How DO you pronounce "monocoque"??



hd reynolds

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Nov 15, 2005
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bobbyOCR said:
I don't understand the logic in the French language, no matter how hard you try to pronounce one of their words which you have not seen before, it always ends up wrong. they also use an unnecessary amount of letters.
EG) English: Bow
French: Beaux
same pronounciation
I guess if you ask 3 Frenchmen you get 4 different ways to pronounce French words the French way.

Virenque (as in Richard Virenque).. you'll get...
v-rengk
or
v-rongk
or
v-rank
 

artemidorus

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Mar 10, 2004
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mikesbytes said:
+1

Now if the French (Normans) had never taken england, we would still be using the Saxon language.
And if the Saxons had never taken Britain, we would still be speaking Welsh (although it wouldn't be called "Welsh", which is Saxon).
 

artemidorus

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The French say " ...oque" with a vowel that is halfway between the "o" of (non-American) "****" and the the "o" of "coke", which is why this argument has been so drawn out.
 

melslur

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Oct 31, 2005
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I agree with mono-****, for North America at least. Regarding the French pronunciation, that's a dicey one. Just because a word is from French, it is not necessarily pronounced the same way: in cycling, the two most obvious examples are chamois and derailleur. Sometimes the pronunciation stays close, and sometimes it veers way off.
 

rdk

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Aug 21, 2005
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Acutally I vote for mono-****. My wife is French speaking (from Belgium) and thats what she said when I showed her.
 

willocrew

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May 27, 2006
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fauxpas said:
ffs, its ****!!! with a capital K



Monocoque (French for "single shell") is a construction technique that uses the external skin of an object to support some or most of the load on the structure. This stands in contrast with using an internal framework (or truss) that is then covered with a non-load-bearing skin. Monocoque construction was first widely used in aircraft, starting in the 1930s
Hey fauxpas, easy on the excitement mate :D

Yea I always pronounced it as KOCK and most of the cyclists i know do it too. But now after hearing that recording, i'm going to start saying:

MONE NURRH COKE.
 

artemidorus

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willocrew said:
Hey fauxpas, easy on the excitement mate :D

Yea I always pronounced it as KOCK and most of the cyclists i know do it too. But now after hearing that recording, i'm going to start saying:

MONE NURRH COKE.
That recording is the American version - it doesn't sound at all like that from a French person.
 

fauxpas

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May 20, 2006
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Mwhahaha...

I am Portuguese, and the pronunciations between Portugal, Macau (used to be a Portuguese Provence near Hong Kong) and Brasil vary greatly. When I toured Portugal, I had to keep saying 'What?" cause they sounded so different.



Even the Spanish have different pronunciations depending on the region of Spain. I remember the famous tenor, Placido Domingo telling David Letterman at least 3 different ways to pronounce his name.



Don't even get me started on the asians...



But us, here, debating how to pronounce monocoque is funny as hell. The frogs themselves probably have 2+ correct ways. In cooking, there are many French words and phrases used and I have worked with many euro chefs and they all pronounce them their own way...



So until Napoleon is resurrected and puts my head under a guillotine, its mono **** for mine...


viva la france!