How many miles do you have on your current set of tires?



CalicoCat

Member
Jan 10, 2010
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Noontidal said:
5 years, and somewhere around 1000 miles. No real flats. They are GearX Evolution (if that means anything) kevlar tires. I did accidentally ride over the broken glass of a bear bottle a couple weeks ago, heard a terrifying glass-cracking noise - but no broken tire/tube, whew. I do have to top off my air roughly every two weeks.

Seriously? Air only every two weeks? That sounds like a pinch flat waiting to happen (unless you weigh NOTHING). I am pretty light myself, and air up my tires to 100lbs before EVERY RIDE (ie, every day). . . . or at least every other day. . .

I recommend this to everyone. You don't want to be riding on underinflated tires. Not only does it increase your chances of a pinch flat, but it also increases your rolling resistance.
 

wild

New Member
Aug 11, 2010
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Is Shoe Goo the name to ask for? I went to the new Ace hardware big store but thay looked at me like I was carazy when I asked for Shoe Goo :p
 

64Paramount

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Jul 25, 2009
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wild said:
Is Shoe Goo the name to ask for? I went to the new Ace hardware big store but thay looked at me like I was carazy when I asked for Shoe Goo :p

I bought some Shoe Goo at Walmart today. It was with the shoe polish, shoe strings, etc.
 

alienator

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Jun 10, 2004
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wild said:
Is Shoe Goo the name to ask for? I went to the new Ace hardware big store but thay looked at me like I was carazy when I asked for Shoe Goo :p

Shoe Goo it is.

SGCL-1.jpg
 

Froze

Well-Known Member
Jul 13, 2004
4,711
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NE Indiana
I never gotten more then 1800 miles on any Conti tire including Gatorskins or GP4000's, and got dozens of flats in the process. The most amount of mileage I ever got on tires was from Specialized Armadillo's and they lasted about 5,000 miles with no flats.

My current tires are Kenda Konstrictors...these are the most durable road race tire I've ever used (the Armadillo's are not considered road race). So far they have 1200 miles on them with no flats and no cuts even after riding over a 10th of mile of broken bottles someone had fun doing on a bike path.

I use Super Glue instead of Shoe Goo to close tire flaps or cuts because I can carry a small tube of Super Glue with me, but Shoe Goo doesn't have a small tube, and with Super Glue I can use it for other things if needed.
 

wild

New Member
Aug 11, 2010
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Thanks shoe goo I will find.
I am using Serfas seca S on my flat bar road bike 700x28c I do not get good milage on a tire around here as thay get cut up from the glass befor thay wear out. I did have 1700 on the last set, that were not woren out befor I had to put on new.
 

Froze

Well-Known Member
Jul 13, 2004
4,711
756
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NE Indiana
By the way there is an advantage to rotating tires. I put new ones on the front and older ones on the back. The last set though I put on two new tires on, when the back one gets worn the front will go to the back and new one on the front. If you don't do this then your buying roughly 2 new tires for every front, thus your slapping on a new rear tire on while your front is roughly 1/2 worn...why? Why take the risk of a front blow out as it wears further? Thus move the front to the rear and put the new one you bought on the front.
 

alienator

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Jun 10, 2004
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...or you can just look at the tires and see the wear. There is no quantifiable benefit to rotating the tires. Personal preference does not make a fact.
 

dhk2

Well-Known Member
Aug 8, 2006
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I don't rotate tires either anymore. I've found it's easier to just keep the front in place while going through two rears (about 8K miles) then replace the front while I'm replacing the rear. Even after that mileage, the treadwear dimples on the 4000's still show there is some life left, but I figure no point in wearing down the front all the way.

I do seem to get good, puncture-free life from the GP4000s, but understand we all ride on different roads and in different conditions. Most of my steep climbing is done seated, in the granny ring, and I don't sprint more than a couple of times a month so I'm pretty easy on the rear tire. Running lower pressures than the (120 psi) sidewall max, ie, 100 f/105-110 rear seems to reduce cuts and punctures for me a lot. Conti rates their tires for max puncture resistance @ 95 psi, but I'm a bit heavy to go down that low.
 

Froze

Well-Known Member
Jul 13, 2004
4,711
756
113
NE Indiana
alienator said:
...or you can just look at the tires and see the wear.

I see the wear just fine, when the cords just start appearing, or flats get to be many and the cut(s) reveal just a sliver of tread left. But the highly flat resistant tires you can wear to the cords. I probably wear my down more then most but what the heck I'm cheap! That's why I wait for sales on tires. In May and June I ended up buying 8 pair of Kenda Konstrictors for $18 each that retailed for $45 each from JensonUSA, and their a great tire. One pair already has 1800 miles on them and no flats or even cuts! I can't see spending $45 plus for a tire that will only last 3,000 miles or so, and that is if they make it to run out. I don't buy cheap tires though I wait for the sales. I guess that makes me weird.
 

Froze

Well-Known Member
Jul 13, 2004
4,711
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NE Indiana
alienator said:
Personal preference does not make a fact.

By the way Alien creature I never referred to what I said as fact please subdue your hatred for me, I honestly don't hate you.

Now Sheldon Brown at: Tire Rotation agrees with the same thing I do...not saying that he or I is correct (and I don't agree with everything he says and you probably don't either), it's just another way to do, and for me I've been doing it for many years and will continue to do so. There was an few years when I rode with a wider tire in the rear and 4 sizes narrower in the front, thus I didn't rotate and found myself replacing the both tires at the same time. Why should a person replace both at the same time, or in the case of equal sizes replace the rear 2 to 3 times for every front? As Sheldon say's it's best to have a new tire on the front in case of a blow out which is more difficult to control then a rear.

