How many km to replace cassette and chain



I have all 105 groupset on my bike.
replaced chain with an ultegra chain at 4,000
nearly up to 8,000km.
Should i be replacing my chain and cassette at 8,000km?

NOT my front chain rings that have only done 6,000km?

Will i just push on until it slips, or will that kill the front chain
rings?

I am guessing this chain is still better than my old dirty greasy
crappy MTB chain. Can i put this Ultegra 10spd chain on a Trek 4300??
 
On Dec 10, 12:24 am, [email protected] wrote:
> I have all 105 groupset on my bike.
> replaced chain with an ultegra chain at 4,000
> nearly up to 8,000km.
> Should i be replacing my chain and cassette at 8,000km?
>
> NOT my front chain rings that have only done 6,000km?
>
> Will i just push on until it slips, or will that kill the front chain
> rings?
>
> I am guessing this chain is still better than my old dirty greasy
> crappy MTB chain. Can i put this Ultegra 10spd chain on a Trek 4300??


http://www.sheldonbrown.com/chains.html#wear
 
[email protected] wrote:
> I have all 105 groupset on my bike.
> replaced chain with an ultegra chain at 4,000
> nearly up to 8,000km.
> Should i be replacing my chain and cassette at 8,000km?
>
> NOT my front chain rings that have only done 6,000km?
>
> Will i just push on until it slips, or will that kill the front chain
> rings?
>
> I am guessing this chain is still better than my old dirty greasy
> crappy MTB chain. Can i put this Ultegra 10spd chain on a Trek 4300??


Besides the measuring of the chain for wear, riders need to keep the
chain clean and well lubricated.

I just replaced my entire drive train on one bike, going from a triple
chainring to a compact double chainring setup. But the old chain and
cassette had over 20,000 km of use, and I was only beginning to notice
slow shifting (no skipping yet). My other bike is at 12,000 km on the
original chain and cassette (but may be due for replacement soon).

I ride nearly every day, and alternate more or less equally between two
bikes. I try to clean each bike on about a two week interval. When I
clean the bike, I lube the chain with Pedro's Ice Wax, a wax-based lube
that, when I use it regularly, seems to keep the chain pretty clean (a
paper towel I use to rub off the excess gets a gray color, not black).
 
Bonjour,

Colin Campbell a écrit :

> Besides the measuring of the chain for wear, riders need to keep the chain
> clean and well lubricated.


> I just replaced my entire drive train on one bike, going from a triple
> chainring to a compact double chainring setup. But the old chain and
> cassette had over 20,000 km of use, and I was only beginning to notice slow
> shifting (no skipping yet). My other bike is at 12,000 km on the original
> chain and cassette (but may be due for replacement soon).


> I ride nearly every day, and alternate more or less equally between two
> bikes. I try to clean each bike on about a two week interval. When I clean
> the bike, I lube the chain with Pedro's Ice Wax, a wax-based lube that, when
> I use it regularly, seems to keep the chain pretty clean (a paper towel I use
> to rub off the excess gets a gray color, not black).



In 9 speed, I replace these rooms, on average:
- chain, every 5.000 KM
- cassette, every 3 chains, is 15.000 Km.

But, if mountain, the cassette make only 2 chains, that is 10.000 Km

Lubrificated with TF2

--
Cordialement
Jean Pasquet
[On respecte un homme qui se respecte lui-même] Honoré de Balzac
(pour réponse, remettre les 3 voyelles de mon nom)
 
On Sun, 9 Dec 2007 22:24:37 -0800 (PST), [email protected] may have
said:

>I have all 105 groupset on my bike.
>replaced chain with an ultegra chain at 4,000
>nearly up to 8,000km.
>Should i be replacing my chain and cassette at 8,000km?
>
>NOT my front chain rings that have only done 6,000km?
>
>Will i just push on until it slips, or will that kill the front chain
>rings?
>
>I am guessing this chain is still better than my old dirty greasy
>crappy MTB chain. Can i put this Ultegra 10spd chain on a Trek 4300??


Ignore the mileage. *Measure* the wear; it's not hard, and it tells
you directly whether you need to replace the chain. No guesswork, no
approximations.

http://www.sheldonbrown.com/chains.html#wear

Scroll down to "Measuring chain wear".



--
My email address is antispammed; pull WEEDS if replying via e-mail.
Typoes are not a bug, they're a feature.
Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
 
Werehatrack wrote:

> Ignore the mileage. *Measure* the wear; it's not hard, and it tells
> you directly whether you need to replace the chain. No guesswork, no
> approximations.


This is fine for measuring chain wear, but to know when to replace a
cassette, I know of no better measurement than to replace the chain. If
the new chain skips, replace the cassette (or, at least replace the
offending sprocket).

Chainrings are less susceptible to such wear, but eventually will wear
out as well. I replace them when the teeth get too shark-toothed in
profile, or when they become too thin and begin to break off.

--

David L. Johnson

I believe that the motion picture is destined to revolutionize our
educational system and that in a few years it will supplant largely,
if not entirely, the use of textbooks
-- Thomas Edison, 1922
 
On Mon, 10 Dec 2007 21:11:06 -0500, "David L. Johnson"
<[email protected]> wrote:

>Werehatrack wrote:
>
>> Ignore the mileage. *Measure* the wear; it's not hard, and it tells
>> you directly whether you need to replace the chain. No guesswork, no
>> approximations.

>
>This is fine for measuring chain wear, but to know when to replace a
>cassette, I know of no better measurement than to replace the chain. If
>the new chain skips, replace the cassette (or, at least replace the
>offending sprocket).
>
>Chainrings are less susceptible to such wear, but eventually will wear
>out as well. I replace them when the teeth get too shark-toothed in
>profile, or when they become too thin and begin to break off.


Sometimes front sprockets with worn teeth will exhibit chain suck. If
money is tight or replacement impractical for other reasons, a little
work with a file to remove side burrs and straighten out hooking on
the sprocket teeth will often restore the usefulness of the worn
sprocket enough to allow delaying its replacement.
--
Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
Some gardening required to reply via email.
Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
 

Similar threads