How many components can I carry over to a new frame?



B

bryanska

Guest
Hello wonderful group,

My 1989 Schwinn Tempo is poorly suited for commuting, as it has NO
braze-ons for fenders or panniers. But this is my primary use.

I want a touring frame but cannot afford a completely new bike. How
many of the following components can I bring over to a new frame? Have
standards changed so I cannot bring some over?

--Stem is quill, Cinelli 1A.
--Handlebars are Cinelli 26.4 mm.
--Threaded headset, Shimano 105.
--Downtube friction/index shifters, Shimano 105.
--Brakes are centerpull calipers, SHORT reach, Shimano 105 (so short I
can't get fenders under them - and I need fenders). The brake levers
are basic.
--32-spoke aluminun wheels are Wolber (?) 700C, Shimano 105 hubs(good
to keep, no?).
--Bottom bracket & cranks, double chainring, front & rear derailleur -
Shimano 105.
--The thing has a 7-speed Shimano casette.
--Seatpost - I have no idea what diameter it is.

Do you agree I should buy canti brakes so I can have fenders?

Am I missing anything that a new bike will need?

Your answers are appreciated. Thanks!
 
M

maxo

Guest
On Fri, 08 Jul 2005 15:17:29 -0700, bryanska wrote:

> My 1989 Schwinn Tempo is poorly suited for commuting, as it has NO
> braze-ons for fenders or panniers. But this is my primary use.


You should easily be able to mount full coverage fenders using zip ties
creatively, split the fenders to clear the brakes. You don't need
panniers, think about a huge seat bag like carradice makes, or get a post
mount rack.

You might also want to add some lower gearing by changing the cassette and
getting a long cage derailleur, depending on your local terrain.

>
> I want a touring frame but cannot afford a completely new bike. How many
> of the following components can I bring over to a new frame? Have
> standards changed so I cannot bring some over?


pretty much zero, except for maybe the handlebars and saddle. I'd look for
a used complete bike or older, more suitable touring frame that would
accept your older components. The Schwinn is a pretty neat bike as is, I
wouldn't break it up as the sum of the components is worth more than them
pieced out.

A new frame's going to cost you a pretty penny too, unless you grab one of
those $250 Nashbar touring specials (which aren't bad at all from what I
hear), so a used bike, or lower end hybrid wouldn't cost a lot more. I do
understand wanting a real touring bike though, and they do happen to cost
real money, as it's kind of "niche" these days.
 
M

maxo

Guest
On Fri, 08 Jul 2005 22:47:33 +0000, maxo wrote:

> You should easily be able to mount full coverage fenders using zip ties
> creatively, split the fenders to clear the brakes


might I add that you're only going to be able to fit 700x35c fenders on
that ride--but with a drill, hacksaw, and patience, it'll be fairly easy.
 
M

mark

Guest
"bryanska" wrote ...
> Hello wonderful group,
>
> My 1989 Schwinn Tempo is poorly suited for commuting, as it has NO
> braze-ons for fenders or panniers. But this is my primary use.
>
> I want a touring frame but cannot afford a completely new bike. How
> many of the following components can I bring over to a new frame? Have
> standards changed so I cannot bring some over?
>
> --Stem is quill, Cinelli 1A.


Most modern bikes have threadless headsets, different stem design. Some
really cheap bikes and some really expensive "retro" bikes (Rivendell,
et.al.) have quill stems.
> --Handlebars are Cinelli 26.4 mm.


Should not be a problem
> --Threaded headset, Shimano 105.


See stem

> --Downtube friction/index shifters, Shimano 105.


Lots of new bikes don't even have shifter bosses on the downtube, you would
have to convert to barcon.

> --Brakes are centerpull calipers, SHORT reach, Shimano 105 (so short I
> can't get fenders under them - and I need fenders). The brake levers
> are basic.


There are a few modern dual pivot sidepull brakes on the market that wil
accommodate fenders. Modern brakes are much nicer than centerpulls, old
sidepulls, or cantilevers (tried them all).

