How much do tires affect speed?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by JoelTGM, Feb 27, 2011.

  1. danfoz

    danfoz Well-Known Member

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    120psi rear/115 front on a Open CX23 (my definition of "low") at my current svelte 160. If I was riding a more comfortable CF frame I would probably bump it up 5 and 5. I'll take the mulligan anyway it comes... preferably on the road.
     


  2. finnrambo

    finnrambo New Member

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    What about the psychological factor?, I've never won a race on Continental grand prix's but I've won 6 races now on my schwalbe ultremo R.1's and I strongly believe my schwalbe's are better. Just like how those power balance bands work for people that believe in them. (I don't, but Shane Perkins does)
     
  3. Putranto

    Putranto New Member

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    Sorry guys.. just searching at the google and i found this conversations..
    it's more than 1 year after the last comment.. :)

    my roadbikes is using 700x25c
    if I change to 700x23c..
    what's the effect?
    it makes faster too.... Or?

    Thank you

    Putranto
    Indonesia
     
  4. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    It depends. At the same inflation pressure, the 25mm tire will have less rolling resistance than the 23mm tire if both tires are the same make and model. The 25mm tire will have a bit more aerodynamic drag than the 23mm tire if both tires are the same make and model. At the same inflation pressure, the 25mm will provide you a more comfortable ride than the 23mm tire if both tires are the same make and model. How much of difference those three things make depends, in part, on you. No tire is going to turn your bike into a rocket ship. All bets are off when comparing tires that aren't the same make and model since manufacturers size tires differently (one manufacturer's 25mm tire might measure to be 27mm wide while another might measure to be only 23mm wide), have different construction, and have different cross-sectional shape (and thus different contact patch shape). It's certainly not going to be tragic if you try 23mm tires and don't like them.
     
  5. swampy1970

    swampy1970 Well-Known Member

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    Maybe if he didnt wear one and listened to his countryman Steve Hogg, he might have won something at the Olympics :p

    Of course I jest on that one - anyone who medals at the Games is a God in their sport.

    But FWIW I'd take a Conti GP4000S over a Ult-reamer R1.
     
  6. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    I don't wear a Power Band, but I do have a band on one wrist. I think it screws up how I sit in chair and how I hold a fork with the opposite hand. Steve Hogg warned me that the band might cause me to metabolize fresh kale incorrectly and might also cause me to get saddle sores.
     
  7. Putranto

    Putranto New Member

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    Thanks..

    i'm recreational roadbikers using Spec Secteur Alloy, with Sora Gear :(

    What i'm feel now is my bikes become heavier than before or maybe i get weak :)

    Maybe I should change my gear set first then my wheelset..

    or perhaps my bike to Pinarello Dogma /img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif/img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif

    Again.. Thanks
     
  8. Cycling Lymie

    Cycling Lymie New Member

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    WOW!!!! It all makes sense now!

    2 bicycles Hybrid/comfort/flat bar road bike style on 700 x 28 and then my road bike Hutchinson Top speeds 700x 23

    I used to have Michelin dynamics (85 psi) on my hybrid and it was fast! As fast if not faster than my road bike. Yet it really sucked the fuel out of me. Now It has 700x28 Senca FPS wirebeads to feel the same I had to go to 120 psi. Since the switch I've complained about rolling resistance.

    I do ride chip n seal pavement, or semi rough rural roads.

    Pretty sure that this info guarantees that I'll be putting a 700 x 25 on the road bike. I'll just need to choose between Mich Pro3/4 or Conti.

    I am 179 lbs Hybrid is 27 lbs and road bike is 19 lbs My tires get cut up, but I've only flatted once, punctured the Dynamic at night time.
     
  9. Dave Pace

    Dave Pace Member

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    Gatorskins are nice, but I would co with the Conti 4000s. Gators will be better for fall, winter, spring, The gators are a little soft for the summer, and will tend to slow you down a fraction.
     
  10. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    Conti GP Four Seasons will be even better and can be used year round.
     
  11. Dave Pace

    Dave Pace Member

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    Déjà vu
     
  12. HandMeDownRider

    HandMeDownRider New Member

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    Hmm, I'm curious: Is comfort related to pressure in absolute terms or is it a matter of inflation pressure vs tire pressure rating?
    For example - I ride 175 psi rated tires. If I ride them at 150 psi, will that give me a comfort/fatigue advantage over riding 150 psi tires at 150? Or is 150 just 150 no matter the tire rating? Of course, there are other factors, but dealing only with inflation here.
     
  13. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    In terms of comfort, pressure is discussed as a function of tire size, not pressure rating.
     
  14. swampy1970

    swampy1970 Well-Known Member

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    You can use a 4000S all year round too :p Personally I'll take the extra grip of the S and deal with replacing tires a little more often. Even on the odd patch of snow that I've gone across on the S, life was still good. I've never really had a problem with punctures or cuts on the 4000S so I don't really see a need to look for anything tougher. I tend to think a little more about tearing my skin if the tires don't grip as well as expected rather than wondering about a mythical tire shredding exploit that would have been prevented with an extra layer of Duraskin. Duraskin - sounds like something Durex would make especially for extended butt sex.
     
  15. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    The times I've tried 4000s, they've frankly failed. To say I'm unimpressed is an understatement.
     
  16. swampy1970

    swampy1970 Well-Known Member

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    Failed? But you recommend the heftier less grippy version. Interesting. I bet you ride vittoria open tubulars in summer.
     
  17. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    I don't quite understand what logic you are using, but the tires did fail. They provided inadequate protection against debris on the road. As such the need to patch the tubes inside them negated any grip or Crr advantage. Pretty simple, really. More pointedly, "heftier" and "less grippy" don't mean anything. "Less grippy" can possibly describe "grippy enough". "Heftier" can go along just fine with "not so hefty as to provide any meaningful or significant performance sacrifice". You might be surprised to learn there are all manner of racers using tires that might not be as grippy as 4000s and/or might be "heftier." So what? Not only did you fail in your interpretation of what I wrote, you also guessed wrong.
     
  18. swampy1970

    swampy1970 Well-Known Member

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    NorCal has more than its fair share of roads that are in disrepair and more than a few miles of roads in the area lined with the fabled thorny bushes and I "suffer" one puncture a year on average - and i'm not the most cautious rider out there nor am I exactly svelte or waife like. I have to wonder whether the roads in your locale resemble those in an ass-backwards third world hellhole. Maybe I'm just blessed by the Gods of tyre inflation but apart from situations where you're not riding a heavily loaded touring bike I really don't see a need to run tires that need to be extra tough or have multiple layers of puncture protection - that said, I now weigh more than my old race weight combined with a heavily loaded touring bike. You should try a little harder to miss " road junk "
     
  19. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    Road junk. Yeah. You assume so much.
     
  20. swampy1970

    swampy1970 Well-Known Member

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    There's only a limited number of things that'd typically cause a tire to "fail" Road junk: glass, rocks - or shards thereof, thorns, nails/screws, bits of wire etc. Road funk: potholes, cattle grids, overly large expansion joints and other "hazards" that present themselves for big impacts when riding at speed. I'm sure you ride that fast that heat related delamination occurs on the road. Personally I've only seen that on the indoor trainer. Casing/bead failure either due to manufacturing fcuk up, un-noticed cut or impact damage or excessive heat. That's kind of what I was alluding too. Just common stuff. Maybe out in Area 51 you have other modes of "failure" that are unique...
     
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