How do you wash your bike after a ride?

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by VipFREAK, Aug 11, 2003.

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How do you wash your bike after a ride?

  1. Low pressure water

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  2. Compressed air

    102 vote(s)
    45.1%
  3. Wipe my bike

    9 vote(s)
    4.0%
  4. Other (please reply with details)

    98 vote(s)
    43.4%
  5. None

    17 vote(s)
    7.5%
  1. bikehawk5

    bikehawk5 New Member

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    A few times when the muck was too thick for a cloth & a bucket of water to do the job,i've taken off the wheels & ran it under my shower while using a cloth.
     


  2. SilentGTboy

    SilentGTboy New Member

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    I hosed my new bike down and the next morning It was orange all over the place. Meh, rust. I hopped on it an took it out into some mud and shallow pond water, parked in back in the garage and The rust was gone. Next morning I went back into the garage and put on a BIG grin. Nothing say you use it more then a layer of dirt. I do oil important parts.
     
  3. BLDR

    BLDR New Member

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    I use a hose on the frame and a rag on the componentry. If I wanna be real thorough (did I spell that wrong?) then I get a tooth brush to get into the cluster and other hard to reach places.

    I hate cleaning my bike after a long ride but if you still wanna have it in a year or two then you have to.
     
  4. formicalinoleum

    formicalinoleum New Member

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    Once the dit/mud has dried, I wipe off what I can with a dry cloth. I mostly focus on cleaning the chain/cassette/chainrings and making sure my clipless pedals are free of chunks of dirt. I spray my chain and cassette liberally with degreaser, then take a toothbrush to them. Once I have finished scrubbing, I rinse it all off with with water from a water bottle, let it dry, and lube it all up. Then I go out and get it dirty all over again!
     
  5. jhuskey

    jhuskey Moderator

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    I'll let you know if I ever do wash it.
     
  6. Hardtail

    Hardtail New Member

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    I wipe it with a rag and degreaser.
     
  7. ABogoni

    ABogoni New Member

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    I can't remember the last time I actually cleaning my bike. I guess riding in the rain would do the job for me, especially when it's been poring for hours.
     
  8. kardon2

    kardon2 New Member

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    i ususally do it when i get back from a ride. i use a hose and dry it off. ill stop that...
     
  9. dh_devil

    dh_devil New Member

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    i never use any water at all. i just use a dry cloth. then polish her
     
  10. Mehrdad Wieske

    Mehrdad Wieske New Member

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    The only environmentally save and also very easy and effective way that i experienced is:

    Car Wash !!!
     
  11. gruppo

    gruppo New Member

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    Pledge Wipes.
     
  12. Juba

    Juba New Member

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    Ususally I just ensure the drivetrain is clean, a little mud on the frame gives a bike character. But when I do wash the bike:

    -Take my stand outside into the backyard, pop the bike on the stand and take the wheels off the bike.

    -Get a bucket of soapy water (dish soap), and a few different sized plastic scrub brushes that I bought at the grocery store. Get my degreasing spray, cog bush and an old toothbrush as well.

    -Pre-soak the bike and wheels using the soaker setting from my garden hose, which has nearly 0 water pressure. Spray the drivetrain parts and pedals with degreaser.

    -Let the bike sit a few minutes.

    -Start scrubbing the wheels with the plastic scrub brush using the soapy water. Use the cog bush to clean the cassette, adding degreaser as required. Rinse the wheels off using the soaker setting (again, no water pressure) on my garden hose. Set the wheels aside to dry.

    -Start scrubbing the frame with the scrub brush and soapy water. I do the front half of the bike, then rinse with the soaker setting. Then the back half and rinse. It is easier to really scrub the frame when the wheels are off the bike. Use the toothbrush to clean the drivetrain parts and pedals.

    -Put the wheels back on the bike. Spray WD-40 on the chain, cassette and pedals, then wipe most of it off with a towel. Before anyone gets their panties in a knot about WD-40, keep reading. WD-40 chases away the water, then almost completely evaporates, leaving a very light slick residue, which helps prevent mud build up, especially on the cassette.

    -Let the bike dry for a couple hours.

    -Go back and lubricate with a serious lubricant. For normal riding conditions here, I go with a wax for the derailluer pivot points and the moving parts on my pedals. Cross-country lube for the chain. Work a little Prep-M grease into the seals of the fork and rear shock, and wipe the excess away. Drop of Phil's Tenacious Oil on the exposed cables, then shift through the gears to work the oil into the housing a bit, then wipe the excess away. If it is muddier then usual here, then cross-country lube instead of the wax for the derailleurs and pedals, and I sometimes even go as far as to put on a very light coat of no-stick cooking spray (no-name Pam) on the downtube, chainstays, seat stays and lower legs on my fork.

    -Start to finish takes about 60 minutes of work (less the 2 hours inbetween where I let the bike dry).

    Cheers,
    Juba
     
  13. neil0502

    neil0502 New Member

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  14. MountainPro

    MountainPro New Member

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    some good ole' H2O...just a sprinlke out of my garden hose to get rid of the mud then a quick dry and lube with some generic teflon lubricant..

    maybe once a month i will give it a thorough clean...(take a toothbrush to the chain and cogs)

    thats it.
     
  15. MountainPro

    MountainPro New Member

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    who needs to cycle when you get a solid workout just cleaning your bike!!!

    just kidding mate.. :)

     
  16. shieldsy

    shieldsy New Member

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  17. J1S

    J1S New Member

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    if you truly want 0 water pressure spray using the mist setting on a hose add on.
     
  18. kleinrider

    kleinrider New Member

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    This is what I do as well (per recommendation by my LBS). All three of my bikes are cleaned this way and the newest is 9 1/2 years old.

    I highly recommend the stuff; works great for me!
     
  19. fondriest

    fondriest New Member

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    A few tips i have picked up

    Washing up liquid is bad - it makes your paint or polish finish very dull

    Pressure washers are bad - water will get into suspension parts and bearings

    Tooth brushes are good - for cleaning chains and spd`s and any other fidlly bits

    A petrol/oil mix is good - for cleaning chain and chain rings

    Washing up liquid is bad - it will reduce the stopping power and life expectancy of disc brake pads
     
  20. Conniebiker

    Conniebiker New Member

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    Step 1: When it is clean to start with, Wax it. Thoroughly, like a tuner's first car. Armor-all the tires.
    Step 2: Apply dirt while riding vigorously. Warm water preferred.

    Step 3: Rinse with hose. Step 2 should rinse easily.

    Step 4: Let dry then buff dust off. Repeat step one till perfectly shiny again.:cool:
     
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