How long to home build?

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by Seth Jayson, Feb 18, 2003.

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  1. Seth Jayson

    Seth Jayson Guest

    OK, say you're a naturally tinkery kind of person: not afraid to cut open your plumbing, knock out
    walls and floors, take stuff off your bike, etc.

    How long would it take you to be able to weld a bike that wouldn't fall apart (until you at
    least put a few miles on it)? I'm not saying, get GOOD at it, but just get something. Perhaps
    purge the system.

    OK, I'm talking about myself, and I've welded in the past, but never tubes, and I'm not a brazer.

    I'm picturing starting not with custom-chunks, but stuff from police auctions, hacked and
    reassembled.

    Should ya take a couple welding classes at the local community college?

    (don't think I'm into the no-weld or wooden scene)

    sj
     
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  2. Rorschandt

    Rorschandt Guest

    [email protected] (Seth Jayson) wrote in news:[email protected]:

    > OK, say you're a naturally tinkery kind of person: not afraid to cut open your plumbing, knock out
    > walls and floors, take stuff off your bike, etc.
    >
    > How long would it take you to be able to weld a bike that wouldn't fall apart (until you at
    > least put a few miles on it)? I'm not saying, get GOOD at it, but just get something. Perhaps
    > purge the system.
    >
    > OK, I'm talking about myself, and I've welded in the past, but never tubes, and I'm not a brazer.
    >
    > I'm picturing starting not with custom-chunks, but stuff from police auctions, hacked and
    > reassembled.
    >
    > Should ya take a couple welding classes at the local community college?
    >
    > (don't think I'm into the no-weld or wooden scene)
    >
    > sj
    >

    Many people have done just as you speak of, some I am sure have been less talented and some more.
    Unless you are really good with TIG welding, torch brazing is the way to go in my book. You may
    be able to put the thing all together in a wooden jig and take it to a good welder, if learning
    to TIG or Braze hasn't been one of your life long dreams. For me, the concept incubates about a
    year+, and I begin acquiring the materials during that time. The actual building might take less
    than a month of free time if you already have a firm idea of what you want it all to look like.
    Mine change shape as I build them, and usually take about 3 months. Some guys can do it in a
    weekend. If you work from a set of plans it may take very little time at all.

    happy trails, rorschandt http://pictures.care2.com/view/1/174801833
     
  3. Tom Blum

    Tom Blum Guest

    OOOPS! I went to the Hooker site and the recumbent pages are not there now. Maybe they'll be back
    later. They are refered to.

    He had a friend who built a second bent at the same time. Maybe I can find his page for you.

    Tom
     
  4. Tom Blum

    Tom Blum Guest

    If you are a good tinkerer, it should take a week.

    Go here and look at my SWB, first version. http://www.gate.net/~teblum/

    Search for"Andrew Hooker, Australia, recumbent" Read his writeup. He was the inspiration for my
    first. Never mind searching, I did it for you:
    http://www.geocities.com/HotSprings/Bath/1913/index.html

    Good Luck. Remember: You will begin planning your next recumbent immediately after your first ride.
    The force is useless to resist.

    Tom
     
  5. Seth, I built a tour easy clone a couple winters back. I fitted the tubing using templates and a
    dremel tool. The frame was built out of throw-aways. Everything was jigged on a slab of plywood and
    and a friend migged it. Mig is not really the way to go but it worked. I finished some of the
    brazeons with a Map gas tourch. It all rode, but It really wasn't the way I hoped so I gave it to a
    friend. It really helps to have some power tools like a hand grinder, drill press, (hand drill will
    work) dremel tool. My best guess is I had about 60 hours into it. It took quite a bit of time to fit
    the tubing using the template method, a tubing notching setup would be nirvana. I think you could
    build a SWB exhaust pipe bike in alot less time. I had fun doing it and would do another if so
    motivated. I've sorta had my eye on a lowracer design. Denny in Sayre, Pa "Bent but not Broken"
    www.recumbentstuff.com "Tom Blum" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > If you are a good tinkerer, it should take a week.
    >
    > Go here and look at my SWB, first version. http://www.gate.net/~teblum/
    >
    > Search for"Andrew Hooker, Australia, recumbent" Read his writeup. He was
    the
    > inspiration for my first. Never mind searching, I did it for you:
    > http://www.geocities.com/HotSprings/Bath/1913/index.html
    >
    > Good Luck. Remember: You will begin planning your next recumbent
    immediately
    > after your first ride. The force is useless to resist.
    >
    > Tom
     
