how long does it takes?

Discussion in 'Cycling Training' started by Molala2, Sep 24, 2012.

  1. Molala2

    Molala2 New Member

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    i am now riding at 27km/h for 20 km, My target is to ride at 44km/h for 40 km. how long will it take for me?

    i have been riding since novermber last year, when i was able to ride at around 17km/h for 10 km
     
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  2. tomw1974

    tomw1974 New Member

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    The short answer is: there is no way to know.

    Depending on genetics, training program, weather, injury, life interference, and equipment purchases, it could take a year, two years, or it might never happen. Some people just never get that fast no matter how much they work.
     
  3. Molala2

    Molala2 New Member

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    thanks for ur reply tomw.


    if i can achieve i will certain stand a place in local races. if i cant i can still enjoy faster riding....so i will just work on it and see what will happen....
     
  4. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    Your question is ill posed. It's a bit like asking, "How long is a piece of rope?" There are too many things unknown and too many factors to even guess. The one thing you can be certain of is that it will be dependent on how and how much you train. I suggest you do some web surfing to find websites about training. There are quite a few people on this forum that have good knowledge and ideas on training, but for those people to help you need to provide more information about yourself, your current condition, the rides you typically do, what the terrain is like where you live, and etc. Note that all of your training doesn't have to be on the bike. Cross training would serve you very well.
     
  5. gudujarlson

    gudujarlson New Member

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  6. Monroe71

    Monroe71 New Member

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    Quote: if i can achieve i will certain stand a place in local races
    Riding at 44kph in a bunch is a very different prospect to riding 44kph alone.
    Alienator is right - it is a 'how long is a piece of rope' question.
    Still - great and motivating to have a definite goal to move toward. If you want to get there faster you should look fo a long descent :)
     
  7. Molala2

    Molala2 New Member

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    what is the difference between riding at 44kpn alone and in a bunch??
     
  8. danfoz

    danfoz Well-Known Member

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    From an aerodynamic standpoint, the rider in the front is doing 100% of the work to break the wind, the 2nd guy is doing 85% and the 3rd guy in the line is doing 70%. At 30mph, 85% of a riders energy is used to overcome the wind (don't quote me). And imo it's one of the reasons that makes cycling so much more exciting than running.

    Riding in the middle of a pack can sometimes feel like an easy aerobic pace where the guy(s) at the front may be riding at their thresholds. Depending on my fitness my solo max cruising speed is around 21-24mph. During a race I can easily ride for extended periods at 25mph+ because other riders are sharing the work. That is the difference.
     
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  9. danfoz

    danfoz Well-Known Member

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    Don't neccesarily equate your TT speed with how you will do in races. I placed dead last in a Cat4 time trial last season - I placed 85th out of 85 riders. I think some Cat5's beat me. The following weekend I finished 6th in a mass start race with a maxed out field of 110 riders. How's that you say? Experience, wheelsucking, and good finishing speed... and some luck.

    Edit: You certainly do need a fair amount of fitness to race but I see too many novice riders trying to get a level of fitness they think will help them win their first race and never actually get to the racing part. If you want to try racing just keep riding regularly, try to ride with others at least once a week, and join a local club. Don't worry about the numbers too much. Provided you are not a geriatric and in good health, fun in entry level races can often be had on half a dozen hours of riding a week for just a few months. To be competitive is another story. Good luck.
     
  10. maydog

    maydog Well-Known Member

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    44kph for 40k is an impressive feat. Even with training, not many have the gifts to do it. I don't, after 3 years of pretty intense riding I am struggling to get a 38 to 39kph hour TT average.

    All else equal, going from 27 to 44kph on a flat solo effort will require more than 3 times your current power output. Likely you will not be able to do it with training alone - you will need dedicated time trial gear. In addition to training your fitness, you need to be working on getting aerodynamic.
     
  11. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    It will require about 3.6x more power, in fact. The rule of thumb for riding in a pack is that it will save you about 1/3 of the energy of riding by yourself at the same speed. Note that's just a rule of thumb. At 27kph, roughly 75% of your power goes to overcoming aero drag. At 44kph, assuming the same riding position, about 90% of your power goes to overcoming drag.
     
  12. Yojimbo_

    Yojimbo_ Well-Known Member

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    44 kph for an hour is hugely fast especially if this is a solo ride you're talking about.

    It could take years for you to be able to do that - if ever. Depends on how motivated you are to suffer in training.
     
  13. Molala2

    Molala2 New Member

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    thanks for the reminder everyone, will it be a little bit easier if i lost 60 pounds? i have scope for that...
     
  14. Molala2

    Molala2 New Member

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    i am currently 220 pounds...
     
  15. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    All else being equal the difference in the power required to go 44kph on flat ground when your 220 lbs (w/ 14.5lb bike) and when your 160lbs (with same bike) is a whopping 13 watts, not a lot. Lucky for you, all things aren't equal. As you lose weight your size goes down and so does the aerodynamic area presented to the wind, and thus your aero drag goes down. With your decrease in weight, your cardiovascular system will work more efficiently, freeing up some endurance and/or power. Going uphill will be loads easier. For instance if you're going up a 5% incline at 8mph and you weight 220 (same bike), you'll have to put out 322W. Going up that same slope at the same speed, on the same bike, but with your weight at 160, you'll only need to put out 242W, 25% less. The power savings get even bigger the steeper the slope goes.
     
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