How many miles should chain ring last?



oldbobcat

Well-Known Member
Aug 31, 2003
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Originally Posted by jhuskey
I personally think one can last 10000 miles if it is taken care of(cleaned , lubed) and your climate and conditions are not too harsh.
Chain hygiene is the key. Keep it clean and lightly lubed, and replace when the chain wear indicator says so. I start checking around 2000 miles, but I'm usually good til 3000. Then figure on replacing the cassette every two or three chains, or when the new chain stops meshing with the old cassette.

I've seen some bikes that haven't had a new chain in a decade. The cassette or freewheel is worn and usually one chain ring, the middle, is worn down like this.

The owner has brought it in because he was "just riding along" and the chain "just locked up."
 

CAMPYBOB

Well-Known Member
Sep 12, 2005
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Quote by magill:
"and I fear my constant cross chaining has shortened the life of this chain ring."

That, it did! Using your 34T ring and another cassette cog will get you the same ratio or a ratio very close to what you were using with your 54T-large cassette gear.

"And as for Frankie (yes I know wrong form). I carry a S&W Body Guard 380 for Dogs and Rednecks a like (concealed with a permit)."

Good for you! I like the Bodyguard. The sights are much more usable than the sights on my Ruger LCP. I swap the LCP out with a Hungarian PA-63 (9 MM Makarov/9x18). HALT usually works on mutts, but I'm not going hands-on with retards. Too old for that ****.
 

dhk2

Well-Known Member
Aug 8, 2006
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I've replaced my chainrings a couple of times now in 35K miles. Actually, replaced the whole FSA triple set at 18K, then recently replaced just the middle ring at 34K since the 30 and 53 showed little wear. Makes sense as I do most riding on the 39 ring.

The teeth don't actually look "shark-finned", but I replace the rings when I find too much freeplay motion when applying pressure to a pedal. I push lightly on a pedal to take up the tension on the chain, then press harder and watch what happens. If the chainrings are worn excessively, the crankarm will move while the chain stays still under load. Also, the bottom of the chain can be easily pulled away from the chainring, even while keeping tension on the crankarm, meaning only the top quadrant of the teeth are carrying all the load. Repeating this check with a new ring is noticeably different....no play under load, no chain climbing up the teeth, and the chain grips tight to the ring all the way round. The drivetrain is quieter when riding as well.

Believe a lot of riders tend to neglect chainring wear. We all know about cassette wear, and those are steel cogs, not aluminum. We can "get away with" chainrings that are badly worn before they would cause skipping, but I figure the worn ring is putting extra load on the chain because fewer teeth are actually carrying the load. Plus, the "freeplay" as the chain tries to lift off the teeth under load can't be good for efficiency, and I need every watt I can muster to go directly to the rear tire.
 

ambal

Well-Known Member
Oct 15, 2010
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Originally Posted by dhk2
I've replaced my chainrings a couple of times now in 35K miles. Actually, replaced the whole FSA triple set at 18K, then recently replaced just the middle ring at 34K since the 30 and 53 showed little wear. Makes sense as I do most riding on the 39 ring.
Thats a lot of miles for a set of chain rings.
 

oldbobcat

Well-Known Member
Aug 31, 2003
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Originally Posted by dhk2
Believe a lot of riders tend to neglect chainring wear. We all know about cassette wear, and those are steel cogs, not aluminum. We can "get away with" chainrings that are badly worn before they would cause skipping, but I figure the worn ring is putting extra load on the chain because fewer teeth are actually carrying the load. Plus, the "freeplay" as the chain tries to lift off the teeth under load can't be good for efficiency, and I need every watt I can muster to go directly to the rear tire.
Thanks for the "freeplay" tip. It appears that initially, a worn chain leads to premature chainring wear. Then a worn chainring leads to premature chain wear.

Actually, the problem I've seen with badly worn rings is not skipping but chain suck. Chain suck happens when the valleys between the teeth get cut so deep the the ends of the teeth function like hooks. The hooking action pulls the chain into the chain stay, causing pedaling to come to an abrupt halt.
 

dhk2

Well-Known Member
Aug 8, 2006
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Originally Posted by oldbobcat
Thanks for the "freeplay" tip. It appears that initially, a worn chain leads to premature chainring wear. Then a worn chainring leads to premature chain wear.

Actually, the problem I've seen with badly worn rings is not skipping but chain suck. Chain suck happens when the valleys between the teeth get cut so deep the the ends of the teeth function like hooks. The hooking action pulls the chain into the chain stay, causing pedaling to come to an abrupt halt.
Yeah, the "freeplay" demo would be a good way to show your customers why replacing a worn chainring is important., well before the hooked teeth and chainsuck stage. If they question the results, you could repeat the demo on a new bike for comparison.

Funny how some people will spend big bucks on a pricey gruppo to get the ultimate in drivetrain efficiency and shifting when they are buying the bike, then just let everything degrade because the routine replacement of wear out items is too expensive.
 

GeoLiam

New Member
Jul 11, 2014
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Just picked up a 'dale synapse secondhand - only got a couple of thousand km on it but the big ring is absolutely shot (small perfect). Like someone has taken a grinder and hammer to it and smashed off or ground down the teeth! Assuming a front derailleur alignment issue or serious ring qa/qc so will replace it, adjust and monitor.
 

Kakashi

Well-Known Member
Feb 3, 2018
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I don't really think that chains has an expiration date when it comes to wear and tear. If you maintain your bike, your chains would really last a long time and you wouldn't really count the miles before you need to replace it. I only replace it once that the bike gets smashed or if the chain breaks due to an accident.
 

Froze

Well-Known Member
Jul 13, 2004
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NE Indiana
If you clean and lube your chain frequently there is no reason you can't get about 6,000 miles on the newer narrower chains. I have 6,000 miles on my chain now and it's still good.

Typically the rear gear cluster should last at least 2 chain lives, and maybe 3, unless you have a Dura Ace or a Record gear cluster with titanium gears then those will need to be replaced every time you replace the chain.

The chain ring should last 3 to 4 chain lives.