How long does it take you to change a flat on the roadside??

Discussion in 'The Bike Cafe' started by SWEETRIDE4ME, Aug 6, 2004.

  1. chemcycle

    chemcycle New Member

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    Yeah, that large bucket of water is pain to haul around town.....and splashes a good bit dangling from the drops.......... :p
     


  2. Craig Walsh

    Craig Walsh New Member

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    Oh I agree, and especially when you are getting into a good speed and are riding strong, ir really ruins the ride.

    Al my punctures have been on my back tyre :mad:
     
  3. MountainPro

    MountainPro New Member

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    same as this guy but i use a micro pump instead of cartidges...so maybe 4 minutes.

    i carry a spare tube and about 4 patches. if i do punctre during a ride its usually just the once, if its two then i will use the glueless patches on the second puncture...just press these onto the hole and its an instant fix...theyre pretty good.

    i am not massively concerned with weight on my bike so i like to use a robust tyre that resists punctues as much as possible..
     
  4. gntlmn

    gntlmn New Member

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    Hahhhahhhahhahhha :D
     
  5. tbobby

    tbobby New Member

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    I don't measure it in time, but rather in the quantity and quality of curse words. Four F-bombs and two S-bangs are usually sufficient. If it's hot outside, things can get ugly.
     
  6. Telegram Sam

    Telegram Sam New Member

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    Hahahahahahaha! "my dad wove a string of profanity that is still orbiting to this day"...A Christmas Story

    Stopped twice on the way to work today to make sure two road side patchers had all they needed - damn goatshead thorns!!!
     
  7. estolkne

    estolkne New Member

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    I would agree with the 3 to 8 minute time range, once you've fixed a couple of flats, but the first one will probably take you longer. Murphy's Law seems to apply to the first time.

    Ed Stolkner
     
  8. Grits

    Grits New Member

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    Knocking on wood here, but haven't had a flat on the road yet. I inspect and inflate my tires before each ride. However, I am prepared with tube, patch kit and tools......and cellphone to call hubby:p
     
  9. Lonnie Utah

    Lonnie Utah Banned

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    Went for a ride at lunch today. On the way back I heard a weird noise and though it was my front brakes rubbing. 1 mile later, I'm broken down. Saw lots of folks that offered assistance, which was cool. Anyway, got the tube changed. Started inflating, got done went to pull the pump off and pulled the top of the presta valve. DAMN IT! Time to do it all again. I had to patch the original tube, but made it home after that, no problem.

    L
     
  10. DHinrichs

    DHinrichs New Member

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    Okay, I'm not really believing all of the times you are claiming I don't think you can change that fast. Except for maybe Telegram Sam because he seems to get lots of practice. But I do have a question. All of you have CO2 to fill your tires but have never heard of glueless patches? Why mess with having to wait for glue to dry etc.. before inflating. The glueless patches come in a tiny little plastic case and even with your nylon tire irons barely take any space in a jersey pocket.
     
  11. superclimber

    superclimber New Member

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    People, checking the inside and outside for objects (all it takes is one strand of steel radial off the road and youd never know) and only unbeading one side of the tyre are the two most important things you can do to quicly and effectively change a flat. (if you exclude not getting a flat in the first place). the next most important thing is to carry one or two spare tubes. if you have to change a flat then take the punctured one home, repair it with the kit then use that as a spare on your next ride. I 've got one with five patches on it and its never let me down (punchline..... boom, boom). I take the stance that it only has to get me home, training is over, this mini pump is never going to get me to 110 psi, so I'd better be careful and take it easy. you'll thank yoursel when you make it home. Have an extra beer.

    There is only one thing worse than waiting for a patch to cure and that is waiting for one to cure in the pouring rain, knowing you have no hope of getting it to stick.
    speed patches are fantastic, just get the right ones, park tools and blackburn are the best I've used.