Again let me repeat myself, I didn't say doing it my way is the best and/or only way, it's just another way, and it's a way that works best for me...and obviously it use to work for Sheldon Brown as well as a few others.
 

alienator

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Jun 10, 2004
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Froze said:
By the way Alien creature I never referred to what I said as fact please subdue your hatred for me, I honestly don't hate you.

Now Sheldon Brown at: Tire Rotation agrees with the same thing I do...not saying that he or I is correct (and I don't agree with everything he says and you probably don't either), it's just another way to do, and for me I've been doing it for many years and will continue to do so. There was an few years when I rode with a wider tire in the rear and 4 sizes narrower in the front, thus I didn't rotate and found myself replacing the both tires at the same time. Why should a person replace both at the same time, or in the case of equal sizes replace the rear 2 to 3 times for every front? As Sheldon say's it's best to have a new tire on the front in case of a blow out which is more difficult to control then a rear.

Again let me repeat myself, I didn't say doing it my way is the best and/or only way, it's just another way, and it's a way that works best for me...and obviously it use to work for Sheldon Brown as well as a few others.

Hate? Where did you get hate from? Perhaps you like reading into things that aren't there.
 

Serious Chris

New Member
Sep 8, 2010
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Good thread here; mostly. Remember that tires don't just ware out from mileage, they also wear out from age. Replace tires every few years to ensure safety even if they sill have visible tread life on them. Also, what CalicoCat said; check the air pressure in your tires before every ride to make sure you're safe, as well as efficient.
 

Froze

Well-Known Member
Jul 13, 2004
4,711
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NE Indiana
Serious Chris said:
Good thread here; mostly. Remember that tires don't just ware out from mileage, they also wear out from age. Replace tires every few years to ensure safety even if they sill have visible tread life on them. Also, what CalicoCat said; check the air pressure in your tires before every ride to make sure you're safe, as well as efficient.

Age after just a few years? Really, how many is a few years on the average for you? Because I had to use my emergency spare tire I keep in seat bag back in May that is about 12 years old, and it's still perfect, flexible, no cracks, no peeling, tread and sidewall still supple, even held 110psi with no problems, and rode on it for 38 miles. Whats really weird, is that I have an original tire that came with my 87 Miyata 712 and it still holds air...but it's got a bunch of cracks on the side walls so I wouldn't ride on it, but it's a cheaper tire then the spare. So is a few years between 12 and 23 years, like maybe 18 years? It will be interesting how long my Torelli ultralight racing tire I use for a spare will last.
 

limerickman

Well-Known Member
Jan 5, 2004
16,130
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64Paramount said:
I've got about 2600 miles on my Bontrager Racelite Hardcase tires and I think they'll go another 2600 just based on normal wear.

This is the third set I've had on my C-Dale and I've had 1 flat since I started using them 6 years ago.

Agreed.

they're an excellent, hardwearing tyre and I have them fitted to my training bike.
 

davereo

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Jun 17, 2010
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Miles on my current set of tires is now at 2000. Maxxis Detonator hopefully they dont live up to their name soon.:p
TPI does this stand for threads per inch of the fiber used in the cord? If so is there a way of finding out what the denier of the fiber is or is there a standard in place?
 

Froze

Well-Known Member
Jul 13, 2004
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davereo said:
Miles on my current set of tires is now at 2000. Maxxis Detonator hopefully they dont live up to their name soon.:p
TPI does this stand for threads per inch of the fiber used in the cord? If so is there a way of finding out what the denier of the fiber is or is there a standard in place?

Their web site was of little use, it gave no information what your cords were made of. TPI does stand for what you said and in your case those tires have 60. The more TPI the more supptle the tire feels on the road, but it doesn't make it more resistant to flats. It's the belt, often called a breaker belt, that depends on the material as to how well a tire will prevent flats; most use Kevelar but some use other material.

This is how Sheldon Brown terms TPI:
T.P.I.

  • Threads Per Inch, the pitch of a threaded fastener.
  • Threads Per Inch of cloth. This is a common spec for tires. The higher the TPI number, the thinner and more flexible the tire fabric is. Thin-wall (high TPI) tires tend to be lighter and have lower rolling resistance, but they're more easily damaged by road hazards.
 

davereo

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Jun 17, 2010
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Froze said:
Their web site was of little use, it gave no information what your cords were made of. TPI does stand for what you said and in your case those tires have 60. The more TPI the more supptle the tire feels on the road, but it doesn't make it more resistant to flats. It's the belt, often called a breaker belt, that depends on the material as to how well a tire will prevent flats; most use Kevelar but some use other material.

This is how Sheldon Brown terms TPI:
T.P.I.

  • Threads Per Inch, the pitch of a threaded fastener.
  • Threads Per Inch of cloth. This is a common spec for tires. The higher the TPI number, the thinner and more flexible the tire fabric is. Thin-wall (high TPI) tires tend to be lighter and have lower rolling resistance, but they're more easily damaged by road hazards.
This makes sense and now I have a better understanding of the listed specs of tires.
 

alienator

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Jun 10, 2004
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davereo said:
Miles on my current set of tires is now at 2000. Maxxis Detonator hopefully they dont live up to their name soon.:p
TPI does this stand for threads per inch of the fiber used in the cord? If so is there a way of finding out what the denier of the fiber is or is there a standard in place?

Some tire companies list TPI for each ply. Others are more sneaky and list total TPI for all plies. What will knowing the thread size/weight do for you?