How do you train for hill when you have none?

Discussion in 'Cycling Training' started by basso97, Jun 29, 2005.

  1. RapDaddyo

    RapDaddyo Active Member

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    What you basically need is a way to simulate the resistance of a 6+% grade. You can do that with a trainer, and without elevating the front wheel. It's easier with a power meter, but you could use a HR monitor and increase resistance until your HR gets to 85+% of max at a cadence of 75-90 which is likely to be your climbing cadence.
     


  2. frenchyge

    frenchyge New Member

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    Optional for you, along with the goggles, boots, and "DR. M" skin suit. :D
     
  3. limerickman

    limerickman Moderator

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    Rap & Basso :

    I had no idea that the topography was as pan flat as that !

    Today, i cycled 60 miles to a couple of 10% climbs that last 4 miles each.
    I am just looking at my notes here as I write : my cadence average on these climbs was 59rpm, using 42x23/25 (42x25 is my lowest gear on the inner ring).
    Practically standstill.

    I'm just thinking aloud here : but to replicate this low cadence (on the flat) I would have to use a 53x13 minimum (and even this gear is too light to replicate the cadence that I was using today).

    Maybe doing intervals using a very big gear, with huge cadence might replicate hill climbs ?
    Just a thought.
     
  4. RapDaddyo

    RapDaddyo Active Member

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    We have some great climbs. You can go West and there's a nice climb at Red Rock National Park (I did that today). You can go East and climb out from Hoover Dam to Boulder City. It's not quite Reno, but we have some good climbs. And good sprints, too. I like going down Las Vegas Blvd. at 6:30am and drag racing the garbage trucks as they clean up from the night before.
     
  5. RapDaddyo

    RapDaddyo Active Member

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    frenchyge, after you've tamed Colorado, come out here next year for the Death Ride. I'm not ready for it this year, but am planning on riding it next year.
    http://www.deathride.com/
     
  6. frenchyge

    frenchyge New Member

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    I don't think it's as important to be cadence specific with the training. All you need is to hustle up to the ~300W (rider dependent, of course) range for 10-20 minutes, and that's not too hard to accomplish just riding on the hoods on a flat road.
     
  7. RapDaddyo

    RapDaddyo Active Member

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    I agree with you, but for whatever reason I find it infinitely easier to do with a nice, long hill to climb. Maybe it's psychological, but I just find it easier to get my power number goals on climbs.
     
  8. frenchyge

    frenchyge New Member

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    Wow! That looks awesome! :eek: I'm only getting 120mi and 10.3K feet of lung busting climbing this year, but if 3 passes are good then 5 would surely be better.

    I have family in San Diego, and that would be a great trip for next year. Is there organized support (ie, with SAG stops and food) or is it all self-supported? Thanks for that link, but my wife is probably going to hate you for it. :D
     
  9. RapDaddyo

    RapDaddyo Active Member

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    I haven't ridden it, but a weekend riding buddy rode it the last 2 years (he didn't finish the first year, but he made it all the way last year) and is planning to ride it this year. I'll ask him about the support. I do know that they close many of the roads! Pretty cool, huh?
     
  10. limerickman

    limerickman Moderator

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    300 watts !
    That's impressive.

    me ? I'm just an old bloke reduced to long distance stuff, these days.
    The people who know about these things tell me that I'm a 250watt man.
    For 5 hours plus, rides.

    I stick to the old miles per hour : 17-19mph is my average speed for a 5 hour
    session, over rolling terrain.
     
  11. DanP

    DanP New Member

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    Two things I guess:

    1) Cool idea on the baby trailer thing, at least for me in flat Florida, and where my regular loop 99% of the time has a predictable SE wind.

    2) Not knowing your finances - (again living in flat FL) I bought a Computrainer a couple of months ago and have been doing one of their hill programs... it is just amazing stuff.

    I'm talking > minute gains so far in formal (short) events.

    I suppose it boils down to training to put down the power for a given time period - the head wind runs were ok but the ability to do that in a computrainer at will really nailed it for me.
     
  12. Lonnie Utah

    Lonnie Utah Banned

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    And don't forget about UT, we have some topography here too! :D

    http://fermi.jhuapl.edu/states/maps1/ut.gif
     
  13. HoWheels

    HoWheels New Member

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  14. frenchyge

    frenchyge New Member

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    That's about right. You'd hustle up to ~300W and work hard for 10-20 minutes as part of an interval workout, then slow back down and rest for several minutes before doing it all over again. I wasn't saying that would be steady state power (although it might well be for some people).

    Those are some pretty respectable 5-hr numbers.
     
  15. Carrera

    Carrera New Member

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    Could you maybe hop on a train with the bike and travel out to the hills in an hours time? Here they let you put bikes on the train during off-peak hours.
    If you can't do that you need to either relocate or turn your hand to sprinting on the flat.

     
  16. basso97

    basso97 New Member

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    The closes Hills of any size are about 175 miles from my home. The RTA ( trains) does not go that far. I thank everyone for their sugestions, but getting to hills on a regular basis is not pratical I am not traveling 6 hours in my car every weekend.

     
  17. cduan

    cduan New Member

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    i moved from boulder colorado to boston over a year ago. i still don't know where to go for a decent climb without having to drive for over an hour. i'd appreciate if guys in boston area can give me a few pointers..

     
  18. RapDaddyo

    RapDaddyo Active Member

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    You're very fortunate. I think the Boston area is one of the world's great cycling areas. Of course, you're surrounded by beautiful, rolling terrain. If you want long climbs, I'd head into NH (the road to Peterborough, if I recall correctly). You can even get in a pretty good workout right around Boston, including the famous Belmont Hill (I climbed it every day), although not the 10-mile steady grade climbs. And, although it's a car trip, you've got Vermont and Maine close at hand. There are some awesome climbs in VT and ME. I loved riding out of Boston. A really beautiful, albeit flat, route is to go up to Marblehead and do a few loops around the island. Great harbor. The Cape is also great for cycling, albeit fairly flat. Check with the Northeast Cycling Club. http://www.northeastbicycleclub.org/home/ That's a racing club and they might have some rides posted on their website. Also check with the LBS Wheelworks. http://www.wheelworks.com/ It's the bike shop of a former riding buddy. Of course, all this talk of great hills to climb is just pouring salt in the wound for poor old Basso97. Sorry, Basso.
     
  19. RapDaddyo

    RapDaddyo Active Member

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    Hey frenchyge, I rode with my friend (Mike) today who has ridden the Death Ride. I asked him about the support, etc. He said that the stops and support were the best of any ride he has ever done. Apparently, the ride is a major fund raising event for the local communities (fire, police, local charities), and each puts on a SAG stop, with all the usual stuff plus sandwiches, soups and showers! I guess the communities try to out-do each other. And, as I mentioned before, they close most of the roads for the event. He also said that he has done the CO Triple Bypass and that he thinks the Death Ride is "much harder." He has been going out to Mt. Charleston near LV once a week to practice (6K feet of non-stop climbing). We did a 40 mile route today that I designed ("Climbers Delight") and he was motoring up the climbs at 300w+ so I think he is getting in pretty good shape. Sounds pretty brutal to me. I'm not ready for it this year, but maybe next year. Good luck in your CO event. Have a good ride and be safe. Paul
     
  20. basso97

    basso97 New Member

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    I went out this last weekend and did the power type drills, and then I road my recumbent tandem on the 4th, I have the power at duration.

    From ridding the 2 bike over the same hills I think my problem is gearing. On my road bike I did not have low enough gearing. My lowest gear was a 36-23. I think if I get a 27 on the back I can spin up the hills.

    Thank everyone for the help.
     
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