How far...

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Sebastian Ovett, Mar 10, 2004.

  1. Carlos Jones

    Carlos Jones Guest

    On Wed, 10 Mar 2004 19:00:51 +0000 (UTC), Donovan Rebbechi
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >There's an old story about the philosophy department at the
    >university of Melbourne where I studied for my
    >undergraduate degree (I don't know if it's truth or
    >legend). The philosophy department had apparently given
    >identical questions on an exam paper in consecutive years,
    >and were called on it.

    I have family in Melbourne, though they're incomers, being
    from Casterton in Victoria originally. They hate it,
    Melbourne, that is.

    >Their response was "yes, but the answers are different
    >this year".

    Given the academic and scientific worlds propensity for
    coming up with new 'truths' every half hour, that seems a
    reasonable response.

    >Sometimes I tire of Occam's razor and grow some stubble.

    Occam's been bought out by Gillette, didn't you know?

    >Not averse, just lazy.

    Treadmills can do that to a guy.
     


  2. Bpitt

    Bpitt Guest

    However far it is to the dinner table.
     
  3. Leo

    Leo Guest

    Just so long as each and every person believes as you
    believe, adheres to your understanding of the universe,
    worships and hangs upon your every word.

    >
    > Does that sound elitist? Sorry, I'm actually an inclusive-sort-of-
    > guy at heart.
     
  4. Carlos Jones

    Carlos Jones Guest

    On Wed, 10 Mar 2004 21:07:57 GMT, Leo <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Just so long as each and every person believes as you
    >believe, adheres to your understanding of the universe,
    >worships and hangs upon your every word.

    I have, my little friend, via the sweat of my brow and the
    labour of my brain and hands, *earned* the right to adopt
    this haughty position. When - indeed if - you too earn that
    right, I'll be mighty interested to see whether you adopt a
    more magnanimous stance.
     
  5. Onemarathon

    Onemarathon Guest

    In article <%[email protected]>,
    "SwStudio" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Sebastian Ovett" <[email protected]>
    > wrote in message
    > > ...do you have to run to be happy?
    >
    > If I'm doing a longer-type run, I find (as many do) I fall
    > into agroove about 35 - 40 minutes into it. I guess you
    > could call this "happy". It certainly feels great.
    >
    > cheers,

    me too. occasionally, if i'm not feeling too well
    physically, i'll cut it back to 30 min., and that can feel
    ok, and i'll feel better mentally and physically afterwards.
    but normally, i hit the happy place around 35
    min. and after that it's just a matter of my running goal
    for the day.

    Cam
     
  6. Swstudio

    Swstudio Guest

    "onemarathon" <[email protected]> wrote in
    message
    > In article <%[email protected]>,
    > "SwStudio" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > "Sebastian Ovett" <[email protected]
    > > days.co.uk> wrote in
    message
    > > > ...do you have to run to be happy?
    > >
    > > If I'm doing a longer-type run, I find (as many do) I
    > > fall into agroove about 35 - 40 minutes into it. I guess
    > > you could call this "happy". It certainly feels great.
    > >
    > > cheers,
    >
    > me too. occasionally, if i'm not feeling too well
    > physically, i'll cut it back to 30 min., and that can feel
    > ok, and i'll feel better mentally and physically
    > afterwards. but normally, i hit the happy place around 35
    > min. and after that it's just a matter of my running goal
    > for the day.

    Yeah, it happens very quickly for me, when it does... it's
    like my form has been making all these micro adjustments for
    half an hour and suddenly you find that "sweet spot" where
    you feel like you are floating.

    I've discussed this with a friend while on a run one
    day - he thinks the feeling has it's origin is heart
    rate stabilization once your body shifts to primarily
    fat burning.

    cheers,
    --
    David (in Hamilton, ON) www.allfalldown.org "The most
    insecure people are the ones you see, putting other people
    down constantly."
     
  7. Miss-G-

    Miss-G- Guest

    All country people hate Melbourne. All my friends are from
    Portland and hate it here. I love Melbourne but I've lived
    here all my life.

    Thanks Miss-G-

    "Carlos Jones" <[email protected]>
    wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Wed, 10 Mar 2004 19:00:51 +0000 (UTC), Donovan Rebbechi
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >There's an old story about the philosophy department at
    > >the university of Melbourne where I studied for my
    > >undergraduate degree (I don't know if
    it's
    > >truth or legend). The philosophy department had
    > >apparently given
    identical
    > >questions on an exam paper in consecutive years, and were
    > >called on it.
    >
    > I have family in Melbourne, though they're incomers, being
    > from Casterton in Victoria originally. They hate it,
    > Melbourne, that is.
    >
    > >Their response was "yes, but the answers are different
    > >this year".
    >
    > Given the academic and scientific worlds propensity for
    > coming up with new 'truths' every half hour, that seems a
    > reasonable response.
    >
    > >Sometimes I tire of Occam's razor and grow some stubble.
    >
    > Occam's been bought out by Gillette, didn't you know?
    >
    > >Not averse, just lazy.
    >
    > Treadmills can do that to a guy.
     
