How fast/far can ordinary mortals go?

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Daniel Auger, Aug 22, 2003.

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  1. Daniel Auger

    Daniel Auger Guest

    In a few weeks time, I am taking part in the Cambridgeshire Historic Churches Trust sponsored cycle.
    The idea is to cycle to as many historic churches as possible between 10 a.m. and 6 p.m.

    There are several of us doing this ranging in age from 18 to just short of sixty. Most of
    those taking part normally use their bikes for travelling around town and little else, and the
    modal number of gears is likely to be three. There are few hills in Cambridgeshire, but the
    wind can be nasty.

    I know it's a "how long is a piece of string" type question, but any ideas how far/fast we'll be
    able to go?

    Thanks for any suggestions!

    --
    Daniel Auger - [email protected] (Please remove Granta to get a valid address.)
     
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  2. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Daniel Auger wrote:

    > There are several of us doing this ranging in age from 18 to just short of sixty. Most of those
    > taking part normally use their bikes for travelling around town and little else, and the modal
    > number of gears is likely to be three. There are few hills in Cambridgeshire, but the wind can
    > be nasty.
    >
    > I know it's a "how long is a piece of string" type question, but any ideas how far/fast we'll be
    > able to go?

    You should be able to keep up a good 10 mph average Probably better, but that will allow for some
    rests, faffs etc. Most people can do 50 miles if they have to if they're not couch potatoes, though
    they might want whoever's idea it was to be horribly tortured the next day!

    So given you've got 8 hours, I'd say that ultimate distance is more your worry than speed. And it's
    a "travelling salesman" problem to optimise a route to visit as many as possible with a set
    distance. You'll also be best off if you've got several options for cutting short or lengthening the
    route as it progresses.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]
    http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  3. Willowbeauty

    Willowbeauty Guest

    "Daniel Auger" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]...
    > In a few weeks time, I am taking part in the Cambridgeshire Historic Churches Trust sponsored
    > cycle. The idea is to cycle to as many historic churches as possible between 10 a.m. and 6 p.m.
    >
    > There are several of us doing this ranging in age from 18 to just short of sixty. Most of those
    > taking part normally use their bikes for travelling around town and little else, and the modal
    > number of gears is likely to be three. There are few hills in Cambridgeshire, but the wind can
    > be nasty.
    >
    > I know it's a "how long is a piece of string" type question, but any ideas how far/fast we'll be
    > able to go?
    >
    > Thanks for any suggestions!
    >
    Top whack 100-105 miles as I understand you have to stop at each church too, they do a similar thing
    over this part of the world, Bucks, and the helpful tea-ladies slow you down!
     
  4. Tony W

    Tony W Guest

    "Willowbeauty" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > >
    > Top whack 100-105 miles as I understand you have to stop at each church
    too,
    > they do a similar thing over this part of the world, Bucks, and the
    helpful
    > tea-ladies slow you down!

    It must be widespread -- there is something similar in Northants -- looks a nice ride but any
    money collected goes to the church to help them spread misinformation so they will have to do
    without my efforts.

    T
     
  5. Johnb

    Johnb Guest

    Tony W wrote:

    > "Willowbeauty" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >
    > > >
    > > Top whack 100-105 miles as I understand you have to stop at each church
    > too,
    > > they do a similar thing over this part of the world, Bucks, and the
    > helpful
    > > tea-ladies slow you down!
    >
    > It must be widespread -- there is something similar in Northants -- looks a nice ride but any
    > money collected goes to the church to help them spread misinformation so they will have to do
    > without my efforts.

    I think its a national thing. I rode it a couple of years ago wit my daughter (a bell-ringer) but
    the hassle I received for wanting to donate the cash raised to help restore the local church's bells
    instead was unbelievable.

    John B
     
  6. Willowbeauty

    Willowbeauty Guest

    "Tony W" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Willowbeauty" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >
    > > >
    > > Top whack 100-105 miles as I understand you have to stop at each church
    > too,
    > > they do a similar thing over this part of the world, Bucks, and the
    > helpful
    > > tea-ladies slow you down!
    >
    > It must be widespread -- there is something similar in Northants -- looks
    a
    > nice ride but any money collected goes to the church to help them spread misinformation so they
    > will have to do without my efforts.

    Couldn't agree more!
     
  7. Mike Gayler

    Mike Gayler Guest

    Daniel Auger <[email protected]> writed in
    news:p[email protected]:

    > In a few weeks time, I am taking part in the Cambridgeshire Historic Churches Trust sponsored
    > cycle. The idea is to cycle to as many historic churches as possible between 10 a.m. and 6 p.m.
    >
    > There are several of us doing this ranging in age from 18 to just short of sixty. Most of those
    > taking part normally use their bikes for travelling around town and little else, and the modal
    > number of gears is likely to be three. There are few hills in Cambridgeshire, but the wind can
    > be nasty.
    >
    > I know it's a "how long is a piece of string" type question, but any ideas how far/fast we'll be
    > able to go?
    >
    Ah happy memories!

    I used to do this regularly in Leicestershire - the best bit was planning the ride! I used to manage
    about 65 miles in the day, probably 40 churches. I never did the LEicester city centre churches -
    too much hassle with the bike. Don't forget that at each church you need to get off yer bike, be
    nice to the little old ladies, refuse yet another cake and cup of tea, sign in, retreive your bike
    and be off again - it all takes time, particularly if you don't want to be rude. You sometimes get
    tangled up in weddings, which can be amusing / annoying / embarassing (delete as appropriate). Make
    sure you have a good upto date list of open churches!

    Mike Leicester
     
  8. > I know it's a "how long is a piece of string" type question, but any ideas how far/fast we'll be
    > able to go?
    >
    Four times as far as you could walk is a good assumption. If you walk further than you are used to,
    you could seriously damage your feet, with anything from blisters to stress fractures, but cycling
    is less harmful than that, although you might get a bit saddle sore.

    You can always stop to recover, Five minutes in every hour is one rule for marching soldiers, every
    tea shop is a possible rule for cyclists. That will cut into your average speed, but do it right and
    you can go on almost for ever

    However, having the saddle the wrong height can produce problems. Too high, and you rock from side
    to side, hence the saddle soreness; too low, and you could hurt your knees, although it might take a
    few days to do that.

    Change your hand position on the handlebars every so often, so you are not leaning on your hands in
    the same position all day.

    Jeremy Parker
     
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