

    interchange 12 for 21 to reply
     
  10. Drinky

    Drinky Guest

    > As this will be my first commute through the winter my preparation
    involved
    > posting on here to see how good or bad it may be (i enjoyed it
    yesterday) -
    > the comments here gave me confidence and I dont know what I was worrying about!

    Wait until it rains!
     
  11. Gadget

    Gadget Guest

    storing
    > bike indoors whenever possiblle really helps dry up moisture as well.
    >
    > ~PB

    Not a chance. No space in my flat. I have had to store it in there in past but only because the
    outside storage area was built up with loft debris from a recent conversion. Also the room that was
    used to store it hadn't been developed into what it is now.

    Gadget
     
  12. On Tue, 28 Oct 2003 16:47:26 -0000, "Lee"
    <[email protected]com> wrote:

    >
    >"Gadget" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]...
    >> I'm sure this has come up before and if it has forgive me for rehashing
    >old
    >> threads but I'm curious to how everyone else prepares or psyches
    >themselves
    >> up for the winter.
    >>
    >As this will be my first commute through the winter my preparation involved posting on here to see
    >how good or bad it may be (i enjoyed it yesterday) - the comments here gave me confidence and I
    >dont know what I was worrying about!
    >
    >
    >> Me personally, it involves rummaging in my wardrobe for my winter cycling clothes. As for the
    >> bike I remove any frame furniture that is unnecessary for winter. Also this process removes the
    >> bolts and nuts that can rust. Apply adequate protection from the dreaded road salt. Fitting the
    >> winter tyres also is a big must. On the subject of nuts and bolts rusting in
    >their
    >> sockets is there any reason why manufactures of frame furniture isn't
    >making
    >> them from aluminium.
    >>
    >
    >Ooh sounds very techy to me - i just pedal and service ;-)

    I just pedal.
     
  13. Mark McN

    Mark McN Guest

    Reply to [Not Responding]
    > pray for snow/sleet and other exciting precipitation
    >

    I remember last year, doing a supermarket run one evening, and finding that it was snowing when I
    came out. It was magical! I cycled home the long way, panniers bulging with groceries, just to
    savour the faint crunch of snow, the beauty of clean white roads, and the peace and quiet
    - all the cars seemed to have been frightened away.

    Mind you, if there's as much black ice around this winter as there was last year, I'll take it as a
    sign from G*d or Bob Dixon that I *really* ought to get that Windcheetah.

    --
    Mark, UK If you believe the doctors, nothing is wholesome; if you believe the theologians, nothing
    is innocent; if you believe the military, nothing is safe. -Lord Salisbury (1830-1903)
     
  14. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

  15. Lee

    Lee Guest

    "Drinky" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > As this will be my first commute through the winter my preparation
    > involved
    > > posting on here to see how good or bad it may be (i enjoyed it
    > yesterday) -
    > > the comments here gave me confidence and I dont know what I was worrying about!
    >
    > Wait until it rains!
    >
    >

    been there, done that! Ive been lucky and only had the odd one or 2 showers but i suppose when it
    gets colder and rains, then it will test my mettle!
     
  16. Tony W

    Tony W Guest

    "[Not Responding]" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:b2ntpv8tjckf2r1mtvg[email protected]...

    > >
    > >Ooh sounds very techy to me - i just pedal and service ;-)
    >
    > I just pedal.

    Slap some proofhide on the saddle, stuff a Tesco bag & lassy band (sorry, water proof saddle
    cover and retaining device) under said saddle, spray GT85 at various bits, spray some chain lub
    at the chain.

    Dig out warmer kit & waterproofs.

    Fit lights.

    All the above is a once only event. Then:-

    Pedal.
     
  17. "Pete Biggs" <pbiggmellon{remove_fruit}[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > > http://www.bicyclinglife.com/Recreation/wintercycling.htm
    >
    > "It is only when temperatures dip to below Zero (F), (-20C) that being warm enough requires
    > some planning. Even then, most winter cyclists keep right on riding until -20F and some to
    > -40F."
    >
    > Yeah right!!!!!
    >

    Yebbut, he lives in Alaska so he probably doesn't even notice it being cold until gets to
    around -20.

    I also noticed the bit about studded tyres. Maybe that's what they OP meant when he talked about
    putting on his 'winter tyres' ;-).

    Rich
     
  18. Simon Mason

    Simon Mason Guest

  19. Arthur Clune

    Arthur Clune Guest

    > "It is only when temperatures dip to below Zero (F), (-20C) that being
    :> warm enough requires some planning. Even then, most winter cyclists keep right on riding until
    :> -20F and some to -40F."

    : Yeah right!!!!! ~PB

    (opps, I lost the atribution lines. Sorry Pete B and whoever posted the above).

    I've found from personal experience that when it gets down to -8C or -10C I start to find I need
    more than just jeans on for commuting (thermal long johns under work well). Down to about -5C or so
    I find that (for short distance commutes only mind) boots, jeans and a couple of jumpers under a
    jacket work fine for me. Adjust temperture with gloves/scarfs/hats.

    Arthur

    --
    Arthur Clune http://www.clune.org "Technolibertarians make a philosophy out of a personality defect"
    - Paulina Borsook
     
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