  8. Carlos Jones

    Carlos Jones Guest

    On Thu, 11 Mar 2004 05:24:11 GMT, "Miss-G-"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >All country people hate Melbourne. All my friends are from
    >Portland and hate it here. I love Melbourne but I've lived
    >here all my life.

    Why are people like that? I was born in the heart of a UK
    city, lived for my early years on an lemon farming estate in
    rural Rhodesia (Zimbabwe to you youngsters) and have had
    homes everywhere from Rome to wildest Scotland.

    I mean, you can't let a place *define* you, anymore than you
    can *be* you job. If you try hard enough you can find
    something to love about every place you've ever lived. If
    you do find a city intolerable, then leave, don't moan.

    I've never been to Oz, though it's high on my list of places
    to visit, especially as I have a son who's obsessed with the
    strange little animals that inhabit your land. Trouble is,
    my cousin is dying of MS somewhere in a Melbourne nursing
    home and I fear I'd get sucked into the whole 'supportive
    family' routine when I've never even met the guy before. I
    mean, he's gonna die anyway and I can't see him giving a
    shit about whether he see me before he pops his clogs, so
    we'd both end up being incredibly brave and supportive when,
    in reality, we'd both rather be with someone else, doing
    something else.

    Anyway, all I want to see in Oz-land is the desert. So, go
    on, tell me about the desert. Make me so jealous I go
    searching on the 'net for a cheap ticket :)
     
  9. In article <%[email protected]>, Miss-G- wrote:
    > All country people hate Melbourne. All my friends are from
    > Portland and hate it here. I love Melbourne but I've lived
    > here all my life.

    I grew up in bushland outside Melbourne (near a big national
    park), but I spent a few years in Melbourne and like it. But
    that doesn't alter the fact that what you're saying is
    essentially true -- some people just don't like city life,
    especially if it's not what they're used to.

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  10. Amh

    Amh Guest

    Sebastian Ovett <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > ...do you have to run to be happy?

    Don't care as long as I'm out there running. Quantifying it
    would be an impossible task.

    Andy
     
  11. Rick++

    Rick++ Guest

    > ...do you have to run to be happy?

    I stand still, but the earth moves backwards under my feet!
     
  12. Drlith

    Drlith Guest

    "Carlos Jones" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Thu, 11 Mar 2004 05:24:11 GMT, "Miss-G-"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >All country people hate Melbourne. All my friends are
    > >from Portland and hate it here. I love Melbourne but I've
    > >lived here all my life.
    >
    > Why are people like that? I was born in the heart of a UK
    > city, lived for my early years on an lemon farming estate
    > in rural Rhodesia (Zimbabwe to you youngsters) and have
    > had homes everywhere from Rome to wildest Scotland.

    Do you have a British accent, or Rhodesian? Had a friend in
    grad school who was white Rhodesian and had the prettiest
    accent--roughly British, but more
    . . . liquid, if that makes sense. Then he had the sense to
    finally marry my son's godmother and now they're off
    making babies of their own: half Rhodesian, half
    Indonesian, half Jewish, half Muslim, all 100% gorgeous,
    of course.
     
  13. Drlith

    Drlith Guest

  14. On Thu, 11 Mar 2004 23:21:49 -0500, "DrLith" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Do you have a British accent, or Rhodesian?

    I was sent to boarding school in the north of England at age
    11. My schoolchums beat the Rhodesian out of me and, once my
    accent was 'north eastern', took me to their hearts. In fear
    of such beatings ever recurring, I have retained my 'flat
    'A'' northern accent to this day.

    >half Rhodesian, half Indonesian, half Jewish, half Muslim,
    >all 100% gorgeous, of course.

    All very well, but which side will they be on in the coming
    apocalypse?
     
  15. Drlith

    Drlith Guest

    "Emily Jane Bronte" <[email protected]> wrote in
    message news:[email protected]...
    > >half Rhodesian, half Indonesian, half Jewish, half
    > >Muslim, all 100% gorgeous,
    of
    > >course.
    >
    > All very well, but which side will they be on in the
    > coming apocalypse?

    I was unaware that the Jews were expecting one--figured they
    were rather more "not with a bang, but a whimper" folks.

    If that's the case, I expect they'll be on the side of
    Allah, amongst "gardens watered by running streams, where
    they shall dwell for ever: spouses of perfect chastity and
    grace from God.'" (Sura 3:14-15)
     
  16. On Fri, 12 Mar 2004 07:40:09 -0500, "DrLith" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >I was unaware that the Jews were expecting one

    Expecting one? I thought they were slap-bang in the
    middle of one.

    >If that's the case, I expect they'll be on the side of
    >Allah, amongst "gardens watered by running streams, where
    >they shall dwell for ever: spouses of perfect chastity and
    >grace from God.'" (Sura 3:14-15)

    Yup, I guess the smart money would be on their team.
    Human history tends to run in cycles, and our side may
    have had its day.
     
  17. Open Piper

    Open Piper Guest

    Emily Jane Bronte <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I was sent to boarding school in the north of England
    > at age 11.

    So even your parents didn't want you? I suspected as much.
     
Loading...