How Long Will A Spare Tube Last

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by Tommy, Aug 13, 2004.

  1. Tommy

    Tommy Guest

    I carry a spare tube in my bag under my saddle, however I have not used it
    in over 1 year.
    How long will the tube be ok ? or does it go all hard and brittle ?
     
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  2. Ro

    Ro Guest

    "Tommy" <[email protected]> wrote:
    I carry a spare tube in my bag under my saddle, however I have not used it in over 1 year. How long will the tube be ok ? or does it go all hard and brittle ?

    It pays to take the tube out and inflate it about once every six months.
    Then fold it up in a different pattern to the last time. That way it should last a couple of years. BUT no matter how long, or it seems to me short a time you leave a spare under your seat, they only last until about five minutes before you need to use it.
    I change my tube with every tyre change and every six months if I have not done much riding, to me, tubes are cheap.
    Ro
     
  3. Mike

    Mike Guest

    Tommy wrote:
    > I carry a spare tube in my bag under my saddle, however I have not used it
    > in over 1 year.
    > How long will the tube be ok ? or does it go all hard and brittle ?


    Standard black rubber tube? They last many, many years.
    Natural or light coloured rubber, e.g. white sidewalls,
    will go brittle if exposed to enough UV light (sun).
     
  4. Mike

    Mike Guest

    Ro wrote:
    > It pays to take the tube out and inflate it about once every six months.


    On what do you base this? Folklore?
    Butyl rubber stores very well. Doesn't rot like stressed rubber bands.
     
  5. hippy

    hippy Guest

    "Mike" <[email protected]
    > Ro wrote:
    > > It pays to take the tube out and inflate it about once every six months.

    >
    > On what do you base this? Folklore?
    > Butyl rubber stores very well. Doesn't rot like stressed rubber bands.


    I don't check mine, but I think it would be a good idea.
    Even if you wrap the tube up, there's always the possibility
    that it will rub on something enough to cause a hole.
    It's like checking the spare in your car to make sure it will
    actually hold.air...

    hippy
     
  6. Tamyka Bell

    Tamyka Bell Guest

    Ro wrote:
    >
    > "Tommy" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > I carry a spare tube in my bag under my saddle, however I have not used it in over 1 year. How long will the tube be ok ? or does it go all hard and brittle ?
    >
    > It pays to take the tube out and inflate it about once every six months.
    > Then fold it up in a different pattern to the last time. That way it should last a couple of years. BUT no matter how long, or it seems to me short a time you leave a spare under your seat, they only last until about five minutes before you need to use it.
    > I change my tube with every tyre change and every six months if I have not done much riding, to me, tubes are cheap.
    > Ro


    Wow. I wish I needed to do that. I wish I could keep a spare tube for
    six months without needing to use it.


    T. who has been quietly contemplating life and writing poetry.
     
  7. hippy

    hippy New Member

    Joined:
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    > Tamyka Bell
    > T. who has been quietly contemplating life and writing poetry.

    Why? One too many flats? :)

    I punctured again on Sunday.. made it 10mins out the door
    and then psssst!

    Not happy Tam! ;-)

    hippy
     
  8. Tamyka Bell

    Tamyka Bell Guest

    hippy wrote:
    >
    > > Tamyka Bell
    > > T. who has been quietly contemplating life and writing poetry.

    >
    > Why? One too many flats? :)
    >
    > I punctured again on Sunday.. made it 10mins out the door
    > and then psssst!
    >
    > Not happy Tam! ;-)
    >
    > hippy
    >
    > --
    > hippy


    Actually my last bike "incident" was a wheel clash, the guy in front
    suddenly stood up and then stopped, going up a big hill, thus throwing
    his bike back about a metre into my front wheel. I started bouncing off
    and you know how it is, you can't really steer off or you'll go down, so
    you stay there, bouncing, and then Kev eventually realised he should
    pedal. We both nearly lost our magnets for our computers, because his is
    on his back wheel (and I being lazy have it on my front wheel) but about
    5 minutes later I realised my handlebars weren't straight when I was
    going straight forward. Trusty multi-tool made an appearance. I nearly
    left the house this morning without tyre levers, which would've
    guaranteed a flat. *phew*

    Oh, and the contemplating life and writing poetry is just because that's
    who I am. A geek girl on an SGI O_2 who likes poetry and bike porn.

    ;-)
     
  9. hippy

    hippy New Member

    Joined:
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    Messages:
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    >Tamyka Bell
    >I nearly left the house this morning without tyre levers, which would've
    >guaranteed a flat. *phew*

    My current theory is "if I leave the house with less than 2 spare tubes, I
    will puncture". This has so far held true for the last 4 or 5 punctures,
    including yesterday's when I only had one spare. :-S

    >Oh, and the contemplating life and writing poetry is just because that's
    >who I am. A geek girl on an SGI O_2 who likes poetry and bike porn.