> --32-spoke aluminun wheels are Wolber (?) 700C, Shimano 105 hubs(good
> to keep, no?).


Good to keep, yes. In fact, the whole bike sounds good to keep.


> --Bottom bracket & cranks, double chainring, front & rear derailleur -
> Shimano 105.


Keep all this.


> --The thing has a 7-speed Shimano casette.


The current standard is a 9 speed cassette, Campagnolo and Shimano both
also offer 10 speed cassettes. More than 7 or 8 is quite ridiculous for
commuting, IMHO.

> --Seatpost - I have no idea what diameter it is.


27.2 mm is the current standard. Get a bike shop to measure yours.
>
> Do you agree I should buy canti brakes so I can have fenders?


Not unless you're running really fat tires, which might not even fit in your
frame. As I said before, there are modern dual pivot sidepulls on the market
that will accept fenders.
>
> Am I missing anything that a new bike will need?
>
> Your answers are appreciated. Thanks!
>


My advice would be to keep the bike, get dual pivot sidepulls with a long
enough reach to accommodate brakes, improvise a fender attachment system
with zip-ties, P-clips, etc., and get a really big seatbag and/or a
messenger bag to carry stuff in. It sounds like you've got a really nice
bike, you could spend a heck of a lot of money on a new bike or a new frame
and parts and not have a very much nicer bike than you have now.
--
mark
 
E

Earl Bollinger

Guest
"bryanska" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Hello wonderful group,
>
> My 1989 Schwinn Tempo is poorly suited for commuting, as it has NO
> braze-ons for fenders or panniers. But this is my primary use.
>
> I want a touring frame but cannot afford a completely new bike. How
> many of the following components can I bring over to a new frame? Have
> standards changed so I cannot bring some over?
>
> --Stem is quill, Cinelli 1A.
> --Handlebars are Cinelli 26.4 mm.
> --Threaded headset, Shimano 105.
> --Downtube friction/index shifters, Shimano 105.
> --Brakes are centerpull calipers, SHORT reach, Shimano 105 (so short I
> can't get fenders under them - and I need fenders). The brake levers
> are basic.
> --32-spoke aluminun wheels are Wolber (?) 700C, Shimano 105 hubs(good
> to keep, no?).
> --Bottom bracket & cranks, double chainring, front & rear derailleur -
> Shimano 105.
> --The thing has a 7-speed Shimano casette.
> --Seatpost - I have no idea what diameter it is.
>
> Do you agree I should buy canti brakes so I can have fenders?
>
> Am I missing anything that a new bike will need?
>
> Your answers are appreciated. Thanks!
>


Normally, I would think most everything could be transferred to a touring
bike frame.
But the touring frames I know about all have a 135mm wide chainstay spread
instead of the normal roadbike 130mm chainstay spread.
Thus you may have a problem with the rear wheel hub not being wide enough to
work. But I don't know if your Schwinn has the road bike 130mm rear hub or
the mountain bike 135mm rear hub. Unfortunately you won't be able to get a
spacer, that I know of, to adapt the width if they are different. But a
steel frame may be scrunched in a little possibly, aluminum or carbon fibre
frames though cannot be scrunched in a little.So there is the possibility
that you might need a new rear wheel. Or a new hub and respoke in your old
wheel parts.
Most touring bike frames that I see use a quill stem instead of the
threadless stem, but some do use threadless head stems too. So maybe, maybe
not. But those parts are pretty cheap though.
Then you will maybe have to put on new cables maybe, don't know if the old
ones would be long enough or not.
There is a slim possibility that your old caliper brakes may not fit, it
depends on the frame. But most of the time the brakes can be transferred
over with minimal hassle. But these aren't terribly expensive anyway.
There is also a slim possiblity you might need a different seatpost as some
frames may have a slightly different size.
The front derailuer may be a braze on or clamp on, so you might need to
check to see which one you have and whether you need another one or not for
the frame you are thinking about..
Oh yeah, some bikes may use a different width bottom bracket too. But you
won't know for sure until you get it all put together and see how the chain
tracks and stuff.
 

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