  6. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    Denny Voorhees wrote:
    >
    > Seth, I built a tour easy clone a couple winters back. I fitted the tubing using templates and a
    > dremel tool. The frame was built out of throw-aways. Everything was jigged on a slab of plywood
    > and and a friend migged it. Mig is not really the way to go but it worked....

    RANS used to MIG weld bike frames, and there have not been many failures to the best of my
    knowledge.

    Tom Sherman - Recumbent Curmudgeon
     
  7. If there is a skilled welder wielding the mig tourch it can be done. However the thin Chromolly
    steel blows thru real easy. The welds are strong. I wasn't aware RANS used mig welding. I wonder if
    my 97 Vrex is migged. Its a nicely welded frame. Denny

    "Tom Sherman" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > Denny Voorhees wrote:
    > >
    > > Seth, I built a tour easy clone a couple winters back. I fitted the
    tubing
    > > using templates and a dremel tool. The frame was built out of
    throw-aways.
    > > Everything was jigged on a slab of plywood and and a friend migged it.
    Mig
    > > is not really the way to go but it worked....
    >
    > RANS used to MIG weld bike frames, and there have not been many failures to the best of my
    > knowledge.
    >
    > Tom Sherman - Recumbent Curmudgeon
     
  8. I went from donorbike to first testride in a month making this (using a couple of weekends and time
    off) : http://www.hpv-klub.dk/selvbygger/juniorHPV/default.asp Well, OK, its a kids bike, but it
    doesn't make that much difference (if any) Be afraid, be very afraid - page in Danish.

    Torben

    "Seth Jayson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > OK, say you're a naturally tinkery kind of person: not afraid to cut open your plumbing, knock out
    > walls and floors, take stuff off your bike, etc.
    >
    > How long would it take you to be able to weld a bike that wouldn't fall apart (until you at
    > least put a few miles on it)? I'm not saying, get GOOD at it, but just get something. Perhaps
    > purge the system.
    >
    > OK, I'm talking about myself, and I've welded in the past, but never tubes, and I'm not a brazer.
    >
    > I'm picturing starting not with custom-chunks, but stuff from police auctions, hacked and
    > reassembled.
    >
    > Should ya take a couple welding classes at the local community college?
    >
    > (don't think I'm into the no-weld or wooden scene)
    >
    > sj
     
  9. Jfreewheel

    Jfreewheel Guest

    The actual welding, cutting will take probabaly much less compared to the hourrs you spend
    pondering, and thinking how things are to be done - esp on a first project. That's natural so
    don't sweat it.

    To learn the b asics and most imprtant the safety aspects of brazing, a community college course
    is the way to go. From there only practice can make you good. Brazing, tig or mig will work - it's
    your talent on applying it that makes the difference. Brazing has a lower $$$ entry cost and
    easier to learn.

    I used to remember it took me days pondering how to miter, where to miter and what to miter. With a
    few frames up your sleeves, it becomes more instinct and a practical chore. Framebuilding is no
    rocket science, so don't over analyze - it's been a craft practiced maybe close or over to a century
    ago. No matter what you do , have fun doing it.

    J Gaerlan - Gaerlan Custom Cycles http://www.gaerlan.com Framebuilding,Recumbent and Bike
    Parts eStore
    (415)362-3866: (415)677-8943 fax [email protected]
     
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