    Kinky ;-)

    hippy
     
  10. Ro

    Ro Guest

    Mike <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Ro wrote:
    >> It pays to take the tube out and inflate it about once every six months.

    >

    On what do you base this? Folklore?
    Butyl rubber stores very well. Doesn't rot like stressed rubber bands.

    Folklore??? Well in fact I ride with people that are now 70 odd years old and were riding bikes in the war as dispatch riders. the reason I check my spare tubes so often is through their directions based on their experience with the old and the newest tyres and tubes. These old buggers, who by the way last year rode the entire length of the Nulaboor? plains,then from Adelade to Sydney to catch a plane home. The year before that the old buugers rode the entire length of the UK. So after listening to riders that actually can ride long distances and know what it is like to have a useless spare tube, I just follow their experienced lead.
    You got any better ideas?
    Ro
     
  11. BCL

    BCL Guest

    On 16 Aug 2004 21:48:33 +1200, "Ro" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >Mike <[email protected]> wrote:


    >On what do you base this? Folklore?
    >Butyl rubber stores very well. Doesn't rot like stressed rubber bands.


    Makes crap catapults too


    Regards
    Bruce
     
  12. Graeme

    Graeme Guest

    BCL <[email protected]> wrote in news:eqe2i0la[email protected]
    4ax.com:

    > Makes crap catapults too


    Latex is best for that. Hmmm.... wonder if my catapult made it over here
    when I moved?...


    Graeme
     
  13. Mike

    Mike Guest

    Ro wrote:

    >>>It pays to take the tube out and inflate it about once every six months.

    >>

    > On what do you base this? Folklore?
    > Butyl rubber stores very well. Doesn't rot like stressed rubber bands.
    >
    > Folklore??? Well in fact I ride with people that are now 70 odd years old and were riding bikes in the war as dispatch riders.


    Yes, thats about what I meant by folklore. Those guys may have got their
    habits in the olde days of latex tubes. Modern ones are different.

    I've used old 27" tubes that have been stored for many years, with no
    signs of
    brittleness. On second thoughts though, if the tube has been patched,
    the patches might weaken with age. Maybe.
     
  14. Guest

    Yes, thats about what I meant by folklore. Those guys may have got their habits in the olde days of latex tubes. Modern ones are different.
    I've used old 27" tubes that have been stored for many years, with no
    signs of brittleness. On second thoughts though, if the tube has been patched, the patches might weaken with age. Maybe.

    These guys have the newest gear, believe me they keep up with ALL the latest gear and trends. They also do on average around 250-300 Ks every week both summer and winter. During our winter they go overseas for and ride some continent or other. None of their gear is older than the last trip overseas.The last thing they could possibly be accused of is being in the latex days. their advice was based on this trip (last year) accros the Nulaboor? plains in Australia.
    All three left with NEW tubes as spares, three each. They rode the entire ride without one puncture between them. When they go to Adelade, one rider decided to ride on down to Sydney. He got to Sydney and got apuncture right under the Sydney bridge. ALL THREE tubes would not inflate, due to perishing on the folds. They were only eight months old and all these riders know how to look after their gear. They do not know if it was the particular weather in Australia or a particular batch of tubes, but what we do now is check our spares every six months, and so far it works as we have found one similar tube which needed replacing within twelve months from new.
    Ro.
     
  15. Mike

    Mike Guest

    [email protected] wrote:

    > These guys have the newest gear, believe me they keep up with ALL the latest gear and trends. They also do on average around 250-300 Ks every week both summer and winter. During our winter they go overseas for and ride some continent or other. None of their gear is older than the last trip overseas.The last thing they could possibly be accused of is being in the latex days. their advice was based on this trip (last year) accros the Nulaboor? plains in Australia.
    > All three left with NEW tubes as spares, three each. They rode the entire ride without one puncture between them. When they go to Adelade, one rider decided to ride on down to Sydney. He got to Sydney and got apuncture right under the Sydney bridge. ALL THREE tubes would not inflate, due to perishing on the folds. They were only eight months old and all these riders know how to look after their gear. They do not know if it was the particular weather in Australia or a particular batch of tubes, but what we do now is check our spares every six months, and so far it works as we have found one similar tube which needed replacing within twelve months from new.
    > Ro.


    OK, thanks for elaborating. It was a genuine question, as I've never
    seen that happen. I just thought maybe they've been doing it ever since
    the latex days, out of habit. Some people still use latex, I'm told.
    (yes, on their bikes I mean :)
     
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