    Last of all, even though you're tired from riding and the last thing you need is to change a flat, BE CAREFUL WITH PRESTA VALVES. Nothing worse than ripping one out with your pump cos you were all over the place and knowing you have to take the whole lot out, patch your old tube, than get going again. maximum frustration ad infinitum

    hope this helps , been in every situation...twice.
     
  12. artmichalek

    artmichalek New Member

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    Every time I've tried to use a glueless patch, it's leaked like crazy because the puncture was near a seam in the tube.

     
  13. Jaguar27

    Jaguar27 New Member

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    About 5 Minutes I guess, although I've never timed myself, if I'm with other Riders I try and do it as fast as I can because I don't want to keep them waiting...

    I see a few People have posted that they have never changed a tube, or don't know how...I'd HIGHLY recommend that they practice at home...you then know exactly what to do when it happens (It always happens miles away from home)...

    Incidentally, I use a 16gm CO2 Cartridge...they will give 125-135psi for a Road Bike Tire...probably takes around 5 seconds to inflate fully...

    Also, I always inflate the Tube a little bit (the amount neccessary comes with practice...that way there's less chance of pinching the Tube with the Tire...
     
  14. Jaguar27

    Jaguar27 New Member

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    My Bucket has a Lid...it works great!!


    :eek:
     
  15. Jaguar27

    Jaguar27 New Member

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    Have you tried turning the Bike upside down? It should rest on the Bars and Saddle...normally...
    :eek:
     
  16. szbert

    szbert New Member

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    Changing a tube is faster than patching. But I don't like the extra weight of the tube. I already carry more weight than I want:)

    I beginner might take 10 minutes for either the first time. After that - it's not so bad.

    It might be a good idea to use slime tubes and a good puncture resistant tire like a Continental Ultragator. I've ridden 6,000+ miles this year like that without a flat. Over asphalt, gravel, dirt and through construction sites.

    If your prepared, fixing a flat can just be a relaxing break and a time for a snack and some gatorade. Don't worry about it!:)

    Have fun and enjoy the ride.
     
  17. awiner

    awiner New Member

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    I HIGHLY recommend carrying a spare tube with you. I used to only carry patches myself, however, today I got a flat and during my slow down the presta valve base got a crack/split in it where the tube meets the valve.

    Luckily I was one block from a bike shop that was open. I will never ride again with a spare tube.

    Might take a little more space in the wedge pack but it is well worth the space it takes.

    I also had to replace a tire that had a tiny cut in the sidewall. Although the cut was not all the way through, I still didn't feel comfortable riding on the tire for long. Now carrying an extra tire would be a problem, fortunately I was able to make it home on the tire and replace it with a spare tire at home.
     
  18. drewjc

    drewjc New Member

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    I actually timed it the other day and it took me 6min45sec from the time i stopped until the time i started riding again. That includes exchanging old for new tube, and pumping up road tyre to about 80psi with mini pump. I obviously also checked the tyre for debris and cuts. I think that is a reasonable time for someone who doesnt get too much practice changing tyres (thanksfully :))
     
  19. BungedUP

    BungedUP New Member

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    Not that any more input is really needed on this but...

    I used to be a bike mechanic, so I got to be fast changing out a flat tube (no Johnny T mind you, but fairly quick). I tought my wife how to change a tube, and she can do it now, but it takes her a considerable amount of time. If you are just learning I would count on it taking more than 15 minutes. If you think it will take less time than that, you might find yourself frustrated, and then you might do something stupid (like rush and force a tire onto a rim and tear a tube). For some people, a lot of practice is necessary.

    Also, I know that some tire / rim combinations make for difficult tire changes. For some, this can increase the time significantly - beginners should be aware of this problem. I learned to be able to change most tubes without any tools. This isn't always possible, but often is once you learn the trick to it. Get good at that, and you start to really speed up the process. When you go back and use tools after that, it's like buttering toast.
     
  20. Cyclist14

    Cyclist14 New Member

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    What about your computer:confused:
     
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